Updated
12/4/98; 9:56:24 AM
dot picture dot picture dot picture LTSeek Home
LTSeek daily email list:
dot picture
ltopleft picture dot picture ltopright picture
dot picture Check this out

CheckItOut
Archives


Subscriptions

What's this about?
dot picture
lloleft picture dot picture lloright picture


Visit
Webliographer
on
rel@x
dot picture
dot picture dot picture dot picture
corner   Friday, 4 December 1998 corner
dot
In the wake of the Virginia court decision which forced a Virginia public library to leave at least some of its Internet-connected computers unfiltered, a second case is being argued in California. In this case, a mother of a 12-year-old boy is suing the library system because her son managed to download sexually graphic pictures from the Internet using a library computer. The mother's lawyer says that the library should have installed filters on their machines.

Political scientists gather at Harvard to discuss the impact of the Internet on political campaigns. "Andrew Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, said his organization found in a telephone survey that 6 percent of voters named the Internet as a principal source of election information. That number reflects a drastic increase over the 3 percent who relied upon the Internet in 1996, according to an earlier study. Still the proportion pales in comparison to television, which was the primary source for 78 percent of respondents to the Pew survey, and newspapers, the primary source for 60 percent of respondents."

Web guru Jakob Nielsen suggests that old web pages should neither die nor fade away. "Once you have put a page on the Web, you need to keep it there indefinitely."

Bruce Tognazzini (well known UI designer, formerly at Apple) discusses the Sorry State of Web Design. His argument is that web designers typically ignore years of research in user testing and usability in favor of glitzy graphics and opaque functionality. With more and more educational technology relying on web browsers as a primary UI, this is a particularly timely message. Thanks to Eric Baumgartner for this link.

From today's Tennessean:

  • Middle Tennessee elementary school is the only Tennessee school to have full access to Planet Think, a satellite downloaded video instructional program. Page 1B.
  • Parents of special education students in Tennessee now have a web site resource at SPAN-TN.org. Page 9B.

    If you'd like a regular mailing of each day's entries in LTSeek, put your email address in the space provided above and then hit "Join." Each day (or so) I'll send you an indication of what's new in LTSeek. (Don't worry; I won't spam you, and the subject heading will identify LTSeek so you can delete it without reading it if that's what you'd like to do. What's more, you can unsubscribe easily [and receive double your money back] by using the Subscriptions page linked in the menubar to the left.) So sign up today by putting your email address in the space above and then hit "Join."

  • dot
    corner  corner

    corner   Thursday, 3 December 1998 corner
    dot
    Some of these toys seem to be pretty smart, but it's not clear that they'll help kids learn.

    Boston School Committee votes to appeal federal court ruling to the Supreme Court. If the Supreme Court agrees to hear the appeal, its decision could have an impact on public school desegregation efforts across the nation.

    Responding to criticism, Harvard decides to use $95 million from its endowment to make improvements in the school's educational programs.

    Ashlawn Elementary School in Arlington, Virginia does well with limited resources. Some indicators: a third of its students are designated as low-income students, but its fifth grade readers are in the 87th percentile of readers nationwide. Over a quarter of its 3rd-5th graders are in a gifted student program.

    From today's Tennessean:

  • Editors urge School Board to stay the course on school desegregation plan, despite the challenge from conservative Atlanta legal foundation. Page 16A.

  • dot
    corner  corner

    corner   Wednesday, 2 December 1998 corner
    dot
    Students in Colorado raise money to free slaves in the Sudan.

    In the past few months, I've linked to a story about the Thinkquest Challenge and to several different sites created as entries in that challenge. Last week, the winning site designers received college scholarships as their prizes.

    HealthScout is a web site providing concise articles about health and nutrition topics in the news.



    dot
    corner  corner

    corner   Tuesday, 1 December 1998 corner
    dot
    Universities and public school systems across the country begin to use computers and electronic books in place of textbooks. "Valerie Raymond, an editor at McGraw-Hill, said: 'I am a book person and I never believed I would want to give up the books I carry around with me. But I'm starting to think of myself more as a content provider. I look at my 11-year-old son's school backpack, which I worry is ruining his spine, and I can see advantages to electronic books. We know we are standing on the edge of a precipice.'"

    New York City teacher requests and receives a transfer to another school because she feared violent reaction to her attempts to teach her students how to get along despite racial differences.

    Drop-out rate of Hispanic students worries educators nationwide.

    Here's the Discovery Channel web special on the building of the Panama Canal. And two more entries in the ThinkQuest Challenge, one about deadly viruses and the other about the Egyptian pyramids.

    From today's Tennessean:

  • Tim Chavez writes with passion in support of salary increases for students, and encourages students to write in support of their teachers. Page 1B.
  • Federal mediator prepares for meetings next week with teachers and the school board. Page 5B.

  • dot
    corner  corner

    corner   Monday, 30 November 1998 corner
    dot
    In this small Georgia town, middle school students are issued laptop computers, which they carry to and from school. Officials are finding an unexpected benefit. Although 37% of the adults in the county did not graduate from high school, parents of middle school students are taking advantage of their kids' computers to learn about computers for themselves.

    Here's a survey of different web-based course delivery and maintenance systems.

    Last month the Metamorphosis Project hosted a conference on Technological Visions: Utopian and Dystopian Perspectives. You can now view an online version of the conference.

    Here's a web-based free group calendar system.

    From today's Tennessean:

  • Parents of children in special education programs demand more for their children. Page 1A.

  • dot
    corner  corner


    dot picture
    dot picture dot picture dot picture This page was last built on 12/4/98; 9:57:07 AM by John Rakestraw of the Learning Technology Center. Send comments to john.rakestraw@vanderbilt.edu. At the moment I am using Macintosh OS to work on this website.