GO Network
GO Kids | GO Family | GO Money | GO Sports | GO Home
Infoseek Search
  
ABCNEWS
  WEB
  
  
GO Network ABOUT GO NETWORK | SIGN IN | FREE E-MAIL
HOME

NEWS SUMMARY

U.S.
     Raw News

POLITICS

WORLD

BUSINESS

TECHNOLOGY

SCIENCE

HEALTH&LIVING;

TRAVEL

ESPN SPORTS

ENTERTAINMENT

WEATHER.com

REFERENCE

LOCAL

ABCNEWS ON TV


US HEADLINES

F-16 Crashes

iCourt Offers Online Justice

Weather Aids Fight Against Wildfires

Air Conditioners Cause Calif. Energy Troubles

Do School Discipline Policies Harm Blacks?


Sponsored by ABCNews.com



SPECIAL SERVICES
Shopping Guide

Auto Section

SEARCH

ABC.com

EMAIL
    ABCNEWS.com


SEND PAGE TO
    A FRIEND


TOOLS AND
    HELPERS






Safe Ejection
Two U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons
F-16 Fighter Jet Crashes in Arizona After Pilot Ejects Safely

Two U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons fly in formation during a mission. An F-16 fighter jet similar to these crashed today near Sells, Ariz. (www.defenselink.mil)


The Associated Press
S E L L S, Ariz., June 16 — An F-16 fighter jet crashed today east of the Barry M. Goldwater Range, a spokeswoman at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona said. The pilot ejected safely.
Luke Air Force Base, based in suburban Phoenix, is the world’s largest F-16 training base, flying more than 100,000 sorties a year. (ABCNEWS.com/ Magellan Geographix)
     Senior Airman Jill Propst said the Luke-based plane went down during a training exercise southwest of Sells in southern Arizona.
     The pilot was being taken to a hospital to be checked out but appeared to be fine, she said.
     The F-16 is a $20 million jet used for air-to-air combat and air-to-surface combat missions.
     Luke, based in suburban Phoenix, is the world’s largest F-16 training base, flying more than 100,000 sorties a year.

The Fighting Falcon
June 16 — The F-16 Fighting Falcon is one of the most widely used fighter jets in the world, with over 4,000 aircraft sold by its maker, Lockheed-Martin, to 19 air forces around the world. It is used in air-to-air and air-to-surface attacks. Since it first went into service in 1979, it has become “the most sought-after fighter in the world,” according to its manufacturers.
     The U.S. Air Force describes it as a relatively low-cost, high-performance aircraft that “has proven itself in air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack.”
     The F-16 is considered a backbone of the U.S. Air Force, playing vital roles in recent conflicts. During the 1991 Persian Gulf war, the fighters were used to attack airfields, military factories, Scud missile sites and other targets.
     All active units and many Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units now use the F-16C/D, the most recent and advanced version of the aircraft, with up-to-date cockpit control and display technology. It seats one pilot.
     The jet’s official top speed is 1,500 mph, with a maximum altitude of 50,000 feet. The craft uses one M-61A1 20mm multibarrel cannon, and can carry as many as six air-to-air missiles, as well as conventional air-to-air and air-to-surface munitions and electronic countermeasure pods. Each F-16C/D costs more than $20 million, the Air Force says.

— ABCNEWS.com

Copyright 2000 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 SEARCH ABCNEWS.com FOR MORE ON …
A Jet That’s ‘Proven Itself’


F-16 Falcon


Copyright ©2000 ABC News Internet Ventures. Click here for Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and Internet Safety Information applicable to this site.