FACILITY DESCRIPTIONS, in Order of Highest Security Level at Facility

Maximum Security

Lexington Assessment and Reception Center

The Lexington Assessment and Reception Center opened as a minimum security facility named Lexington Regional Treatment Center in converted World War II Naval buildings. Construction began on the current facility in 1976. The Rex Thompson Minimum Unit was begun in May 1983, and a four building medium security unit opened in September 1983. The facility includes the maximum security reception center for the Department of Corrections, as well as separate medium and minimum security housing units.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview of Reception Center

Mabel Bassett Correctional Center

The Mabel Bassett Correctional Center (MBCC) was originally opened as the Women's Treatment Facility in 1974. On November 10, 1977, the facility was renamed Mabel Bassett Correctional Center, honoring Mabel Bourne Bassett, state commissioner of Charities and Corrections from 1923 to 1947. In 1979, the center was upgraded to medium security and then to maximum security in 1982. The facility currently houses three levels of security: minimum, medium, and maximum. The Oklahoma Community Corrections Center was converted to the Mabel Bassett Minimum Unit in June 1999.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Oklahoma State Penitentiary

Oklahoma State Penitentiary (OSP), located in McAlester, is the state's oldest prison, with construction beginning in 1908 and completed in 1912. OSP primarily houses the state's maximum security male offenders; however, medium security and minimum security units are also available to meet the needs of the growing offender population.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Medium Security

R.B. "Dick" Conner Correctional Center

Dick Conner Correctional Center, located north of Hominy, opened in August 1979. In June 1992, the minimum security unit opened. The minimum security unit has since been renamed the John L. Dahl Minimum Security Unit, honoring retired Senator John L. Dahl of Barnsdall, Oklahoma.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

James Crabtree Correctional Center

James Crabtree Correctional Center is located in the town of Helena on the grounds of the old Connell Agriculture College and Helena Orphans' Home. The facility was originally established in 1904 and has served the people of Oklahoma as a county high school, a junior college, an orphanage, and a training school for boys. In May 1982, the former Helena State School for Boys was officially designated as James Crabtree Correctional Center.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Joseph Harp Correctional Center

Joseph Harp Correctional Center, located east of Lexington, is a medium security institution for male offenders. The facility officially opened on September 16, 1978, and received its first inmates two days later. The site of the facility was used by the Navy as a firing range during World War II. After the war, the land was turned over to the Mental Health Department, which in turn transferred it to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections in 1971.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Lexington Assessment & Reception Center

The Lexington Assessment and Reception Center opened as a minimum security facility named Lexington Regional Treatment Center in converted World War II Naval buildings. Construction began on the current facility in 1976. The Rex Thompson Minimum Unit was begun in May 1983, and a four building medium security unit opened in September 1983. The facility includes the maximum security reception center for the Department of Corrections, as well as separate medium and minimum security housing units.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview of Lexington Correctional Center side

Mack Alford Correctional Center

The Mack Alford Correctional Center is located north of Stringtown and was established in March 1933, as a farm under the auspices of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary. In 1937, Governor Marland introduced vocational education training to the prison, and the emphasis was changed from punishment to rehabilitation. Today, the facility serves as a medium security facility with a minimum security unit attached.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Oklahoma State Reformatory

The legislature created the Oklahoma State Reformatory (OSR) in 1909. The construction of OSR was accomplished with prisoner labor. The construction material was granite rock from the reformatory's own mountain, "Wildcat Mountain." There are no original buildings on the 10 acre walled compound. The oldest structure on the yard is the Oklahoma State Industries broom factory/upholstery building built in 1921 with an upper floor (Lakeside High School) added in 1949. All other buildings were built since 1957.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Minimum Security

Charles E. "Bill" Johnson Correctional Center

Bill Johnson Correctional Center opened in September, 1995, in Alva, Oklahoma. It is a multi-phase drug offender work camp designed to break the drug use cycle by utilizing the military boot camp model, intensive drug treatment, and a labor intensive work program. Strict regimentation, drill, and physical fitness combine educational programs to earn increased privileges and instill personal responsibility and strong work ethics. A one-year after care program follows each inmate to assess his ability to avoid future drug offenses.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Center

Dr. Eddie Warrior Correctional Center (EWCC) in Taft, became operational on January 1, 1989 as part of the 1988 special legislative session called to address prison overcrowding. EWCC currently includes two boot camp style programs - Female Offender Regimented Treatment and Shock Incarceration Programs. The education department boasts a 300 percent increase in its success rate for those inmates who attempted a General Equivalency Diploma, and Chapter I is currently the only program for female offenders in the state of Oklahoma. Self-help programs added to the many existing programs include Victory Bible Institute, Shoplifters Anonymous, and expansion of the New Directions Program. An employment committee was established for inmate jobs which successfully addresses inmate idleness issues.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Howard McLeod Correctional Center

Howard McLeod Correctional Center (HMCC), previously McLeod Honor Farm, was established in 1961 as part of Oklahoma State Penitentiary. In May 1978, McLeod Honor Farm was renamed Howard McLeod Correctional Center. HMCC is located in southeast Atoka County near the community of Farris. The 5,100 acres were purchased primarily to farm vegetables and fruit. The philosophy was that enough fruit and vegetables could be raised to meet the demand of all the state correctional facilities. Currently, the acreage is supervised by Oklahoma State Industries for a beef herd and feed and hay production.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Jackie Brannon Correctional Center

Jackie Brannon Correctional Center (JBCC), located in McAlester, is a minimum and community security institution. JBCC is a working prison; each inmate is assigned an institutional job. The facility provides a work force of minimum security inmates in support of Oklahoma State Industries (OSI) Agri-Services operation. The OSI Agri-Services unit supplies beef and pork products, milk, and eggs for the majority of the state prison population. Offenders in the Community Corrections Unit are classified as community security inmates and are utilized in the community by city, county, and state entities under the Prisoner Public Works program. They perform a variety of jobs such as trash pickup, road repair, maintenance, janitorial, and general laborer duties. Within the Community Corrections Unit, there is an ongoing Chemical Abuse Program that has been in place for approximately 14 years.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

James E. Hamilton Correctional Center

James E. Hamilton Correctional Center (JEHCC), located eight miles south of Hodgen in southeastern Oklahoma, is a minimum security institution. It sets on 140 acres surrounded by the Ouachita National Forest. The history of this facility dates back to the days of the Civilian Conservation Corps for which it was originated. It later became a Job Corps Center which focused on training the youth of that era. Just before the facility was set to be demolished, it was acquired to train inmates in the vocational technical field. They may choose from 11 different vo-tech skill areas which are offered and a wide range of educational opportunities, such as Adult Basic Education, General Education Development, Talk Back Television, and on-site college courses. Strong emphasis is placed on acquiring educational and vocational skills which will enable inmates to increase their chance of becoming a productive member of society upon release.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Jess Dunn Correctional Center

Jess Dunn Correctional Center (JDCC), located in Taft, was constructed in 1932 as the Taft State Hospital. The facility was used for many purposes, including a tuberculosis sanitarium and a juvenile home before being opened as the state's largest minimum security prison in 1980. JDCC has the largest Prisoner Public Works program in the state, saving local communities more than $1.4 million annually. Other inmate work assignments include Oklahoma State Industries Agri-Services, maintenance, food service, and a variety of other duties within the facility. JDCC offers a large variety of educational programs, including Chapter 1, General Education Development, Adult Based Education, and Bacone College.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

John Lilley Correctional Center

The John Lilley Correctional Center is located in Boley. Education programs include General Educational Development, Adult Based Education, literacy, computer assisted academic instruction, and vo-tech programs. Self-help programs include Vision Quest (a multi-disciplinary treatment program); RAPHA; Alcohol Chemical and Treatment Series; Alcohol, Narcotics, and Cocaine Anonymous; Promise Keepers; marriage and family planning classes; and Moral Reconation Therapy. Oklahoma State Industries Agri-Services and Industrial Production divisions have units located at the facility. Prisoner Public Works crews provide services to local communities.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

 

Mabel Bassett Minimum Unit

The Mabel Basset Minimum Unit (formerly Oklahoma City Community Corrections Center) is located at 315 West 1-44 Service Road in Oklahoma City. It was established by the legislature in 1970 as a community corrections center, and was limited at that time to a capacity of 16 inmates.  It became one of two minimum security facilities for female inmates in Oklahoma June 7, 1999. 

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center

The Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center (NOCC), located in Vinita, began start-up operations July 1, 1994. The official opening date was December 13, 1994, when the first 25 inmates were received. NOCC is primarily an adult male minimum security facility, although a Treatment Alternatives to Drinking Drivers program also is located at the facility and inmates in this program are community residential. Inmates are assigned to Prisoner Public Works programs in the community, the Oklahoma State Industries Agri-Services division farming operation, and support services for Eastern State Hospital.

Brief Facility Overview

William S. Key Correctional Center

William S. Key Correctional Center (WSKCC) is located in historic Fort Supply, which was once the site of a military post. Inmates maintain the 3,558 acres that comprise the grounds. Anchored in a belief that people can change, the staff at WSKCC pursue creating an atmosphere that promotes that change. Making a difference is our goal. Opportunities for personal growth and development of skills and responsible behavior is provided through various programs and services offered to the inmates. This is accomplished through the three units which make up the facility - Regimented Inmate Discipline, Key to Life Unit, and the general population.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Community

Altus Community Work Center

Altus Community Work Center opened February 23, 1993. The offenders range in age from 18 to 60. The offenders not only work within the city of Altus, but also a crew that works in the Blair community and another on Altus Air Force Base. The center is very active in the "Christmas in the Park" program in Altus. The offenders help to raise money and also work on the project. Another yearly project is the recycling of old bicycles for needy children. Each year the center helps with the Run Against Child Abuse by selling T-shirts, taking donations, and running.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Ardmore Community Work Center

Ardmore Community Work Center opened in May 1990. Ardmore CWC began with 40 inmates and was the first 100-man work center in the state. Oklahoma Resource Center in Pauls Valley began working a seven-man crew. This crew works around the grounds of this facility.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Beaver Work Center

Beaver Work Center truly demonstrates community spirit through 14 Prisoner Public Works crews and numerous special projects. The impetus for the work center rests on the belief that an inmate's willingness to get involved in community service greatly enhances his ability to reintegrate into society, to abide by the morals and standards, and live as a responsible, productive citizen.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Clara Waters Community Corrections Center

Clara Waters Community Corrections Center is a community security facility located in north Oklahoma City. The center was opened in March 1978, as an all female facility, and was the first facility in the Department of Corrections to allow overnight visiting on weekends for inmates and their children. In September 1983, male inmates were received at the facility and the count rose to 120. Currently it is an all male facility.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Earl A. Davis Work Center

The Earl A. Davis Work Center was established as the department's 15th work center on August 1, 1994. It has a total of 8,000 square feet of space, situated on five acres, approximately two miles west of Holdenville. The work center's primary function is to provide support to the City of Holdenville and surrounding communities through Prisoner Public Works programs. Construction of the facility was financed by the sale of $600,000 in tax-exempt bonds through the Holdenville Industrial Authority. It is owned by the community and leased to the Department of Corrections. The facility was named in honor of Earl A. Davis (1903-1986), a prominent Hughes County judge, community leader, and rancher. The land upon which the work center is located was once part of one of his ranches.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Elk City Community Work Center

From its opening in 1993, the Elk City Community Work Center has impacted the community of Elk City through Prisoner Public Works crews, special projects, and the development of a cardboard recycling operation that generates revenues for the community. Numerous beautification projects through the community have been accomplished by means of rock masonry for city signs and marquees. Increased utilization of volunteers is a goal to further community interaction to accomplish mutually beneficial purposes.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Enid Community Corrections Center

Since its establishment in January 1974, Enid Community Corrections Center has housed male inmates serving sentences for nonviolent, non-sexual offenses.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Frederick Community Work Center

Frederick Community Work Center was opened in March 1991. Staff members were assigned to this location on October 1990, while the center was still under renovation. The center was originally designed to house 30 (expanded to 100) inmates assigned to various city detail crews such as a city street crew, a city lake crew, and parks and sanitation crews. The age of offenders assigned to the Frederick CWC is 18 to 60, but at one time the center had a 14 year old. The center has great support from the citizens of Frederick, including pastors, legislators, advisory councils, as well as businessmen in the community.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Healdton Community Work Center

Healdton Community Work Center opened in August 1990. The former American Legion building was remodeled. City beautification projects completed include flower gardens at the armory and water department, and a rock garden and fish pond behind the U.S. Post Office.Crews work with the City of Wilson, and the General Education Development program.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Hobart Community Work Center

Hobart Community Work Center opened on March 8, 1993, with 50 beds for offenders. Ages at Hobart CWC range from 18 to 60. The purpose of the work center is to help reintegrate offenders back into society. Offenders are expected to work every day and are responsible for obeying the rules of the center, as well as the community.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Hollis Community Work Center

Hollis Community Work Center was a facility for male inmates until April 1995, at which time the Department of Corrections with the consent of the city of Hollis made the transition to an all female facility. The female offenders perform the same jobs as the male offenders. New jobs have been added for the females at the hospital and the convalescent home.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Idabel Community Work Center

Idabel Community Work Center, a community service facility with a maximum capacity of 80 offenders, is located on Highway 37 West, approximately one mile west of Idabel. The facility received its first residents on December 17, 1990, and has been assisting the communities of Idabel, Broken Bow, and Wright City, as well as Beavers Bend State Park, E.T. Dunlap Higher Education Center, Green Box Solid Waste Project, Oklahoma State University forestry research, Oklahoma Forestry, and others since then. In all, 13 agencies use the center's residents to augment their manpower. In addition to helping local government agencies, work center residents volunteer their time and labor to assist the historic Wheelock Cemetery; Kiamichi Youth Shelter; the Hand-to-Hand Organization; local city parks; the Garvin, Idabel, and Wright City rodeos; and cleaning, mowing, and upkeep of area roadsides.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Kate Barnard Community Corrections Center

The Kate Barnard Community Corrections Center opened in June 1977. Prior to being converted to a community corrections center, the facility was a motel. In July 1992, the facility was converted to house females. The facility was named in honor of Miss Kate Barnard, who was the first Commissioner of Charities and Corrections in Oklahoma, elected to office in 1907.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Lawton Community Corrections Center

Lawton Community Corrections Center (LCCC) opened in April 1973. The inmates are involved in the continuing project of remodeling a wing of a dormitory at the Fort Sill Indian School, which will be used for the Comanche Language Program for children ages three, four, and five .New crews were started at LCCC for projects in the City of Anadarko, Caddo County, the City of Apache, and for the Comanche Tribe.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Mangum Community Work Center

Mangum Community Work Center was established in the old Howard Furniture store in downtown Mangum, Oklahoma. The center opened on December 10, 1990, with eight offenders constructing rooms upstairs to house 50 offenders. Offenders perform public work programs within the community of Mangum and assist Greer County and Quartz Mountain Park crews.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Marshall County Community Work Center

Marshall County Community Work Center, located in Madill, Oklahoma, opened in October 1991. Marshall County CWC inmates work for city, county, state, and municipal organizations and provide many hours of community service.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Muskogee Community Corrections Center

The Muskogee Community Corrections Center (MCCC) and Probation and Parole District I merged on January 1, 1995, to form the District I Community Corrections unit. This merger was the first of its kind and has benefited both staff and offenders in numerous ways. With this merger and the opening of the Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center, the Muskogee center relinquished its responsibilities of the Treatment Alternatives for Drinking Drivers program to the new facility. The center and probation and parole have become active in temporary placement of community inmates at the Muskogee center.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Sayre Community Work Center

Unique to the Sayre Community Work Center is a landfill operation utilizing 15 inmates who labor under supervision of city employees to maintain and operate this community service. Only with the utilization of inmate labor is the community of Sayre able to operate this revenue producing service.

A premier project of this work center is the inmate participation in and community support of the Run Against Child Abuse. Monies generated through the inmate efforts remain in the community of Sayre and are managed by the Beckham County Child Abuse Program, whose membership includes work center staff working in cooperation with the Department of Human Services for appropriation. Sayre Work Center enhances the community of Sayre and is accepted as an integral part of the community.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Walters City Community Work Center

Walters City Community Work Center opened in May 1993, and its host facility is Lawton Community Corrections Center.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Waurika Community Work Center

Waurika Community Work Center opened in November 1989, under the host facility of Lawton Community Corrections Center. Waurika CWC was the first work center to be opened in the state of Oklahoma. The Waurika tree farm is the largest tree bank farm in the Department of Corrections. Inmate crews work at the Jefferson County Fair Barn, Jefferson County Courthouse, Ryan Housing Authority, and the City of Ryan. Waurika CWC began on-site General Education Development classes with the help of Red River Vo-Tech in Duncan, Oklahoma.

Facility Photo and Brief Overview

Probation and Parole

District 1 Probation and Parole

District 2 Probation and Parole

District 3 Probation and Parole

District 4 Probation and Parole

District 5 Probation and Parole

District 6 Probation and Parole

District 7 Probation and Parole

November 01, 1999