Shadows of Cairn  June 1995
Publisher: Masque Publishing   Developer: Ant Software   Required: 386/16; CD-ROM drive; 4MB RAM   We Recommend: 486/33; Windows 3.1 or better; Compatible sound board   Multi-player Options:   

My first computer was a Timex Sinclair, a little black box hardly bigger than a good scientific calculator, with an 8-bit processor and one of those touch-sensitive membrane keyboards. It came with 2K of RAM, but I "upgraded" it to a whopping 16K so I could run the scant handful of games available for it.

The program I remember best was an adventure game called "Raiders of the Lost Tomb" (or something equally original). The object was to gather treasure while exploring a tomb laid out in a predictable, geometric pattern. Occasionally, there were snakes or mummies to contend with, but the gameís main feature was repetition -- understandable, given the limitations of the technology. But this is 1995, and any new game that reminds me of that old Sinclair has some serious problems.

Sad to say, Shadows of Cairn is one of those games. Even with high-resolution graphics and an hourís worth of digitized sound, the gameís most notable quality is how mind-numbingly boring it is.

Cairn takes place in a pyramid-shaped city with eleven walled levels. As an apprentice thief, your goal is to reach the summit and prevent the assassination of the duke who rules the city -- if you fail, youíll be framed for his death.

Naturally, itís not as simple as making your way to the dukeís keep and stopping the assassins. Youíll need weapons and information first, and that means running a seemingly endless series of errands for just about everyone whoíll talk to you. These errands are simple enough -- go get an object and bring it back -- but thereís little challenge to them. Youíre told exactly where the object is, and because the city is laid out in such an organized fashion, thereís seldom any question of how to get there. So a big part of the game consists of holding down one cursor key and running through one non-descript scene after another.

The only time the game becomes a challenge is when youíre in a maze like the Wizardís Tower, or his hedge maze. And then it becomes unreasonably difficult. The Wizardís Tower is especially frustrating, because most of its rooms are not connected by doors or passages -- instead, you step into an alcove that teleports you to another room. Problem is, re-entering the teleporter you just arrived in wonít take you back to the last room -- it sends you to another room altogether. Mapping this maze is close to impossible, and itís about as far from entertaining as you can get.

Youíd think a little combat would make Cairn more interesting, but all it manages to do is increase the frustration factor. In fighting mode, your character responds very slowly to an arcane system of keyboard or joystick commands. And there seems to be no rhyme or reason to defeating an enemy: In one moment, a flurry of mixed attacks wonít be enough to kill a monster; then the next time around, two simple jabs will send the same enemy to its grave. To make matters worse, any hit you receive to your back or side kills you instantly, so if you find yourself flanked by enemies, itís time to restore an earlier save.

Add to that an annoyingly inappropriate garage-band soundtrack and some of the worst voice-acting youíll find in a computer game, and Shadows of Cairn seems destined for a long life -- in the software discount bins.

--Dan Bennett

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Duck under this slime-creatureís tentacle, then move in close and stab it a couple of times. Simple enough, but get used to this dance -- youíll be doing it over and over and over and...

If you find yourself flanked by two enemies, youíre really as good as dead.

When you recover an item for someone, youíre treated to a brief close-up of it. Say, isnít Crazy Guyís Rat one of those bands from Seattle?

FINAL VERDICT
40%
HIGHS:
The graphics are nice.
LOWS:
What little there is to do in this game is extremely frustrating.
BOTTOM LINE:
This one fails on just about every level--there's no story to speak of, and the action is slow and repetitive.
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