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Reviews

FlipDog.com In The News


October 12, 2000  Bluffton News Banner


" FLIPDOG.COM http://www.flipdog.com/home.html What do you want to be when you grow up? Massage therapist? Creature developer? Feline behavior trainer? If you're burnt out on your current job or don't have a current job, but aren't sure where to look, Flipdog.com may just be the place. In addition to the regular job listings, career advice, resume tips, and employer profiles, Flipdog offers a selection of cool jobs (excerpted above) and jobs by region. Perhaps you're looking for clerical work in Virginia, or an engineering position in Washington. Flipdog can hook you up. So if the only niche you've been able to find is the one you created in your couch while perusing mid-morning Deep Space Nine reruns, this may be your big break. "


October 12, 2000  Engineer's Digest

Maintenance Resources.com and WhizBang! Labs Form Strategic Alliance

"MaintenanceResources.com, an on-line source for plant engineering, maintenance, and reliability products and information, announced a strategic alliance with WhizBang! Labs, Inc., provider of the FlipDog.com Web site, which provides its users with products and services related to on-line recruiting.

Through the partnership, MaintenanceResources.com is providing its audience with access to over 525,000 jobs, powered by the FlipDog Service. Visitors to MaintenanceResources.com will be able to post their resumes or available job openings free of charge on the FlipDog site."


September 29, 2000  Atlanta Journal and Constitution E-Business News Column

Stable Job Market

"Georgia ranked 17th overall in a FlipDog .com survey that gauged job opportunities. In its monthly Job Opportunity Index, the Georgia job market was ranked "stable," as opposed to competitive or tough, said Brett Walker, FlipDog 's vice president of marketing. "There are a pretty good number of opportunities available and a pretty good number of people who'd qualify for those opportunities." Also, employers in Georgia had a good chance of filling jobs with local talent rather than having to scour the country for workers, Walker said. Georgia ranked 13th in actual number of jobs available. Flipdog .com found about 14,000 jobs posted online for Georgia jobs. Massachusetts ranked No.1 overall. Mississippi and West Virginia ranked at the bottom."


September 27, 2000  Fast Company, by Gina Imperato

Fetch a Good Job at This Site

"Wanted: A better way to use the Web to find a job. It's a tall order, given that there are something like 10,000 career sites on the Net. But FlipDog.com differs from the big job sites in one important way: It doesn't wait for employers to list openings on its site. Instead, it prowls the Web, collects job postings directly from employers, and puts them in one central location. As I'm writing this piece, FlipDog has 554,023 listings from 46,575 different companies.

Of course, you still have to find the job that's right for you. You can visit the site; choose a location, a job category, a function, or a company; and then get a list of the openings that meet your criteria. A better approach, though, is to use the "JobHunters" feature. You can use it to indicate specific job criteria and receive email notices when a job that meets your requirements is added to the database.

You can also specify whether your level of interest in finding a new job is active, passive, or private. If you're actively looking for a job, prospective employers can view your resume. If you're passively looking, your information will only be available to employers to whom you've submitted applications. If you choose to keep your job-search status private, then your personal information will be blocked from potential employers.

My one bone to pick: The site has some obvious gaps. For example, while setting up my JobHunter, I couldn't list Microsoft as a company to watch because it wasn't part of FlipDog's directory. That's a pretty big oversight."


September 18, 2000  Wichita Business Journal

Kansas ranks 31st in index

"FlipDog.com released the September edition of its Job Opportunity Index, a monthly report that provides statistics about online job opportunities nationwide. In it, Kansas ranks 31st in job availability. The index tracks a variety of online job statistics and samples more than 600,000 job postings from morethan50,000 employers who post jobs on their own Web sites."


September 18, 2000  Alabama

Alabama Ranks 44th in online job opportunity index

" Provo, Utah-based FlipDog.com reports in the September edition of its Job Opportunity Index, which provides statistics available about online job opportunities nationwide, that Alabama ranks 44th nationally in business climate for online jobs. Additionally, Alabama ranks 41st in the number of online job opportunities per 1,000 workers. The index tracks a variety of key online job statistics and samples more than 600,000 job postings from more than 50,000 employers who post jobs on their own Web sites.

Still, Alabama is considered a tough business climate by FlipDog.com, meaning there are limited opportunities and a lack of qualified workers for existing opportunities. However, there are some opportunities that would be attractive to qualified non-residents or qualified employees of other organizations in the area. Recruiting strategies in places such as Alabama either require broad searches or the targeting of qualified employees at work in nearby organizations."


September 15, 2000  Oklahoma, by Gregory Potts

Web site says job cilmate tough in state

"Oklahoma has a "tough" job opportunity climate, according to a report released Thursday by a job search Web site.

Flipdog.com, based in Provo, Utah, ranked Oklahoma 41st for job opportunities in its September Job Opportunity Index.

According to the ranking, Massachusetts offers the best job opportunities.

The company said Oklahoma and other "tough" markets are lacking in opportunities.

One Oklahoma economist dismissed the report.

Robert Dauffenbach, director of the Center for Economic and Management Research at the University of Oklahoma, said he was not impressed with the methodology used in the study.

The report is primarily based on the per capita number of Internet-listed job opportunities for each state. Dauffenbach said the ranking may actually indicate which states are using the Internet most for recruitment.

Dauffenbach said he, too, is working on research regarding Oklahoma's job market. He also said there may be some positive signs that the Flipdog.com ranking doesn't show, such as a consistently low unemployment rate and a strong rate of job growth.

The rankings of Oklahoma's neighboring states varied dramatically in the report. Colorado ranked seventh and Texas 12th, labeled as "competitive" markets. Missouri ranked 22nd and Kansas 31st. Those two states were labeled "stable" markets. Okla"


September 14, 2000  LightWave News

Va., Md. in Top 10 of BestJob Opportunity Climates - Survey 09/14/00

"PROVO, UTAH, U.S.A., 2000 SEP 14 (NB) -- By Michael P Bruno, Washtech. Virginia has the sixth best job opportunity climate of the 50 states and Maryland has the ninth best, according to the September breakout of FlipDog.com's Job Opportunity Index (JOI). But the Old Line state also made the list of top-10 states with the largest opportunity climate decrease over the summer, the Web surveying company said. With more than 50,000 employers and 600,000 jobs sampled, the JOI is "the first-ever and largest sample of job opportunities listed by employers on their own Web sites," said FlipDog.com, which itself started in April. But considering only jobs found listed on the Web were included, the company said the database is not meant to be an exhaustive survey of US employers. FlipDog.com said regarding number of jobs per state listed online, the Commonwealth ranked in seventh place with 18,919 in this month's survey; Maryland placed 15th with 13,299. Combined, the two states would list fifth on that list with 32,218 jobs after New York with 32,889 and Illinois with 23,328. California topped the list with a blowout of 108,400--more than twice second-place Texas, which had 41,498. Washington, D.C., was not listed in any rankings provided by Provo, Utah-based FlipDog.com, and company representatives could not be reached this afternoon to comment whether the District was surveyed and added to another state's data or not even considered. Other non-state US territories also were not listed. Both Virginia and Maryland were described as "competitive" markets for job opportunities. The 15 competitive markets were defined as "those where a high number of opportunities exist for an insufficient pool of qualified laborers." Lesser job-active market descriptions in order included "stable" and "tough." But Maryland also ranked ninth out of the 10 top states with the largest opportunity climate decrease between May and August, the JOI said. Utah placed first on that list with the most climate decrease. FlipDog.com said the JOI will be released monthly, and the indexes since May, as well as more information, are available on the company's site athttp://www.flipdog.com/.Reported by Washtech.com, http://www.washtech.com . (20000914/WIRES ONLINE, PC, TELECOM, BUSINESS/)"


September 14, 2000  Newsbytes, by Michael P. Bruno

Va.,Md. in Top 10 of Best Job Opportunity Climates -Survey

" Virginia has the sixth best job opportunity climate of the 50 states and Maryland has the ninth best, according to the September breakout of FlipDog.com's Job Opportunity Index (JOI). But the Old Line state also made the list of top-10 states with the largest opportunity climate decrease over the summer, the Web surveying company said.

With more than 50,000 employers and 600,000 jobs sampled, the JOI is "the first-ever and largest sample of job opportunities listed by employers on their own Web sites," said FlipDog.com, which itself started in April. But considering only jobs found listed on the Web were included, the company said the database is not meant to be an exhaustive survey of US employers.

FlipDog.com said regarding number of jobs per state listed online, the Commonwealth ranked in seventh place with 18,919 in this month's survey; Maryland placed 15th with 13,299. Combined, the two states would list fifth on that list with 32,218 jobs after New York with 32,889 and Illinois with 23,328.

California topped the list with a blowout of 108,400--more than twice second-place Texas, which had 41,498.

Washington, D.C., was not listed in any rankings provided by Provo, Utah-based FlipDog.com, and company representatives could not be reached this afternoon to comment whether the District was surveyed and added to another state's data or not even considered. Other non-state US territories also were not listed.

Both Virginia and Maryland were described as "competitive" markets for job opportunities. The 15 competitive markets were defined as "those where a high number of opportunities exist for an insufficient pool of qualified laborers." Lesser job-active market descriptions in order included "stable" and "tough."

But Maryland also ranked ninth out of the 10 top states with the largest opportunity climate decrease between May and August, the JOI said. Utah placed first on that list with the most climate decrease.

FlipDog.com said the JOI will be released monthly, and the indexes since May, as well as more information, are available on the company's site at http://www.flipdog.com."


September 8, 2000  Business 2.0

Wanted:  Decent Job Site Ads

" FlipDog.com

www.flipdog.com

Location: Provo, Utah

Campaign: Print ads in business and trade

magazines, newspaper ads, radio spots, and

billboards

Estimated cost: $5 million

Critique: Jury still out

A Jack Russell terrier with a green spot around his eye, Jake is the key character in FlipDog.com's first marketing campaign:

"Meet the new face of online job fetching." Ads claim that FlipDog is "The biggest spot [the word is in green type] for jobs," and the tagline is:  "Fetch your next job here."

The "biggest spot" refers to the site's hoped-for differentiator-its proprietary technology. FlipDog was launched in April by a group that included Dallan Quass, co-founder of data extraction company Junglee, which Amazon.co.m purchased for $180 million in August 1998. Before the Amazon aquisition, one of Junglee's clients was CareerPost.com, the online recruitment site of The Washington Post. FlipDog's technology is derived from research Quass did at Junglee and is based upon two programs. One travels through the Web searching for sites that have job listings. The second, with the other sites' permission, grabs those listings and posts them on FlipDog.

The programs search every day, differentiating FlipDog in a market that is desperate to keep job listings fresh and plentiful. The site claims to post 500,000 listings a day. Do job-seeking consumers really want megasearches? Jupiter's Gluck: "Consumers are already overwhelmed by listings out there. They're not looking for more listings, but relevant listings. "

Then there's, well, the dog. "Fetch your next job here" is a serviceable tagline, and Jake is cute. But what's the intuitive user connection between a dog and job hunting? That wasn't the reason why the company picked the pup, apparently. "We wanted something playful, attractive, and fun-loving to be stuck in consumers' heads," explains Brett Walker, vice president of marketing. "Jack Russell terriers are pretty friendly dogs. [The TV character] Frasier has a Jack Russell terrier." (Yeah, but Frasier has a job.)

The company faces a problem also matched by the local pound-too many other dogs already there. Forget customers thinking the dog is friendly. First they have to remember what business FlipDog is in. Is it a sports site (Fogdog)? A pet food site (Pets.com)? "1 think a lot of these sites fall into the Pets.com syndrome," says Jupiter's director of online advertising, Patrick Keane, referring to everyone's favorite whipping icon, the sock puppet. "1 think it's creating more noise rather than rising above it. The mascots aren't really going to rise above the din. And it's going to cost a lot of money to get the information out about what they actually do."

Still, lots of job seekers have figured out what the site does. In July, FlipDog ranked as the tenth most visited online career site, according to Media Metrix, with 384,000 unique visitors that month."


September 3, 2000  Seattle Times


"A quick scan of cool jobs on FlipDog.com shows openings as spacecraft naviation specialist, wrangler, golf-cart attendant, Comedy Central media-relations representative and Starbucks merchandise planner.Obviously a wide range of education requirements crosses this list."


August 24, 2000  The Internet Recruiting Edge/RISE, by Barbara Ling

RISE Executive Saw No 'Summer Slowdown' in Internet-based Recruitment

"RISE is partnering with FlipDog.com, owned by WhizBang! Labs of Salt Lake City (www.flipdog.com), a pioneer and leader in e-recruiting technology, and also presenting company-specific seminars for business leaders including Campbell's Soup(NYSE: CPB), Continental Airlines (NYSE:  CAL), and Deloitte & Touche LLC."


August 21, 2000  Pacific Business News

Local career Web sites take off

"The online job-search business is dominated by a few "category killer" sites, such as Monster.com and FlipDog.com, which list hundreds of thousands of jobs from around the country."


August 15, 2000  Smart Money:  Odd Jobs

CHOOSE YOUR POISON

" The Rain Forest Department is seeking a Herpetologist with thorough knowledge and experiene in captive care, progagation and exhibitry of neotropical amphibians and reptiles, with a strong emphasis on poison dart frogs.

National Aquarium, Baltimore"


August 14, 2000  Inte@ctive Week

Web Job Sites Face Tough Job

"Two of Weddle's favorite sites are FlipDog.com and Exec-U-Net. FlipDog scours corporate sites for job openings often not listed on the public sites - where companies pay a fee for the listing. Exec-U-Net focuses strictly on executive openings starting at $100,000. FlipDog doesn't charge the company when it displays the jobs. It focuses instead on sending the job seeker to the company for free, while charging companies for extra services."


August 8, 2000  Industry Standard

MASSACHUSETTS HAS JOBS 

"FlipDog.com released the August edition of its "Job Opportunity Index," a monthly report detailing statistics on online job opportunities nationwide. The Index divides the number of laborers in a region by the number of job listings online. In Massachusetts, it found that there were 8.38 job opportunities for every 1,000 laborers, and 320 jobs available for every 1,000 unemployed. (The national average was83/1000.) California came in second, with 5.93 jobs listed per 1,000 workers."


August 5, 2000  Knight-Ridder Tribune Business News

Memphis, Tenn., Area Internet Job Postings Remain Low

"Tennessee, Arkansas and Mississippi ranked in August among the bottom 10 states in the nation, in terms of jobs posted on the Internet per thousand workers, a new report states.

In May, FlipDog .com Inc., of Provo, Utah, started generating a report about the number of jobs posted online per thousand workers and per thousand unemployed workers in each state. In the August report, Mississippi ranked 49th in terms of postings per thousand workers, while Arkansas ranked 48th and Tennessee ranked 41st.

Lindsay Carter, president of the Capital Area Human Resources Association in Jackson, Miss., attributed his state's relatively low number to the fact that the state has a relatively low percentage of households connected to the Internet. Carter is the human resources director at The Clarion-Ledger, in Jackson.

Indeed, southern states have a lower percentage of homes connected to the Internet. In 1998, the latest year for which information is available, Tennessee ranked 41st among the 50 states on that score, with just 21.3 percent online. Mississippi ranked last with 13.6 percent, and Arkansas came in 49th with 14.7 percent.

Kay Brewer, president of the Central Arkansas Human Resources Association in Little Rock, said, "Employers are going to recruit in the area that they feel is most economic and logical for the people they're trying to recruit. If you are looking for laborers, most of them wouldn't look at a Flip Dog.com, for example."

But Jill Stem, president-elect of the Memphis Chapter of the Society for Human Resource Management and human resources director for Memphis's Nova Factor contract pharmacy, said her company recruits online regularly.

"We've been using FlipDog since May and have got a couple of resumes through them, which is pretty good," Stem said. "Most of the major employers that I am aware of, we talk about Internet recruiting a lot. ... It's a hot topic."

She said a relatively large portion of her company's 400-person Memphis work force must have college degrees, often in technical fields.

Elizabeth Sellers, chief of human resources for the Campbell Clinic, is the current president of the Memphis Chapter.

"Jobs that are online tend to be higher skilled jobs, and the people looking for them tend to be the types of individuals who are surfing the Net," she said. "You only have a certain amount of money you're recruiting with, and you tend to go to the (medium) that gets you the best results."

Sellers has noticed progress, in recent years, toward the use of higher technology. People used to almost exclusively mail their resumes, but now people usually fax them, she said.

"I think we're getting there, but we're not quite there yet," she said, talking about a totally electronic recruiting environment. "If you ask me this question in five years, there will be a different answer."

Perhaps. In FlipDog 's May report, Tennessee had 1.16 jobs posted online per thousand workers. Thus, the August number of 1.45 represents a 25 percent increase. But Tennessee was also ranked 41st in the May report. "


August 2, 2000  e-cruiting business

FlipDog supports headhunters

"FlipDog.com, the e-cruiting site powered by technology upstart WhizBang! Labs Inc., Provo UT, on Aug. 1 began offering its service to recruiters and staffing agencies. The solution includes:  automatic posting of job listings from the third-party site to FlipDog.com (refreshed weekly); unlimited candidate/resume search functionality; unlimited multiple users (simultaneous use OK); and free company profile, link to company site and company logo on all postings. Pricing varies based on the number of job postings simultaneously displayed on FlipDog.com the fullsolutionmay be purchaed for as low as $149 a month."


July 31, 2000  Computer Letter

Private Profiles:  WhizBang! Labs.

" Putting data-extraction techniques to work for the job hunter

The Web is a confusing place for computers. They can connect to millions of sites and jiggle the electrons fast enough to make them all produce more than a dumb show, but once past the clues provided by HTML and XML tags, the machines have no way to determine what part of a page refers to, say, location, and which part lists a dollar amount. All of these pages from myriad sources have different shapes and structures, and if computers did have a way to classify online content without painstaking human supervision, a wealth of ordered and useful databases could be the result.

WhizBang! Labs has come up with just such a Web-crawling and data-extraction technology. For its first application, the plucky little Utah company is going head-to-head with the big job boards. But this is no suicidal frontal attack. WhizBang is sneaking around the flanks of the established sites and vacuuming jobs from company home pages to aggregate onto its FlipDog.com job site. This might just work, in part because of increased use of the Web by job hunters and employers alike.

According to figures from Recruitsoft.com, 92% of North American companies recruit on their own Web sites, up from only 29% in 1998. For WhizBang, the near ubiquity of the practice provides an opportunity to build quickly the longest list of job openings on the Web. Granted, the online job market seems pretty mature. Most entrepreneurs who dare enter do so by attacking a new geographical or occupational vertical slice or by providing a value-added service along the lines of WetFeet.com's in-depth profiles of employers. Yet here's FlipDog.com, sending its canine mascot into a nationwide contest with the likes of Headhunter.net, which just swallowed CareerMosaic, and TMP Worldwide's Monster.com, which lists almost 400,000 jobs.

Monstrous opportunity

Online markets, of which job boards are a variant, are supposed to be races to liquidity with the first to achieve a dominant share of audience impeding the growth of late arrivals by its mere presence. WhizBang's FlipDog site, which launched at the end of March, dares enter the crowded field because with 550,000 jobs listed, it already has more "sellers" than Monster.com. This feat was accomplished with technology that crawls the Web in search of company job pages and automatically extracts the elements--such as title, description, location, and contact--which result in a meaningful and navigable database.

Of course, the applicant or "buyer" traffic is still nowhere near the figures enjoyed by the established players. Media Metrix reports that Monster.com had 3.85 million visitors in May. WhizBang, which recently raised $30 million in venture capital, is relying on a limited advertising campaign, the press, and word of mouth to get people to its site. This somewhat old-fashioned insouciance about building a brand and traffic in today's crowded Web is, we believe, justified by the sophistication of the software agents that have built such a comprehensive job database. In fact, the technology could even take on the complementary job of finding the necessary eyeballs. FlipDog is considering crawling the Web in search of e-mail addresses from posted resumes and recruiting organizations that would be used as the basis of a direct-marketing campaign.

The passive employer

FlipDog is using price to take on the recently entrenched sellers of online job postings. Just as Monster is able to dramatically undercut the cost of a classified ad in a major paper, FlipDog does not require an employer to pay anything or even do anything beyond post job openings on a company's own site. Still, even at this zero-cost level, FlipDog faces big competition. JobsOnline, which launched last year, has almost as many visitors as Monster. Yet we believe FlipDog can prevail because of the quality of the jobs offered and the site's low-key advertising, which doesn't detract from the experience of using the site.

The pool of ads behind the site's targeted banners still seems to be a bit thin, as well as misleading: We were shown ads for programming jobs in Michigan while searching for journalism jobs in the Bay Area. Nonetheless, the number and quality of the jobs FlipDog displayed impressed us and compared favorably with other sites.

Return to the Junglee

The technology used in FlipDog has roots that go back to Junglee, the pioneer in data extraction bought by Amazon.com two years ago. WhizBang's co-founder and chief technical officer Dallan Quass, also a co-founder of Junglee, is taking those techniques a step further. While Junglee's dataextraction language greatly increased the ease of making text behave like relational data tables, it needed humans to tell it where to find the elements sought after. In other words, a new format or Web site required the writing of a new program. WhizBang! Labs' technology extends this power of mapping disparate terms into a common data structure to the Web's legion of heterogeneous formats. The trick is to turn the machines from a reliance on formal clues such as font and location and teach them to approximate the pattern-recognition capabilities of humans.

WhizBang's software uses a variety of classification techniques--such as decision-tree algorithms, Bayesian Networks, and maximum entropy models--to speed through newly seen swaths of the Web and copy only the right kinds of pages. The software then looks across these pages to identify the common elements, such as job title and location, that make the database useful.

For competitive reasons, WhizBang is leery of revealing just what technique or combination of techniques has proven most effective. In any case, the company claims that its formula can classify three-quarters of the material with a high enough degree of accuracy that the results do not need to be reviewed by editors.

Related approaches to looking at text as a whole are available from Autonomy and Verity for use in personalization or knowledge management. But Webhire's automated candidate search service has the closest application. That company's crawling and extraction technology is similar to FlipDog's (even to the degree of being based on a Junglee technology license) but works in the opposite direction. Corporations pay Webhire to mine the Internet for resumes that are ranked according to candidates' location and relevance of skills.

First of the litter

FlipDog is confidently described as only the first division of parent company WhizBang! Labs, whose broader business is creating databases from elements that are gathered from the Web automatically and assembled with minimal human oversight. The collected information will be monetized either through advertising, as is the case with the new job board, or by selling access to planned databases of corporate information and product specifications. Another possibility: collecting information on continuing education courses and organizing it by institution, course name, and time and location. All of these plans take advantage of the ability to learn by example and automatically extract rules, no matter what type of documents make up the training set. WhizBang plans to launch these products this fall and at the beginning of next year.

But will companies object to having their jobs lifted onto the FlipDog site? That's conceivable, yet WhizBang reports that less than 1% of the companies crawled didn't want their jobs in FlipDog's database. That minority, along with any sites that warn off bots, are excluded from aggregation. But as WhizBang acts on its plans to collect databases of product specifications and corporate information, it could find itself facing less cooperative sources of information that may, depending on how the law turns, have the power actually to not cooperate. In May, a federal judge ordered that the auction-comparison service Bidder's Edge stop collecting information about eBay's auctions.

Furthermore, if a pending bill supported by that auction house becomes law, payment and permission would be required before information is systematically extracted from online databases. In that case, WhizBang's crawling technology--whose particular strength is that it can automatically classify heterogeneous collections of documents such as the Web--would scale only with the help of cash and lawyers. But this legislation, which threatens search engines, comparison-shopping engines, and a range of content aggregators, will have plenty of high-powered opposition.

Glut busters

In addition to building a promising business, we see this data-extraction technology as a way to enlist computers in the fight against info-glut. The World Wide Web has so successfully linked information from a range of sources that it often contains a more complete record on most subjects than closed databases such as those created by Dun & Bradstreet and Hoover's. Yet the scale of information on the Web requires a machine's speed to survey even a portion, while the variety of formats requires a human's oversight to classify--and thus make manageable what is found.

By minimizing the need for manual supervision, WhizBang's agents can economically scour the Web for facts, classify them, stick them into the right boxes, and sell the resulting product for far less than maintaining a database filled with manually collected information.

At a Glance

WhizBang! Labs

3210 North Canyon Road, Suite 300 * Provo, UT 84606 801-418-7100 * www.whizbang.com

President and CEO Bob Sherwin

Founded May 1999 Employees 80

Financing $35 million in two rounds

Investors Bear Stearns, Culture Convenience Club, Dominion Ventures, Hewlett-Packard, InterVest, New Media Venture Partners, UBS Capital Americas

Business Provides Web-crawling and data-extraction software for the creation of databases, initially for job listings from company home pages."


June 27, 2000  PC Magazine

A Job Seeker's Guide

" Challenging Monster.com as the Internet's biggest job site is newcomer FlipDog.com, which uses new technology to cull job listings directly from employers' corporate sites in addition to charging employers for job postings. Its step-by-step method of seaching is easy to use and gives you thenumberof job listings available as you narrow your search parameters.

FlipDog.com: This huge site brings you job listings straight from companies' corporate sites and gives you a running tally of the available jobs at each step of your search."


June 19, 2000  Washingtonpost.com

WhizBang! Labs Technology and FlipDog.com Looked at by WallStreet; Brian Flynn, Financial Reporter for the Wall Street Reporter Interviews CEO

" PROVO, Utah--(Business Wire)--June 19, 2000--WhizBang! Labs (TM) Inc., the creator of FlipDog.com(TM) and the leading provider of Web-based data identification and extraction technology, catches the eye of Wall Street.

Bob Sherwin, chief executive officer and President was interviewed Friday by Brian Flynn of the Wall Street Reporter Magazine. The interview can be heard online at www.wallstreetreporter.com.

WhizBang! Labs has built unique software that automatically finds and extracts application-specific data from an unlimited number of Web pages. The company has used this technology to build the Internet's largest commerical online recruiting site, FlipDog.com, where job seekers can search through more than 500,000 jobs gathered from nearly 50,000 employers' own Web sites.

WhizBang! Labs recently announced its completion of a $30 million round of private financing. Dominion Ventures (Dominion.com) led the round, which also included UBS Capital Americas (UBSCapital.com), Hewlett-Packard Co. (NYSE: HWP), Bear Stearns (BearSterans.com), Spiral and Stars (SpiralStar.com), a wholly owned subsidiary of Sotsu, the parent corporation of Culture Convenience CLub (CCC.co.jp), InterVest I, New Media Venture Partners (NMVP.com), and certain existing individual investors.

The Wall Street Repot provides unbiased information to investors looking for secure and worthwhile investment opportunities.

About WhizBang! Labs

Founded in early 1999, WhizBang! Labs www.whizbanglabs.com has built unique software that automatically finds and extracts application-specfific data from an unlimited number of Web pages.

WhizBang! Labs is currently working with multiple strategic partners to provide them with similar dominant content advantages in other applications and vertical markets. WhizBang! Labs and FlipDog.com are trademarks of WhizBang! Labs Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners."


June 14, 2000  Computer Shopper, by Lori Grunin

Dogging for Jobs

" We've got bots that shop and bots that keep us up-to-date; bots that help developers debug and bots that play games. So it was only a matter of time before we'd have bots pounding the pavement for jobs. FlipDog.com, which launched in mid-April, craws the Web weekly tofindthe latest jobs posted by more than 50,000 companies worldwide.

Based on technology from WhizBang Labs, FlipDog.com only craws corporate sites. It filters out multiple-job sites such as Monster.com and HotJobs.com, with the goals of displaying more "real" jobs (in contrast to recruiter-posted ones) and providing a more complete picture of a company's openings. It parses the crawled pages to create an aggregate job database that users search using a simple. wizard-like interface.

And it's free, for both job seekers and posters. FlipDog.com plans to make money by selling ad spots to large firms with a lot of jobs to fill, as well as keyword-driven spots for smaller firsms. HR people post the advertising materials themselves, using a model that president Robert Sehrwin regers to as "self-serv advertising.""


June 13, 2000  Computer Shopper, by David English

Jobs and Internships

"Whether you want to be a fighter pilot, fingerprint-ID expert, cryptography hacker, or Zamboni driver, you'll probably find your kind of job at FlipDog.com. At press time, the site had 502,178 positions available from 48,981 employers. FlipDog.com claims to have the largest database of current job openings, because itssearchengine extracts job listings from virtually every employer's Web site."


June 7, 2000  PC World

Site to See: FlipDog.com

"If Your Boss won't toss you the bones you want, perhaps it's time to serve a new master. Visit FlipDog.com, which boasts more than 500,000 open jobs from almost 50,000 employers. FlipDog.com uses a proprietary search technology to sniff out job postings from employer Web sites. Job listings are housed in a huge, easy-to-search database, and the site providespersonalizedautomated Job-Hunters. One caution:  All that info can be overwhelming."


June 7, 2000  ecruitingbusiness

FlipDog parent hits pay dirt (funding)

"WhizBang! Labs, the Provo UT-based company that created mega job aggregator FlipDog.com, said June 5 it completed a $30 million financing round led by Dominion Ventures and including UBS Capital Americas, Hewlett-Packard Co. and Bear Stearns, among others. In addition to participating in the equity financing, HP has agreed to provide a $10 million credit line to WhizBang! for the purchase of HP products and services and other general corporate purposes."


June 6, 2000  The Salt Lake Tribune, by Guy Boulton

WhizBang! Raises $30 Million in  Venture Capital

" WhizBang! Labs Inc., a Provo start-up company that has developed a search engine capable of pulling specific information from Web sites, has raised $30 million in venture-capital funding. The investing group, led by Dominion Ventures, includes UBS Capital Americas, Hewlett-Packard Co., Bear Stearns and New Media Venture Partners Inc. WhizBang! has used its technology to build its online job site, FlipDOg.com, pulling information on job openings from other sites. FlipDog, launched on April 3, contains more than 500,000 jobs gathered from nearly 50,000 employers' Web sites. WhizBang! used the site to showcase its technology and is now talking to other prosepective partners. "We are just getting going," said Brett Walker, WhizBang!'s vice president of marketing. The funding announced Monday is WhizBang!'s second round. The company inititally raised $5 million from New Media and private investors. New Media, a venture-capital company based in Midvale, remains WhizBang!'s largest outside stockholder. It also made the contact with Domion Ventures, knowing the Silicon Valley firm could attact investors who could open doors for WhizBang!. "You want to expand the network," said Mark Schaeffer, New Media's  vice president of marketing. Dominion has backed other Utah companies, including Myriad Genetics Inc., PowerQuest Corp., PointClick.com Inc. and PerfectPracticeMD. WhizBang! was founded in May 1999 by members of Brigham Young University's faculty, including Dallan Quass, one of the founders of Junglee Corp. Junglee, which developed database technology that made it easier for people to find merchandise on the Internet, was bough by Amazon.com Inc. in 1998 for 1.6 million sharesofstock, worth about $173.2 million when the deal was announced."


June 5, 2000  Wall Street Journal

WhizBang! Labs Secures $30 Million in Funding

"WhizBang! Labs Inc., Provo, Utah, the creator of FlipDog.com and a provider of Web-based data indentification and extraction technology, completed a $30 million round of private financing. Dominion Ventures led the round, which also included UBS Capital Americas, Hewlett-Packard Co., Bear Stearns, SPiral and Stars, InterVest I, New Media Venture Partners and certain exising individual investors. Founded in early 1999, WhizBang! Labs (www.whizbanglabls.com) makes software that automatically findsandextracts application-specific data from an unlimited number of Web pages."


April 26, 2000  PC Magazine

PC Magazine's Top 100 Web Sites Include FlipDog.com

"The first update of our Top 100 list this year features two new categories: sites that offer opinions and expert advice, and sites and services that add functionality to your browser. More than ever, our list proves that much of our daily lives is moving online... you'll find sites and services that we feel are especially useful and well designed and that deliver on the promises they make...

FlipDog.com doesn't sit around waiting for companies to advertise their job openings; it just goes out and finds them, using spiders to scour corporate sites and grab every job listing they can find. At launch it had already found and listed over 300,000 jobs from more than 30,000 companies. If you're listing available jobs on your site, chances are that FlipDog is listing them for you as well, even if you don't know it."


April 24, 2000  myjobsearch.com

Myjobsearch.com ranks FlipDog.com #1

"FlipDog.com was recently ranked #1 by myjobsearch.com. The FlipDog.com search engine which is powered by Whizbang! Labs technology received 'A' ratings in Ease of Use and Search Results. According to myjobsearch.com, FlipDog.com ranked higher on ease of use, more targeted search results, and received top marks for their privacy policy within three weeks of launching. FlipDog.com scored an overall 'A-' rating."


April 17, 2000  Interactive Week

Fast Facts

"Execs claim the name brings a 'dose of light-hearted reality to Internet recruiting.' ...FlipDog.com uses new technology from WhizBang! Labs (www.whizbang.com) to pull jobs directly from employer sites..."


April 6, 2000  Research Buzz newsletter

Job Search Engine FlipDog Launches

"Job search engine FlipDog.com ( http://www.flipdog.com/ ) announced its launch yesterday, claiming that its site holds over 511,000 jobs from almost 50,000 employers.... Where else are you going to find opportunities to be a doorstop, a monster, or a volunteer for Koko the gorilla's foundation?..."


April 5, 2000  e-cruitingbusiness, by Joanne Wiberg

FlipDog.com job bot negates fees

"Powered by a proprietary data-search bot from WhizBang! Labs, just-launched e-cruitment site FlipDog.com houses a database containing jobs automatically gathered from employer Web sites and resumes aggregated from across the Web. The site has more jobs and resumes than some of the Internet recruitment industry's highest-flying Web sites. Management says staffing companies will soon be able to use the service, which unlike most job boards is free to both employers and job seekers."


April 5, 2000  InternetWorld, by Tom Perrotta

New Job Board Asks, 'Why Pay for Job Postings?'

"If your company has job openings, they're probably listed at FlipDog.com. Will this cost you anything and should you be concerned? No and no. Should you ask Monster.com for a big discount? Maybe....

...FlipDog, a Whizbang Labs startup based in Provo, Utah, regularly prowls the corporate pages of the Web, lifting available jobs as it goes and compressing them into a database. The company claims to list more than 500,000 jobs from almost 45,000 employers, and CEO Bob Sherwin wants to bump the employer number up to about 80,000. FlipDog plans to make money from advertising, all of which will be career related....

...FlipDog and any future companies like it may be able to force competitors like Monster.com to lower prices or even eliminate fees -- if they can attract a large enough audience."


April 4, 2000  Gazette

Web of jobs Sourcing 25,000 employers

"...FlipDog.com uses technology that automatically finds and extracts jobs from an unlimited number of employers' Web sites. The Provo, Utah-based company claims its site displays 250,000 jobs from more than 25,000 employers. Users on the site can search for a position by location, industry or company. 'This technology lets us provide employers the Internet's only zero-cost, zero-effort job posting service on what will soon be the Web's largest commercial job site,' said President Bob Sherwin...."


April 4, 2000  Wall Street Journal, by Rachelle Silverman

Postings Postings

"Recruitment advances further online, with electronic devices called 'bots' cruising the Internet to cull job listings from employers' Web sites. Unlike conventional job boards, where businesses pay for postings, the bots grab vacancies from sites of employers of all sizes and then post them for free....

FlipDog.com, which launches its Web site (www.flipdog.com) this week, says it has already assembled listings from about 50,000 employers. Rivals are developing similar products...says CEO Robert Sherwin...."


April 3, 2000  Yahoo! Finance company press release

FlipDog.com Jumps to the Top in Online Jobs; New Technology Leaps Over Industry Leaders

"FlipDog.com today announced it has launched its online job site with over 511,000 jobs from nearly 50,000 unique employers. Powered by new technology from WhizBang! Labs, the FlipDog.com database contains the largest collection of jobs on the Internet gathered from employers' own Web sites...."


March 31, 2000  Bridge.com by, Wendy Gillman

Bridge News Commentary

"An employment site will launch Monday that could send other online job sites into a tailspin. While most newspapers are concerned about online employment sites poaching their profitable advertising, FlipDog may steal the online players' bone....

...Second, it has the potential of making the rest of the industry, including its nimble online competitors, looking like dogs. Just compare it to the industry's darling: Monster.com. Monster.com currently has 11% fewer listings with 385,248 jobs. CareerPath, whose newspaper owners include the classified-rich The New York Times Co., The Washington Post Com., Tribune Co., The Times Mirror Co. and Gannett, lists a limp 300,066 ads. 'Monster should be scared,' said Charlene Li, a Forrester Research analyst...."


March 27, 2000  ADWEEK & BRANDWEEK, by Ann M. Mack

Jake of All Trades

"...Unleashing its Web site later this week, online employment recruiter FlipDog.com hopes to capitalize on the burgeoning online job market....

...All of the advertising options are self-service, e-commerce enabled, meaning employers can build, schedule, and pay for advertising online....

...FlipDog will contact job seekers and human resources representatives via e-mail to publicize its service...."


March 22, 2000  (April 18th edition) PC Magazine, by dw

Job Listings from Everywhere.

"Does the world really need another job listing site? FlipDog.com thinks so, and its approach is stunningly different from that of its competitors. Rather than charge employers to post their listings, FlipDog.com uses crawlers to find listings at corporate sites all over the Web and then suck them into a huge database...."


March 22, 2000  LA Times, Seattle Times, Victoria Advocate Online, by Joyce Lain Kennedy

New Site Fetched Record Numbers of Jobs

"...Among commercial Web sites, the record goes to FlipDog.com. A start-up now in Beta release that officially launches March 31, FlipDog has passes its nearest competitor in the number of employers recruiting for jobs online. Already stocked with a quarter-million jobs from 25,000 employers, CEO Robert Sherwin says the company expects to serve up half-a-million jobs from 50,000 employers by launch date....

...How did the new site fatten so fast? Machine-learning technology regularly scours the Web with a software bot, also called crawler or spider, automatically nabbing all the jobs on employers' own Web sites...."


March 22, 2000  CBS Marketwatch By Frank Barnako

FlipDog.com harvests other job sites

" ...FlipDog.com said its Web site uses technology which automatically finds and extracts jobs from an unlimited number of employers' Web sites. The Provo, Utah-based company claims its site displays 250,000 jobs from more than 25,000 employers. Users on the site can search for a position by location, industry or company. 'This technology lets us provide employers the Internet's only zero-cost, zero-effort job posting service on what will soon be the Web's largest commercial job site,' said Bob Sherwin, president...."


March 16, 2000  Deseret News, by Lois M. Collins

Coming soon: massive search engine for job listings

"...In what's being called the 'second generation of the Web,' a Provo company now 'crawls' through corporate Internet job listings to extract information it can post on its Web site....

...Whizbang! Labs announced the beta release of FlipDog.com, which boasts it has 25 times the jobs listings of its largest online competitor....

...Companies that keep their employment needs updated on their own Web sites will automatically be listed on FlipDog.com. Whizbang! Labs has developed a search engine that finds job listings and copies the information to the FlipDog.com Web site...."


March 14, 2000  Electronic Recruiting News, by John Sumser

Dog Flippin' Cool

"...But they have a helluva play with branding, interface design and technology. We believe that the team at Whizbang! Labs (the parent of FlipDog) has hit a resounding home run that will shake up the expectations of job hunters, employers and market analysts alike. Out of the box and forward looking, the company's positioning and delivery distinctly raises the bar for the rest of the players at the national level. The site at FlipDog.com goes a long way towards setting a design standard for non-regional job services. While we don't think that the long term money is in global recruiting, the FlipDog approach makes it really easy to traverse the ground between 'everything in the universe' (global) and 'stuff I care about' (regional). Any player who wants to stay in the game will be forced to copy or improve upon FlipDog's deliciously helpful job wizard...."


March 10, 2000  Labor Days, Thomas Weisel Partners, by H. Perry Boyle, Jr., CFA

FlipDog.com

"FlipDog.com (Private): Announced it has developed new technology which automatically finds and extracts jobs from an unlimited number of employer Web sites. This is the kind of 'bot' technology we have been talking about in Labor Daze....

...We've been predicting that the bots would be coming for months now, and the job boards may be ill prepared...."


March 9, 2000  Washington Post, Orlando Sentinel, Arizona Republic, Denver Gazette, smh.com.au, by Leslie Walker

Job 'bot' negates fees

"WASHINGTON---In the Internet's relentless race to drive the cost of doing business down to zero, perhaps no category is more rough and tumble than online employment listings. Now the competition could intensify with the debut of a new player....

...FlipDog.com bounded onto the Net this week for a trial romp - its official launch is March 31 - with an automated software 'bot' that scours the Web every seven days, grabbing all the job listings and resumes it can find....

...The company says it will do for free what market leader Monster.com charges employers hundreds of dollars to do - post their job openings online. FlipDog also plans a resume-crawler that will scour the Web, collecting resume information and let employers search that for free, too...."


March 9, 2000  Yahoo! Finance printed company press release

FlipDog.com Rockets to #1 in Online Recruiting; Beta Site Uses Technology to Leap Over Current Industry Leaders

"FlipDog.com today announced it has developed new technology which automatically finds the extracts jobs from an unlimited number of employer Web sites. With the site's official beta release today, FlipDog.com has surpassed its nearest competitor by more than three times-already visiting, extracting, and displaying jobs from more than 25,000 employers...."


 
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