(Word 6.0 version)

 

 

 

GENERAL REFERENCE BOOK

DEPARTMENT OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL

 

JUNE 2000

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

MINISTRY OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL *

A. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE *

B. MINISTRY OVERVIEW *

C. 2000/2001 MINISTRY RESOURCE LEVELS *

D. BIOGRAPHIES – SENIOR MINISTRY OFFICIALS *

E. STATUTORY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SOLCITOR GENERAL CANADA *

F. STATUTORY TABLING REQUIREMENTS *

THE DEPARTMENT OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL *

G. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE *

H. DEPARTMENTAL OVERVIEW *

I. FINANCIAL OVERVIEW AND BASIC RESOURCING *

J. BIOGRAPHIES – SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL OFFICIALS *

K. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL ACT *

L. DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEES *

M. FUNDING PROGRAMS FOR NATIONAL VOLUNTARY AGENCIES *

N. KEY STAKEHOLDERS *

O. PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES *

P. FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL-TERRITORIAL (FPT) RELATIONS *

Q. INTERNATIONAL FORA *

R. SOLICITOR GENERAL CANADA 2000/2001 ESTIMATES, PART III *

S. BASIC REFERENCE MATERIALS *


JUNE 2000

MINISTRY OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL

     

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
  2.  

     

     

     

  3. MINISTRY OVERVIEW

The Ministry of the Solicitor General, which is responsible for the federal government’s role in the protection of the public and the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society, includes the Department, as well as four major agencies: Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP); Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS); Correctional Service of Canada (CSC); and the National Parole Board (NPB). It also includes three review agencies: Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee (ERC); Royal Canadian Mounted Police Public Complaints Commission (PCC); and the Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI).

The Ministry dates back to 1966, when Parliament gave the Solicitor General responsibility over the agencies. The Ministry has a budget of $3.1 billion and over 36,000 employees. Approximately 20,000 are involved in policing, and almost half of these provide services under contract to the provinces or municipalities. Other Ministry employees include penitentiary guards, parole officers, security intelligence officers, policy advisors and support staff.

  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) enforces Canadian laws, prevents crime and maintains peace, order and security. The RCMP has responsibility to: prevent, detect and investigate offenses against federal statutes; maintain law and order, and prevent, detect and investigate crime in the provinces, territories and municipalities with which the Force has a policing contract; provide investigative and protective services to other federal departments and agencies; and, provide all Canadian law enforcement agencies with specialized police training and research, forensic laboratory services, identification services and informatics technology.

  • The Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) provides security intelligence to the Government of Canada. CSIS collects, analyzes, and retains information and intelligence respecting activities that may be suspected of constituting threats to the security of Canada; reports to and advises the Government of Canada in relation to these threats; provides security assessments to departments of the Government of Canada; and, provides advice to Ministers on immigration and citizenship applications.

  • The Correctional Services of Canada (CSC) administers sentences of convicted offenders sentenced to imprisonment for two years or more. The Service provides programs and opportunities to offenders within correctional institutions and to those conditionally released to the community, to enhance their potential for successful reintegration while maintaining the control necessary for the protection of the public, staff and offenders. CSC makes recommendations to the National Parole Board (NPB) on the conditional release of offenders based on its assessments of risk, and applies appropriate controls to manage the risk that individual offenders present to the community, including potential issuance of warrants to suspend release pending further NPB review.

  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee (ERC) provides external review of certain types of grievances and formal disciplinary, discharge and demotion appeals referred to it from the RCMP. The ERC, which reports annually to Parliament through the Minister, is a neutral third party providing an independent and impartial review of cases. The Committee may institute hearings, summon witnesses, administer oaths and receive and accept such evidence or other information as the Committee sees fit. The findings and recommendations of the Chair, or Committee, are sent to the parties and the Commissioner of the RCMP.

  • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Public Complaints Commission (PCC) provides the public with a mechanism whereby complaints regarding the conduct of members of the RCMP can be reviewed in an open, independent and objective manner. The PCC provides information to the public regarding its existence and mandate, reviews complaints from the public regarding the conduct of members of the RCMP in the performance of their duties, investigates complaints, holds public hearings to inquire into complaints, prepares reports, including findings and recommendations, and conducts research and policy development to improve the public complaints process. The Chair submits to the Minister an annual report of the activities of the Commission and its recommendations, if any, for tabling before Parliament.

  • The Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI) conducts investigations into the problems of federal offenders related to decisions, recommendations, acts or omissions of the Commissioner of Corrections or any person under the control and management of, or performing services on behalf of the Commissioner, that affect offenders, either individually or as a group. The Office of the Correctional Investigator is independent of the Correctional Service of Canada and may initiate an investigation on receipt of a complaint by or on behalf of an offender, at the request of the Solicitor General or on its own initiative. The Correctional Investigator reports annually, through the Minister, to Parliament.

  • In addition, there are two statutory review bodies of CSIS:

  • The Office of the Inspector General of CSIS (IG of CSIS), which forms part of the Department, is a statutory review body which supports the Solicitor General in relation to his responsibilities for CSIS. The role of the Inspector General is to monitor the Service’s compliance with its operational policies, to review its operational activities and to provide reports to the Solicitor General. This includes a yearly certificate attesting to the Inspector General’s satisfaction with CSIS’ Annual Report and compliance with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act and Ministerial directions.

  • The Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIRC), which does not form a part of the Ministry, is a non-partisan committee of Privy Councilors that conducts independent external review of CSIS as mandated by the Canadian Security Intelligence Act to: review CSIS performance of its duties and functions; investigate and report on complaints with respect to "any act or thing done" by the Service; and, investigate complaints concerning denials of security clearances, and denials of citizenship or immigration status based on security considerations. Under section 53, SIRC must provide the Solicitor General with an Annual Report, which the Minister must then table in Parliament. Section 54 also permits SIRC to furnish the Solicitor General with special reports, either on its own initiative or at the Minister's request.

  •  

       

    1. 2000/2001 MINISTRY RESOURCE LEVELS
    2. ($ Millions)

      Organization

      Budget

      FTE

      RCMP

      1,446.9

      *19,793

      CSC

      1,364.3

      13,793

      CSIS

      174.6

      2,065

      NPB

      27.1

      331

      Department

      Secretariat

       

      26.2

       

      219

      FNPP Contributions

      57.6

       

      RCMP PCC

      4.1

      34

      OCI

      1.8

      17

      RCMP ERC

      0.8

      5

       

      Total

       

      3,103.4

       

      36,257

      * FTEs include approximately 11,475 employees under contract policing with provinces and municipalities.

       

       

    1. BIOGRAPHIES – SENIOR MINISTRY OFFICIALS

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Nicole Jauvin

    On June 19, 2000, Ms. Nicole Jauvin was appointed Deputy Solicitor General.

    Me Nicole Jauvin a �t� nomm�e sous-solliciteur g�n�ral le 19 juin 2000.

    Prior to her appointment, Ms. Jauvin was Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council and Counsel, Privy Council Office since June 1997. In that position she provided support to the Prime Minister of Canada, the Deputy Prime Minister, the Senate and House Leaders and the Clerk of the Privy Council. Her duties were to provide legal counsel and support on a range of issues related to the Prime Minister’s prerogatives, the organization of government and ministerial mandates and responsibilities, as well as management of the government’s priorities in the House of Commons and Senate. Ms. Jauvin was vice-chair of the Public Management Committee of the OECD from 1997 to 2000.

    Avant sa nomination, Mme Jauvin �tait sous-greffier du Conseil priv� et conseiller juridique, au bureau du Conseil priv�, depuis juin 1997. Dans le cadre de ses fonctions, elle a appuy� le premier ministre du Canada, le vice premier ministre, les leaders du gouvernement en Chambre et au S�nat et le greffier du Conseil priv�. Elle a donn� des conseils de nature juridique sur toutes les questions touchant les pr�rogatives du premier ministre, l’organisation du gouvernement, les mandats des ministres ainsi que celles ayant trait � la gestion des priorit�s du gouvernement � la Chambre des communes et au S�nat. Mme Jauvin a �t� vice-pr�sidente du comit� sur la gestion publique de l’OCDE de 1997 � 2000.

    Ms. Jauvin began her federal government career in 1980 as a Special Assistant (Legislation) in the Department of the Solicitor General Canada. Through her career, she has worked in numerous positions in the Privy Council Office including: Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government; Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Security and Intelligence; and Director, Policy and Planning Systems, Senior Personnel Secretariat.

    Mme Jauvin est entr�e au service de l’administration f�d�rale en 1980 � titre d’ajointe sp�ciale (L�gislation) au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral Canada. Au cours de sa carri�re, Mme Jauvin a occup� plusieurs postes au bureau du Conseil priv�, incluant :  secr�taire adjointe du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental; secr�taire adjointe du Cabinet, S�curit� et renseignement; et directrice, Politiques et syst�mes de planification, Secr�tariat du personnel sup�rieur.

    A graduate of the University of Ottawa, she holds a Licence in Civil Law and is a member of the Qu�bec Bar since 1983. She also holds a B.A. in Communications, a Diploma in International Cooperation, and a Diploma of graduate studies in Law.

    Dipl�m�e de l’Universit� d’Ottawa, elle d�tient une licence en droit civil et elle est membre du Barreau du Qu�bec depuis 1983. Elle d�tient aussi un Baccalaur�at en communications sociales, un dipl�me en coop�ration internationale, et un dipl�me d’�tudes sp�cialis�es en droit.

    Ms. Jauvin is married and is the mother of three children.

    Mme Jauvin est mari�e, et m�re de trois enfants.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Joseph P. R. Murray

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police Commissioner Philip Murray has led the RCMP in adopting community-based policing as its service delivery model and is a strong advocate of community justice forums. "Community policing enables us to provide quality policing to our communities by working with them to identify problems and to address their root causes instead of always being reactive," the Commissioner explains. "We are also bringing traditional Aboriginal justice philosophy into the mainstream. Through the use of diversion programs, there has been considerable success in reducing the number of youth who commit criminal offences."

    Ardent d�fenseur de la justice communautaire, le commissaire de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, Philip Murray, a fait adopter � la GRC le principe de police communautaire comme mod�le de prestation de service. �La police communautaire nous permet de fournir un service de police de qualit� � la population en travaillant avec les citoyens pour cibler les probl�mes et les r�gler � la source plut�t que d’intervenir apr�s coup, d’expliquer le Commissaire. Nous introduisons par ailleurs le principe de justice traditionnelle autochtone dans le courant de pens�e. Gr�ce au recours aux programmes de d�judiciarisation, on a r�ussi � r�duire consid�rablement le nombre d’infractions commises par des jeunes.�

    Commissioner Murray has gained extensive experience as a police officer, administrator and manager since joining the RCMP in 1962. He spent his first years on general police duty in Saskatchewan. After receiving his Bachelor of Administration with Great Distinction in 1977 from the University of Regina, he moved to Ottawa and continued to add to his knowledge of policing and the Force. He worked in a number of functions holding increasingly responsible roles. These areas included: Management Services, Planning, Program Evaluation, Protective Policing, Federal Policing, and VIP/Airport Policing.

    Le commissaire Murray a acquis une vaste exp�rience comme policier, administrateur et gestionnaire depuis qu’il s’est engag� dans la GRC en 1962. Il a pass� les quinze premi�re ann�es de sa carri�re � ex�cuter des fonctions polici�res g�n�rales en Saskatchewan. En 1977, apr�s avoir obtenu un baccalaur�at en administration, avec mention Grande distinction, � l’Universit� de Regina, il s’est �tabli � Ottawa o� il a continu� � �largir ses connaissances sur le maintien de l’ordre et la Gendarmerie. Il a assum� un certain nombre de fonctions dont les responsabilit�s �taient de plus en plus importantes, notamment dans les domaines suivants: Services de gestion, Planification, �valuation des programmes, Police de protection, Lois f�d�rales, Protection des personnes de marque et Police des a�roports.

    In 1991, he became Commanding Officer of "A" Division – the operational centre in the National Capital Region – and was appointed Deputy Commissioner Administration later that year. Following two years of service in that role, he became Deputy Commissioner Operations. With his unique combination of knowledge and experience, Philip Murray became Commissioner of the Force he had served so diligently on June 25, 1994.

    En 1991, il a �t� nomm� commandant de la Division A, le centre des op�rations dans la r�gion de la capitale nationale, puis sous-commissaire � l’Administration plus tard dans l’ann�e. Apr�s avoir rempli ce r�le pendent deux ans, il a occup� le poste de sous-commissaire � la Police op�rationnelle. Gr�ce � ses connaissances et � son exp�rience uniques, Philip Murray a �t� nomm�, le 25 juin 1994, commissaire de la Gendarmerie pour qui il avait travaill� si consciencieusement.

    During his years of service, he has won three prestigious awards: the RCMP Long Service Medal, the Canada 125 Medal, and the Order of St. John of Jerusalem. In 1997, he received his 35 year Gold Clasp and Star and was promoted to Officer Grade of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem.

    Durant ses ann�es de service, il a m�rit� trois prix prestigieux: la m�daille d’anciennet� de la GRC, la M�daille comm�morative du 125e anniversaire de la Conf�d�ration du Canada ainsi que l’Ordre de Saint-Jean. En 1997, il a re�u l’agrafe et les �toiles d’or et �t� promu au grade d’officier de l’Ordre de Saint-Jean.

    Commissioner Murray is also the Honorary Vice-President of the Royal Canadian Legion, a member of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO) Interpol. He is part of the Advisory Board for the Jack and Mae Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption and a member of the Board of Directors for the Network for Research on Crime and Justice at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. The Commissioner is also president of the Canadian Club of Ottawa and an honourary executive member of Big Brothers.

    Le commissaire Murray est �galement le vice-pr�sident honoraire de la L�gion royale canadienne, membre de l’Association canadienne des chefs de police, de l’Association internationale des chefs de police et de l’Organisation internationale de police criminelle (Interpol). Il si�ge au comit� consultatif pour le Jack and Mae Nathanson Centre for the Study of Organized Crime and Corruption et est membre du conseil d’administration pour le R�seau de recherche sur la criminalit� � l’appareil judiciaire de l’Universit� Queen � Kingston, en Ontario. Le Commissaire est aussi pr�sident du Canadian Club d’Ottawa et membre ex�cutif honoraire des Grands fr�res.

    Commissioner Murray is married to Rene and has three children Nanci, Keri and Tim, the latter two following in his footsteps as career police officers.

    Le commissaire Murray et son �pouse Rene ont eu trois enfants, Nanci, Keri et Tim, ces deux derniers ayant suivi les traces de leur p�re dans la police.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Ole M. Instrup

    BORN

    May 1941

    DATE DE NAISSANCE

    Mai 1941

    EDUCATION

    Aarhus University, Denmark

    - Degree in Philosophy

    - Master’s Degree (Law)

    - Ph.D. (Law)

    �TUDES

    Universit� Aarhus, Danemark

    - Dipl�me en philosophie

    - Ma�trise en droit

    - Doctorat en droit

    PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

    June 1996

    Commissioner of Corrections, Correctional Service of Canada

    EXP�RIENCE PROFESSIONNELLE

    Juin 1996

    Commissaire aux services correctionnels, Service correctionnel du Canada

    October 1995 - June 1996

    Senior Advisor to the Privy Council Office and Skelton-Clark Fellow at Queen’s University

    Octobre 1995 - Juin 1996

    Conseiller sup�rieur aupr�s du Bureau du Conseil priv� et charg� d’�tudes Skelton-Clark � l’Universit� Queen’s

    September 1992 - October 1995

    Principal, Canadian Centre for Management Development 

    Septembre 1992 - Octobre 1995

    Directeur du Centre, Centre canadien de gestion

    1988 – 1992

    Commissioner of Corrections, Correctional Service of Canada

    1988 - 1992

    Commissaire aux services correctionnels, Service correctionnel du Canada

    1986 – 1988

    Chairman, National Parole Board

    1986 - 1988

    Pr�sident, Commission nationale des lib�rations conditionnelles

    1983 – 1986

    Special Advisor to the Commissioner, Correctional Service of Canada

    1983 - 1986

    Conseiller sp�cial aupr�s du Commissaire, Service correctionnel du Canada

    1977 – 1983

    Representative of the Danish Government as a Member of the European Committee on Crime Problems, Council of Europe

    1977 - 1983

    Repr�sentant du gouvernement du Danemark � titre de membre du comit� europ�en sur les probl�mes reli�s au crime, Conseil de l’Europe

    1972 – 1983

    Warden, Correctional Service of Denmark

    1972 - 1983

    Directeur institutionnel, Service correctionnel du Danemark

    1973 - 1975

    Chairman, Planning Committee, Ministry of Justice, Denmark

    1973 – 1975

    Pr�sident du Comit� de planification, minist�re de la Justice, Danemark

    Fall 1972

    Visiting Professor, United Nations, Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders, Tokyo, Japan

    Automne 1972

    Professeur, Nations-Unies, Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders, Tokyo, Japon

    1969 - 1972

    Deputy Warden, Correctional Service of Denmark

    1969 - 1972

    Directeur adjoint institutionnel, Service correctionnel du Danemark

    1966 - 1969

    Assistant Professor of Law, Aarhus University

    1966 - 1969

    Professeur adjoint en Droit, Universit� Aarhus

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Willie Gibbs

    CAREER:

    Mr. Gibbs completed 35 years of public service in May 1999. After he obtained a Bachelor of Arts from St. Joseph’s University (Universit� de Moncton) and a Masters in Social Work at St. Mary’s University, he served 2 years with the Government of New Brunswick in mental health care.

    CARRI�RE

    M. Gibbs compte, depuis mai 1999, 35 ann�es de service dans la fonction publique. Apr�s avoir obtenu un Baccalaur�at �s Arts � l’Universit� St-Joseph (Universit� de Moncton) et une ma�trise en service social � l’Universit� St. Mary’s, il travaille deux ans pour le gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick dans le secteur des soins de sant� mentale.

    From 1966-1994 he was with CSC where he held various correctional operations and management positions, including correctional case worker; supervisor of classification and psychological services; Deputy Warden, Warden; Director General, Correctional Operations and Deputy Commissioner, first in the Atlantic Region and then at National Headquarters.

    En 1966, il entre au Service correcti onnel du Canada, o� il va occuper jusqu’en 1994 toute une s�rie de postes dans les op�rations et la gestion des services correctionnels. Il remplit successivement les fonctions de travailleur social, de superviseur du classement des d�tenus et des services psychologiques, de sous-directeur puis de directeur d’establissement, de directeur g�n�ral des Op�rations correctionnelles et enfin de sous-commissaire, d’abord dans la r�gion de l’Atlantique et ensuite � l’administration centrale.

    PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT & EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES:

    Over the years, he completed various Public Service development courses including the Career Assignment Program.

    PERFECTIONNEMENT PROFESSIONNEL ET ACTIVIT�S PARAPROFESSIONNELLES

    Au fil des ann�es, il suit divers cours de perfectionnement de la fonction publique, y compris le programme Cours et affectations de perfectionnement.

    From 1979 to 1985 he was an auditor with the Commission on Accreditation for Corrections (U.S. based and averaging about 2 weeks’ work a year). He conducted audits of several states’ prison systems and otherwise acted as an advisor to the Commission on the Canadian system.

    De 1979 � 1985, il remplit les fonctions de v�rificateur aupr�s de la Commission sur Accreditation pour Corrections, consacrant en moyenne deux semaines de travail par an � cet organisme am�ricain. Il effectue la v�rification des syst�mes carc�raux de plusieurs �tas et il est en outre le conseiller de la Commission pour ce qui est du syst�me canadien.

    From 1984 to 1994, he was a member of the National Joint Committee of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and the Federal Correctional Services, including 2 years as Vice-Chairman and 2 years as Chairman.

    De 1984 � 1994, il fait partie du Comit� national mixte de l'Association canadienne des chefs de police et des Services correctionnels f�d�raux, dont deux ans en tant que vice-pr�sident et deux ans � titre de pr�sident.

    In community and volunteer work, he spent many years on the Board of Directors of the Family and Children Services of Cumberland County in Nova Scotia, including six years as Chairman of its Personnel Committee, one year as Vice-President of the Society and two years as President. He also was for several years on his Church Councils, both in Amherst, Nova Scotia and Ottawa.

    Dans le secteur communautaire et b�n�vole, il si�ge pendant de nombreuses ann�es au conseil d’administration des services aux familles et � l’enfance du comt� de Cumberland en Nouvelle-�cosse: �pres avoir �t� pr�sident du comit� du personnel, il devient vice-pr�sident de la soci�t� puis il en assure la pr�sidence. Il f�t aussi pendant plusieurs ann�es sur des Comit�s paroissiaux � Amherst, Nouvelle-�cosse et � Ottawa.

    He is fluent in Canada's both official languages.

    He is married to Doreen and they have two adult daughters.

    Il s'exprime ais�ment dans les deux langues officielles du Canada.

    Il est mari� � Doreen et ils ont deux filles d’�ge adulte.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Phillipe Rabot

    Mr. Rabot is a lawyer, and has 15 years of experience on four different administrative tribunals at the federal and provincial levels.

    Monsieur Rabot est avocat: il a travaill� pendant 15 ans au sein de quatre tribunaux administratifs, aux paliers f�d�ral et provincial.

    Mr. Rabot was Vice-Chair of the Assessment Review Board of Ontario from 1993 – 1997, and Secretary of the Copyright Board of Canada from 1990 to 1993. He was previously an Appeal Board member with the Public Service Commission of Canada. He was appointed Vice-Chair of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee in July 1998 and has been acting as Chair of that tribunal since that date.

    Monsieur Rabot a assur� la vice-pr�sidence de la Commission de r�vision de l’�valuation fonci�re de l’Ontario de 1993 � 1997 et a �t� secr�taire de la Commission du droit d’auteur du Canada de 1990 � 1993. Il a pr�c�demment �t� membre de Comit�s d’appel de la Commission de la fonction publique du Canada. Il a �t� nomm� � titre de vice-pr�sident du Comit� externe d’examen de la GRC en juillet 1998, et agit depuis comme pr�sident int�rimaire.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Shirley Heafey

    Ms. Heafey joined the federal public service in 1969 and worked in the offices of the Solicitor General and the Minister of Labour for four years in various capacities.

    Mme Heafey s’est jointe � la fonction publique f�d�rale en 1969. Elle a occup� divers emplois dans les cabinets du solliciteur g�n�ral et du ministre du Travail pendant quatre ans.

    From 1978 to 1984, she was the Vice-President and Manager of Albion Auto Sales, Ottawa.

    De 1978 � 1984, elle a �t� vice-pr�sidente et g�rante d’Albion Auto Sales, � Ottawa.

    Ms. Heafey returned to the federal public service in 1985 and headed the Complaints/Appeals Section at the Security Intelligence Review Committee.

    Mme Heafey a r�int�gr� la fonction publique f�d�rale en 1985 en tant que directrice de la Section des plaintes et des appels au Comit� de surveillance des activit�s de renseignement de s�curit�.

    From 1991 until October 1997, Ms. Heafey, through her private law firm, was counsel to the City of Ottawa conducting prosecutions and civil litigation in both official languages. She was appointed to the RCMP Public Complaints Commission as Member-at-large in 1995. During this period, she served as ad hoc counsel to the Security Intelligence Review Committee.

    De 1991 � octobre 1997, par l’entremise de son cabinet d’avocats, Mme Heafey a �t� conseill�re juridique aupr�s de la ville d’Ottawa. Dans le cadre de ses fonctions, elle s’est occup�e de poursuites judiciaires et de proc�dures civiles dans les deux langues officielles. En 1995, elle a �t� nomm�e membre � titre particulier de la Commission des plaintes du public contre la GRC. Au cours de cette p�riode, elle a �galement �t� conseill�re sp�ciale aupr�s du Comit� de surveillance des activit�s de renseignement de s�curit�.

    On October 16, 1997, Ms. Heafey was appointed Chair of the RCMP Public Complaints Commission.

    Le 16 octobre 1997, Mme Heafey a �t� nomm�e pr�sidente de la Commission des plaintes du public contre la GRC.

    Ms. Heafey holds a Bachelor of Arts from St. Patrick’s College and an L.L.B. from the University of Ottawa Law School, French Common Law Program. She has two daughters in university.

    Mme Heafey poss�de un baccalaur�at �s arts du St. Patrick’s College ainsi qu’un baccalaur�at en droit de l’Universit� d’Ottawa (Section de common law – programme fran�ais, Facult� de droit). Mme Heafey a deux filles, qui fr�quentent l’universit�.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Ron Stewart

    On November 5, 1977 Mr. Stewart was appointed Correctional Investigator which appointment was made pursuant to Part II of the Inquiries Act. On November 1, 1992 he was re-appointed with the coming into force of the Corrections and Conditional Release Act. In the fall of 1998, Mr. Stewart’s appointment was renewed.

    Le 5 novembre 1977, M. Stewart a �t� nomm� Enqu�teur correctionnel, conform�ment � la partie II de la Loi sur les enqu�tes. Le 1er novembre 1992, il a de nouveau �t� nomm� � ce poste, � la suite de l’entr�e en vigueur de la Loi sur le syst�me correctionnel et la mise en libert� sous condition. La nomination de M. Stewart a �t� renouvell�e en automne 1998.

    In 1961 Mr. Stewart articled with the law firm of Fasken, Calvin after which he took the position of Executive Assistant to the Chief Electoral Officer and Representation Commissioner. He held this position until 1971 when he became a Sport Consultant to the Minister of National Health and Welfare. In 1973 he was appointed Legal Counsel to the National Sport and Recreation Centre and in 1975, was named Vice President of Sportdevco Ltd., Ottawa.

    En 1961, M. Stewart a fait un stage au cabinet d’avocats Fasken, Calvin, puis a obtenu un poste d’adjoint ex�cutif du Directeur g�n�ral des �lections et du Commissaire � la repr�sentation, poste qu’il a occup� jusqu’en 1971. Il est ensuite devenu conseiller en sports aupr�s du ministre de la Sant� nationale et du Bien-�tre social. En 1973, il a obtenu un poste de conseiller juridique au Centre national du sport et de la r�cr�ation et, en 1975, il a �t� nomm� vice-pr�sident de Sportdevco Ltd., Ottawa.

    Mr. Stewart played 13 years of Canadian professional football and keeps in shape playing golf and tennis. He is active in the University Alumni of Queen’s University and the Childrens’ Hospital Foundation and is involved in fundraising campaigns and community projects such as the Chairperson of the 1988 Grey Cup Festival and current Chairperson of the Nortel Networks Tour, a CHEO fundraiser. 

    Pendant 13 ans, M. Stewart a �t� joueur professionnel dans la ligue canadienne de football et se tient en forme en jouant au golf et au tennis. Il est membre actif du groupe d’anciens �tudiants de l’Universit� Queen’s et oeuvre pour la Fondation de l’h�pital pour enfants. Il participe � des campagnes de lev�es de fonds et � des projets communautaires, notamment en tant que pr�sident du Festival de la Coupe Grey en 1988 et que pr�sident actuel du Tour Nortel Networks, une activit� de lev�e de fonds au profit de l’HEEO.

    Mr. Stewart was born in Toronto, Ontario on September 25, 1934 and attended Earl Haig Elementary School and Riverdale Collegiate in Toronto. He is a graduate of Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario having obtained a B.A., B.P.H.E. and the University of Ottawa with an LL.B.

    M. Stewart est n� � Toronto (Ontario) le 25 septembre 1934 et a fait ses �tudes � l’Earl Haig Elementary School et au Riverdale Collegiate � Toronto. Il a obtenu un baccalaur�at �s arts et un baccalaur�at, �ducation physique et sant�, � l’Universit� Queen’s � Kingston (Ontario) et un baccalaur�at en droit � l’Universit� d’Ottawa.

    Mr. Stewart married Wendy Elizabeth Thomas in 1975 and they have two children, a daughter, graduated from Queen’s University in 1998 and a son, accepted at Queen’s University in 1999.

    M. Stewart a �pous� Wendy Elizabeth Thomas en 1975 et est p�re de deux enfants, une fille, gradu�e de l’Universit� Queen’s en 1998 et un fils, accept� � l’Universit� Queen’s en 1999.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Maurice Archdeacon

    On 1 September 1999 Mr. Maurice D. Archdeacon was appointed Inspector General of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

    Le 1er septembre 1999, M. Maurice Archdeacon a �t� nomm� inspecteur g�n�ral du Service canadien du renseignement de s�curit�.

    Born in Liverpool, England in 1934, Mr. Archdeacon was educated at St. Edward’s College and the University of London. He attended the Aerospace Systems Course in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1962, Staff College in Toronto in 1968, and Post Graduate Management at Monterey, California in 1974.

    N� � Liverpool (Angleterre) en 1934, M. Archdeacon a fait ses �tudes au St. Edward's College et � la University of London. En 1962, il a suivi le Cours sur les syst�mes a�rospatiaux offert � Winnipeg (Manitoba). Il a �tudi� au Coll�ge d'�tat-major � Toronto en 1968 et, en 1974, a fait des �tudes sup�rieures en gestion � Monterey (Californie).

    After several years as a pilot, flying instructor, and staff officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force, Mr. Archdeacon was appointed as Executive Assistant to the Chief of the Defence Staff in 1975. In 1980, at the rank of Brigadier General, he was appointed Chef de Cabinet to the Chairman of the Military Committee at NATO Headquarters in Bruxelles.

    Apr�s avoir pass� plusieurs ann�es dans l'Aviation royale du Canada, � titre de pilote, d'instructeur de vol et d'officier d'�tat-major, M. Archdeacon a �t� nomm� chef de cabinet du chef d'�tat-major de la D�fense en 1975. En 1980, avec le grade de brigadier-g�n�ral, il est devenu chef de cabinet du pr�sident du Comit� militaire au si�ge de l'OTAN � Bruxelles.

    In 1983 Mr. Archdeacon was appointed Deputy Assistant Secretary, Defence and Foreign Policy in the Privy Council Office. In 1984 he was a member of Prime Minister Trudeau’s Task Force for the Peace Initiative.

    En 1983, M. Archdeacon a �t� nomm� sous-secr�taire adjoint de la Politique �trang�re et de la D�fense au Bureau du Conseil priv�. En 1984, il est devenu membre du groupe de travail du premier ministre Trudeau pour l'initiative de paix.

    In 1985, Mr. Archdeacon was appointed Executive Director of the Security Intelligence Review Committee. He served in this capacity until August 1999.

    En 1985, M. Archdeacon a �t� nomm� directeur ex�cutif du Comit� de surveillance des activit�s du renseignement de s�curit�, poste qu'il a occup� jusqu'en ao�t 1999.

    In 1992 Mr. Archdeacon co-chaired the Canada 21 Council, which presented its findings to the Prime Minister in 1994. Mr. Archdeacon was also chair of the Canadian Council for International Peace

    En 1992, M. Archdeacon est devenu copr�sident du Conseil Canada 21, qui a pr�sent� ses constatations au premier ministre en 1994. M. Archdeacon a �galement rempli la fonction de pr�sident du Conseil canadien pour la paix et la s�curit� internationales.

     

       

    1. STATUTORY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL CANADA
    2. DOCUMENT TO FOLLOW

       

       

    1. STATUTORY TABLING REQUIREMENTS

     

    Department Access to Information Privacy

    Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s. 72(2); Privacy Act, s. 72 (2)

    Canadian Security Intelligence Service

    Annual Reports (SIRC)

    SIRC must, not later than September 30 in each fiscal year, provide an annual report to the Solicitor General detailing the activities of SIRC during the preceding fiscal year. The Solicitor General must table it on any of the first 15 days on which the House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives it.

    CSIS Act, s. 53

    Annual Report (SIRC Alternative)

    An appointed retired judge of a superior court performing the duties of the Review Committee, if the Review Committee cannot perform its duties must, not later than September 30 in each fiscal year, submit to the Solicitor General of Canada a report of the activities of the person during the preceding fiscal year and the Solicitor General of Canada must table it on any of the first 15 days on which the House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives it.

    Citizenship Act, s. 19.3
    Immigration Act, s 39.3 & 81.3

    Firearms

    Registrar’s Annual Report

    The Registrar shall, as soon as possible after the end of the calendar year, submit an annual report to the Solicitor General. The Solicitor General shall table the report on any of the first 15 days on which the House is sitting after the Solicitor General receives it or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days that Parliament resumes sitting.

    Firearms Act s.93

    National Parole Board

    Access to Information and Privacy: Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s. 72(2); Privacy Act, s. 72 (2)

    Office of the Correctional Investigator

    Access to Information and Privacy: Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s 72(2); 
    Privacy Act, s. 72 (2)

    Annual & Special Reports

    The Correctional Investigator must, within 3 months after the end of each fiscal year, submit an anuual report to the Solicitor General describing the activities of his or her office during the year. The Solicitor General must table the report before each House of Parliament on any of the first thirty days on which that House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives the report.

    Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA), s. 192

     

    With respect to urgent matters, the Correctional Investigator may, at any time, make a special report to the Solicitor General. The Solicitor General must table these reports before each House of Parliament on any of the first thirty days on which that House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives the report.

    CCRA, s. 193

    Corrections

    Annual Report

    On or before the 31st day of January next following end of fiscal year or, if Parliament not sitting, on any of the first 5 days next that Parliament is sitting.

    CCRA, s. 95

    Access to Information and Privacy: Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s. 72(2); Privacy Act, s. 72(2)

    Electronic Surveillance

    Annual Report respecting authorizations

    Forthwith upon completion or, if Parliament not sitting, on any of the first 15 days next that Parliament is sitting.

    Criminal Code of Canada s. 195

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police

    Access to Information and Privacy: Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s. 72(2); Privacy Act, s. 72(2)

    Superannuation Account: Actuarial Report

    In accordance with the Public Pensions Reporting Act.

    RCMP Superannuation Act, s. 30

    Arrangements with local governments for use of the RCMP-RCMP Policing Contracts

    Within 15 days after made, or if Parliament not sitting, on any of the first 15 days next that Parliament is sitting.

    RCMP Act, s. 20(5)

    Superannuation: Annual Report on Part I

     

    RCMP Superannuation Act, s. 31

    RCMP Public Complaints Commission

    Access to Information and Privacy: Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s. 72(2); Privacy Act, s. 72(2)

    Annual Report

    PCC Chairperson, within 3 months after the end of each fiscal year, submit an annual report to the Solicitor General detailing the activities and recommendations of the Commission during the year. The Solicitor General must table a copy of the report before each House of Parliament on any of the first 15 days on which that House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives it.

    RCMP Act, s. 45.34

    RCMP External Review Committee

    Access to Information and Privacy: Annual Reports

    Within 3 months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if Parliament is not then sitting, on any of the first 15 days next thereafter that Parliament is sitting.

    Access to Information Act, s. 72(2); Privacy Act, s. 72 (2)

    Annual Report

    The Committee Chairperson must, within 3 months after the end of each fiscal year, submit an annual report to the Solicitor General detailing the activities and recommendations of the Committee during the year. The Solicitor General must table a copy of the report before each House of Parliament on any of the first 15 days on which that House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives it.

    RCMP Act. s. 30

    Security Intelligence Review Committee

    Annual Report of the activities of the SIRC

    The Minister shall cause a copy of the report sent by the Chairperson of the SIRC (before the commencement of each fiscal year) on the activities in the preceding year to be laid before Parliament on any of the first 15 days on which the House is sitting.

     

    Witness Protection Program

    Annual Report

    The Commissioner shall, no later than June 30 in each fiscal year, provide an annual report to the Solicitor General. The Solicitor General must table it on any of the first 15 days on which the House is sitting after the day the Solicitor General receives it.

    Witness Protection Program Act, s. 16

     

    THE DEPARTMENT OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL

     

    1. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
    2.  

       

       

    1. DEPARTMENTAL OVERVIEW

    INTRODUCING THE DEPARTMENT:

    The Department is part of the Ministry of the Solicitor General, which together with its partners in criminal justice and security, is responsible for the protection of the public and the maintenance of a just, peaceful and safe society.

    In addition to the Department (which includes the Office of the Inspector General, CSIS), the Ministry is made up of four agencies and three review bodies. The agencies are the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and the National Parole Board (NPB). The review bodies are the RCMP External Review Committee (ERC), the RCMP Public Complaints Commission (PCC) and the Office of the Correctional Investigator (OCI). Together, these organizations have a combined budget of $3.1 billion and over 36,000 employees.

    The creation of the Department of the Solicitor General in 1966 was based on the need to provide stronger support to the Solicitor General in providing effective direction to the agencies. To this end, the Department advises and assists the Solicitor General in discharging his responsibilities for:

    The Department promotes and helps to maintain a Canadian society in which all persons can feel protected from threats to personal and national security and from infringements upon their rights and freedoms. The level, complexity, and cross-jurisdictional nature of these issues require the Department to work closely with its partners in the criminal justice system. These include the Ministry agencies, Justice Canada (which has primary responsibility for federal criminal justice policy), as well as provincial and territorial governments, First Nation governments and other partners.

    The Department is headed by the Deputy Solicitor General (DSG) and its roles and responsibilities derive from the Deputy’s responsibility to provide advice and support to the Solicitor General on all aspects of his mandate. The Department is organized as follows:

     

    COMPONENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT:

    Policing and Security Branch:

    The Policing and Security Branch is responsible for the provision of policy advice to the Minister, through the Deputy Solicitor General, both on policing and national security matters. It is comprised of two directorates: a) Policing and Law Enforcement; and, b) National Security.

    a) Policing and Law Enforcement Directorate (PLED):

    Role And Function: The Policing and Law Enforcement Directorate provides advice on a wide range of policy issues in support of the Minister’s, national leadership in policing and law enforcement in Canada and responsibility for providing effective direction to the RCMP.

    The Policing and Law Enforcement Directorate provides the Minister with:

    Organization: The Policing and Law Enforcement Directorate has 28 employees working in three divisions: Law Enforcement, Anti-Organized Crime, and Policing.

    The Law Enforcement Division is responsible for:

    The Anti-Organized Crime Division is responsible for:

    The Policing Policy Division is responsible for the:

    1. National Security Directorate (NSD):

    Role and Function: The Department of the Solicitor General assumes the lead role in the planning, coordination and implementation of the Government’s national security policies.

    The National Security Directorate (NSD) provides advice and support to the Solicitor General in his direction, control and accountability for CSIS and the security functions of the RCMP. To this end, NSD supports the Minister with policy advice respecting his responsibilities for the accountability and review instruments and framework set out in the CSIS Act. In carrying out its responsibility for the development of independent policy advice, the Directorate consults with Ministry agencies and other federal departments and agencies, and with the provinces and agencies of foreign governments as appropriate.

    NSD provides policy advice to the Minister regarding the impact of evolving information and communication technologies on lawful intercept and search and seizure, and on Canada’s critical infrastructures.

    NSD is also responsible for the development and implementation of the National Counter-Terrorism Plan as well as coordinating the federal response to terrorist threats.

    Organization: The National Security Directorate has 14 employees working in two divisions: Security Policy Division and Counter-Terrorism Division.

    The Security Policy Division is responsible for providing ongoing independent advice to the Minister and the Deputy Solicitor General:

    The Counter-Terrorism Division, in support of the Minister’s lead responsibility for coordinating counter-terrorism measures, ensures that:

     

    Corrections and Aboriginal Policing Branch:

    Corrections and Aboriginal Policing Branch is responsible for the provision of policy advice to the Minister, through the Deputy Solicitor General, both on specific criminal justice, corrections, conditional release and aboriginal policing matters. It is comprised of two directorates: a) Corrections; and, b) Aboriginal Policing.

    1. Corrections Directorate:

    Role and Function: The Corrections Directorate provides advice and support to the Solicitor General in his direction of the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and in his accountability to Parliament for the National Parole Board (NPB).

    The Directorate is therefore responsible for providing advice to the Solicitor General on:

    To support the Minister in his public policy leadership role in the corrections area, the Directorate works with CSC and NPB to develop research-based policy initiatives aimed at addressing the requirements for a more effective, efficient and accountable federal corrections system. In consultation with other levels of government, departments and non-government organizations, the Directorate develops legislative and policy initiatives that are inter-jurisdictional in scope. Further, the Directorate works with CSC, NPB, the Department of Justice and the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development on innovations and adaptations of the correctional system with respect to Aboriginal peoples.

    The Directorate conducts research and development aimed at providing sound, empirical information to support policy development in priority corrections areas for the Department and the Ministry.

    Organization: The Corrections Directorate has 20 employees working in two divisions: Corrections Policy, and Corrections Research and Development.

    Current priorities include high-risk offenders, alternatives to incarceration, community corrections and treatment, restorative justice and Aboriginal corrections.

    The key Departmental strategies within the responsibility of the Corrections Directorate are:

    b) Aboriginal Policing Directorate:

    Role and Function: The Aboriginal Policing Directorate (APD) is responsible for the implementation of the First Nations Policing Policy (FNPP) through the negotiation, administration, maintenance and evaluation of tripartite agreements for First Nations policing services.

    To this end, APD:

    Organization: The APD has 29 FTE’s and is comprised of headquarters staff and Regional Managers. The organization operates as follows:

     

    Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice (SPIJ) Directorate:

    Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice Directorate (SPIJ) provides support to the Solicitor General, and the Deputy Solicitor General, in their responsibilities for portfolio and departmental policy, planning, and coordination. SPIJ works to help the Minister and the Deputy Minister fulfill their mandate to manage and coordinate the business of the portfolio as a whole on behalf of the Government. The Directorate was created in August 1999 by merging two former directorates: Policy Planning and Coordination Directorate and Integrated Justice Information Directorate.

    SPIJ is composed of three Divisions:

    The Portfolio Policy and Coordination Division provides portfolio management related to policy planning in order to develop and advance Ministry priorities. In doing so, it works in close cooperation and consultation with other directorates of the department, the ministry agencies, other federal departments (especially the Department of Justice), and central agencies. The Division also gathers and monitors research and undertakes environmental scanning that indicates trends and gaps in the criminal justice system to feed Ministry planning. As well, the division develops performance indicators that can be mapped to agency work and to that of partners.

    The Partnerships and Citizenship Engagement Division provides a focal point of support for the consultations, partnerships and citizen engagement initiatives that advance the priorities of the Ministry. The Division coordinates these activities in support of Ministry and Departmental policy planning and facilitates collaboration with National Voluntary Organizations (NVOs), providing funding to 14 such organizations. The Division supports a number of consultative fora, including the National Joint Committee of Senior Criminal Justice Officials, which necessitates close cooperation with the other directorates of the Department, the Ministry Agencies, central agencies and other federal departments, Provincial and Territorial officials responsible for criminal justice and organizations and representatives of the private and voluntary sectors.

    The Integrated Justice Information Division is responsible for providing ongoing leadership, technical, policy and research support in the pursuit of the integration of federal criminal justice information systems, enabling critical information sharing, and positioning criminal justice agencies to act effectively to achieve program objectives. This Division supports the Interdepartmental Working Group and the Interdepartmental Steering Committee on Integrated Justice Information, which aim to promote the coordination of information management and system development efforts within the federal government and with provincial and territorial initiatives. The Integrated Justice Information (IJI) Action Plan, endorsed by the Steering Committee, proposes the creation of a Canada Public Safety Information Network (CPSIN) serving as the basis for a modern Canada-wide network of information, linking criminal justice agencies for public

    safety in Canada. CPSIN consists of five complementary components:

     

    Office of the Inspector General, CSIS:

    Role and Function: On proclamation in July 1984, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act (CSIS Act) established two review bodies: the Inspector General (IG), internal to the Government and reporting to the Solicitor General, and the Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIRC), external to the Government and reporting to Parliament.

    The Office of the Inspector General (OIG), which began operations in 1985, is independent of CSIS and forms part of the Department of the Solicitor General for administrative purposes. The CSIS Act makes the IG, who is appointed by the Governor in Council, responsible to the Deputy Solicitor General.

    Organization: The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has 9 employees that are located at the departmental headquarters in Ottawa.

    In effect, the IG serves as the Solicitor General’s internal auditor for CSIS, supplementing the advice he receives from the DSG with an independent means of assurance that CSIS is complying with the law, ministerial direction and operational policy. The IG’s right of access to CSIS information and his specific functions are set out in the CSIS Act. The functions are to:

    The Solicitor General may direct the IG to examine particular issues and operational activities, and has periodically done so, generally acting on the advice of the DSG.

    The Solicitor General is required by the CSIS Act to transmit both the Director’s annual report and the IG’s certificate to SIRC, which also receives copies of the reports that the IG submits to the Solicitor General on his/her reviewing and monitoring activities.

    In addition to formal reports, the IG provides ongoing advice or commentary in various forms to the Solicitor General, the Deputy Solicitor General and CSIS, in relation to compliance matters and the effectiveness of the control/accountability framework, including the directions the Solicitor General provides to CSIS under section 6 of the CSIS Act.

     

    Communications Group:

    Role and Function: The role of the Department’s Communications Group is to provide advice and support to the Solicitor General and his/her staff, the Deputy Solicitor General and the Department’s senior managers.

    It should be noted that each Ministry Agency has its own communications directorate. While the former serves the needs of the individual agencies and agencies heads, the Communications Group exists to support the Minister and the Department. It normally becomes involved in issues that are likely to require the Minister’s attention.

    Organization: The Communications Group is quite small, consisting of 12 FTEs. (Most resources devoted to communications are located within the Ministry agencies). Staff who regularly deal with the Minister’s Office are the Director General (vacant), Blaine Harvey, the Director, and four Communications Officers (Rebecca Thompson, Patrick Grant, Jennifer Jager, and Fran�oise Le Prohon). Other Communications employees provide administrative support or are involved in publishing, distribution, public enquiries and media monitoring.

    Services Available to Minister’s Office:

     

    Corporate Services Directorate:

    Role and Function: The Corporate Services Directorate provides advisory, planning, reporting and compliance support and services to the Solicitor General, Deputy Solicitor General, the Department and the three small review agencies in the areas of finance, resource planning, administration, security, informatics and telecommunications, human resource management, library services and management review.

    The objectives of the Directorate are:

    Organization: The Corporate Services Directorate has 48 FTE employees. It is comprised of six divisions: Finance, Administration, Human Resources, Systems, Management Review and the Ministry Library.

    The Finance Division is responsible for:

    The Administration Division is responsible for:

    The Human Resources Division is responsible for:

    The Systems Division is responsible for:

    The Management Review Division is responsible for:

    The Ministry Library is responsible for:

     

    Executive Services:

    Role and Function: The Department’s Executive Services Division plays the lead role in managing and coordinating the work of the Department and the Agencies in the areas of Parliamentary Business, Cabinet Liaison, Ministerial Correspondence, Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP), Ministerial Support, as well as regular Ministerial Briefings. It is also a focal point for the Department’s support to the Minister and the Minister’s Office.

    Organization: The Executive Services Division has 25 employees. It comprises a Ministerial Briefing Unit, a Ministerial Correspondence Unit, an Access to Information and Privacy Unit, and a Ministerial Support Unit. The Director of Executive Services reports directly to the Deputy Solicitor General.

    The Ministerial Briefing Unit is responsible for:

    The Ministerial Correspondence Unit is responsible for:

    The Access to Information and Privacy Unit is responsible for:

     

    Legal Services:

    Role and Function: The Department’s Legal Services unit has the mandate to provide timely, accurate and helpful legal advice to the Minister, the Deputy Solicitor General, the Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor General, the Assistant Deputy Solicitor General, and all Directorates of the Department relating to:

    Given that the Solicitor General is the Minister responsible for the agencies, a further role of the Legal Services unit is to ensure that legal advice provided to the agencies by their Legal Services units is consistent.

    Organization: The Legal Services unit consists of a Senior Counsel and three lawyers, all of whom are from the Department of Justice, and two support staff. The Senior Counsel and the three lawyers all provide advice to all parts of the department.

    The unit provides written and oral legal advice and opinions on major initiatives undertaken by the department, such as: DNA legislation; amendments to the Criminal Records Act dealing with the disclosure of pardon records of sex offenders; and, the Mandatory Suspicious Transactions Reporting bill. In addition, given the fact that the vast majority of the issues addressed by the department in the policing, corrections and security fields have a legal component, the lawyers are also called upon to provide day to day advice on a wide range of issues. Furthermore, given the legal component of the department’s work, the lawyers in the Legal Services are, to the extent possible, pro-active and assist the department in developing policy initiatives and proposals that take into account legal considerations. Through this team approach, the need to address legal problems late in a process is minimized.

    When a request for legal advice is made to the Legal Services unit, the lawyers on site have the ability of calling upon the expertise of their colleagues throughout the Department of Justice to be able to provide the best possible legal advice to the Minister and the department.

       

    1. FINANCIAL OVERVIEW AND BASIC RESOURCING

    The Department provides advice and support to the Solicitor General with respect to his responsibility for the provision of direction to the Agencies; enhancement of policy cohesion and coordination within the Portfolio; his accountability to Parliament for the Agencies; for his national leadership role in the federal activities in policing, national security, corrections and conditional release; and in his role as the Minister responsible for Aboriginal policing.

    The following chart provides a breakdown of the financial information:

    Department of the Solicitor General
    Reference Levels (Budget and Planned)

    1998-99 to 2002-03
    ($000’s)

    INPUT FACTOR

    1998-99
    BUDGET

    1999-00
    BUDGET

    2000-01 PLANNED

    2001-02
    PLANNED

    2002-03
    PLANNED

    FTE

    210.0

    217.0

    219.0

    218.0

    218.0

    SALARY *

    11,500.5

    12,139.9

    12,865.9

    12,798.9

    12,798.9

    0&M

    6,092.0

    6,750.0

    7,922.0

    7,842.0

    7,842.0

    GRANTS

    1,796.1

    1,796.1

    1,796.1

    1,796.1

    1,796.1

    CONTRIBUTIONS

             

    Special activity

    1,162.1

    1,162.1

    1,162.1

    1,162.1

    1,162.1

    FNPP **

    49,940.0

    57,040.0

    57,600.0

    58,300.0

    58,520.0

    Subtotal

    51,102.1

    58,202.1

    58,762.1

    59,462.1

    59,682.1

    TOTAL

    70,490.7

    78,888.1

    81,346.1

    81,899.1

    82,119.1

    *Contributions to Employee Benefit Plan are not included.

     

    J. BIOGRAPHIES – SENIOR DEPARTMENTAL OFFICIALS

     

    Nicole Jauvin

    On June 19, 2000, Ms. Nicole Jauvin was appointed Deputy Solicitor General.

    Me Nicole Jauvin a �t� nomm�e sous-solliciteur g�n�ral le 19 juin 2000.

    Prior to her appointment, Ms. Jauvin was Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council and Counsel, Privy Council Office since June 1997. In that position she provided support to the Prime Minister of Canada, the Deputy Prime Minister, the Senate and House Leaders and the Clerk of the Privy Council. Her duties were to provide legal counsel and support on a range of issues related to the Prime Minister’s prerogatives, the organization of government and ministerial mandates and responsibilities, as well as management of the government’s priorities in the House of Commons and Senate. Ms. Jauvin was vice-chair of the Public Management Committee of the OECD from 1997 to 2000.

    Avant sa nomination, Mme Jauvin �tait sous-greffier du Conseil priv� et conseiller juridique, au bureau du Conseil priv�, depuis juin 1997. Dans le cadre de ses fonctions, elle a appuy� le premier ministre du Canada, le vice premier ministre, les leaders du gouvernement en Chambre et au S�nat et le greffier du Conseil priv�. Elle a donn� des conseils de nature juridique sur toutes les questions touchant les pr�rogatives du premier ministre, l’organisation du gouvernement, les mandats des ministres ainsi que celles ayant trait � la gestion des priorit�s du gouvernement � la Chambre des communes et au S�nat. Mme Jauvin a �t� vice-pr�sidente du comit� sur la gestion publique de l’OCDE de 1997 � 2000.

    Ms. Jauvin began her federal government career in 1980 as a Special Assistant (Legislation) in the Department of the Solicitor General Canada. Through her career, she has worked in numerous positions in the Privy Council Office including: Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Machinery of Government; Assistant Secretary to the Cabinet, Security and Intelligence; and Director, Policy and Planning Systems, Senior Personnel Secretariat.

    Mme Jauvin est entr�e au service de l’administration f�d�rale en 1980 � titre d’ajointe sp�ciale (L�gislation) au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral Canada. Au cours de sa carri�re, Mme Jauvin a occup� plusieurs postes au bureau du Conseil priv�, incluant : secr�taire adjointe du Cabinet, Appareil gouvernemental; secr�taire adjointe du Cabinet, S�curit� et renseignement; et directrice, Politiques et syst�mes de planification, Secr�tariat du personnel sup�rieur.

    A graduate of the University of Ottawa, she holds a Licence in Civil Law and is a member of the Qu�bec Bar since 1983. She also holds a B.A. in Communications, a Diploma in International Cooperation, and a Diploma of graduate studies in Law.

    Dipl�m�e de l’Universit� d’Ottawa, elle d�tient une licence en droit civil et elle est membre du Barreau du Qu�bec depuis 1983. Elle d�tient aussi un Baccalaur�at en communications sociales, un dipl�me en coop�ration internationale, et un dipl�me d’�tudes sp�cialis�es en droit.

    Ms. Jauvin is married and is the mother of three children.

    Mme Jauvin est mari�e, et m�re de trois enfants.

     

    Paul E. Kennedy

    Mr. Kennedy is currently the Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor General, Solicitor General Canada, Policing and Security Branch. He is responsible for providing expert advice and support to the Solicitor General of Canada in the discharge of his responsibility for the provision of direction to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS). He supports the Solicitor General’s national leadership role in national security, law enforcement and policing; providing strategic policy advice on issues of national security, counter-terrorism, anti-organized crime, and policing. 

    M. Paul Kennedy occupe actuellement au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral du Canada le poste de sous-solliciteur g�n�ral adjoint principal, Secteur de la police et de la s�curit�. Il est charg� de fournir des conseils �clair�s et du soutien au solliciteur g�n�ral dans l’exercice de sa fonction d’orientation � l’�gard de la Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC) et du Service canadien du renseignement de s�curit� (SCRS). Il appuie le solliciteur g�n�ral dans son r�le de chef de file national en mati�re de s�curit� nationale, d’application de la loi et de services de police, en lui donnant des conseils strat�giques sur les politiques li�es � la s�curit� nationale, � la lutte contre le terrorisme et le crime organis� et aux services de police.

    Prior to his appointment with the Department of the Solicitor General, Mr. Kennedy was Senior General Counsel and Director of the Strategic Prosecution and Policy Section with the Criminal Law Branch of the Canadian Department of Justice. Mr. Kennedy provided expert advice and direction on all drug, proceeds of crime and money laundering investigations and prosecutions instituted on behalf of the Attorney General of Canada.

    Avant sa nomination au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral du Canada, M. Kennedy �tait avocat g�n�ral principal et directeur de la Section de l'�laboration des politiques strat�giques en mati�re de poursuites � la Direction du droit p�nal du minist�re de la Justice du Canada. � ce titre, il a fourni des conseils avis�s et de l’orientation pour toutes les enqu�tes et les poursuites entreprises au nom du procureur g�n�ral du Canada en mati�re de drogues, de produits de la criminalit� et de blanchiment d'argent.

    Throughout his twenty five year career, Mr. Kennedy has acted as legal counsel for various Departments within the Government of Canada including, Acting Senior General Counsel with the Solicitor General Canada, where he co-ordinated the provision of legal advice to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, Corrections Canada and the National Parole Board. As General Counsel and Director of Legal Services for the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), Mr. Kennedy provided legal advice on issues such as the merits of proposed investigations of individuals or groups alleged to pose a threat to national security. He also acted as Senior Counsel for the Departmental of National Defence, Communications Security Establishment, providing legal advice in support of Canada’s Foreign Intelligence requirements. 

    Au cours des vingt-cinq ans de sa carri�re, M. Kennedy a exerc� les fonctions de conseiller juridique dans diff�rents minist�res, par exemple comme avocat g�n�ral principal par int�rim au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral du Canada, o� il devait coordonner la prestation d’avis juridiques � la Gendarmerie royale du Canada, au Service canadien du renseignement de s�curit�, au Service correctionnel du Canada et � la Commission nationale des lib�rations conditionnelles. � titre d’avocat g�n�ral et directeur des Services juridiques du SCRS, Me Kennedy a donn� des avis juridiques sur des questions telles que l’opportunit� d’enqu�ter sur des personnes ou des groupes soup�onn�s de menacer la s�curit� nationale. En outre, il a �t� avocat principal du Centre de la s�curit� des t�l�communications du minist�re de la D�fense nationale, o� il fournissait des conseils juridiques visant � r�pondre aux besoins du Canada en mati�re de renseignements ext�rieurs.

    Mr. Kennedy has worked as a Federal Prosecutor, and was Counsel in numerous trials from 1974 to 1981, involving drug violations, tax evasions, extradition and the successful prosecution of complex inter-provincial and international criminal conspiracies involving members of organized crime. He has appeared as counsel in over 100 jury trials and appeared before the Ontario Court of Appeals to argue sentence and conviction appeals. 

    M. Kennedy a rempli les fonctions de procureur f�d�ral, notamment lors de nombreux proc�s, entre 1974 et 1981, portant sur des infractions en mati�re de drogues, de fraude fiscale et d’extradition. Il a aussi contribu� � la condamnation d’individus impliqu�s dans des affaires complexes de crime organis� aux niveaux interprovincial et international. Comme avocat, il a particip� � plus de cent proc�s devant jury et comparu devant la Cour d’appel de l’Ontario dans des cas d’appel contre des condamnations.

    Mr. Kennedy received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History, Political science and English from the University of Montreal in 1969 and a Bachelor of Common Law from the University of Western Ontario in 1972. He is a member of the Law Society of Upper Canada, as well as the International Association of Prosecutors. June 1998, Mr. Kennedy was a speaker at the 19th Annual Federal Prosecutors Conference on "Fighting Organized Crime" and, A delegate at the September, 1997 Conference of the International Association of  Prosecutors on "International Co-operation in the Global Village"

    M. Kennedy a obtenu son baccalaur�at �s arts en histoire, sciences politiques et anglais � l’Universit� de Montr�al en 1969, puis son baccalaur�at en common law � l’Universit� Western Ontario en 1972. Il est membre du Barreau du Haut-Canada et de l’Association internationale des procureurs. En juin 1998, il a pr�sent� un expos� sur la lutte contre le crime organis� au 19e S�minaire annuel des procureurs de la Couronne f�d�rale. En septembre 1997, il a assist� comme d�l�gu� � la conf�rence de l’Association internationale des procureurs qui avait pour th�me la coop�ration internationale dans le village mondial.

    In his capacity as Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor General, Mr. Kennedy co-chairs the highly successful Canada-United States Cross-Border Crime Forum and the National Coordinating Committee on Organized Crime. He was recently selected as a member of the Canadian Delegation to the "International Conference on Fighting Corruption", held in Washington in February 1999.

    � titre de sous-solliciteur g�n�ral adjoint principal, M. Kennedy est copr�sident du Forum sur la criminalit� transfrontali�re Canada-Etats-Unis, qui conna�t beaucoup de succ�s, et du Comit� national de coordination sur le crime organis�. R�cemment, il a �t� choisi comme membre de la d�l�gation canadienne � la conf�rence internationale sur la lutte contre la corruption, tenue � Washington en f�vrier 1999.

     

    Kristine Burr

    Kristine Burr joined the Department of the Solicitor General as Assistant Deputy Solicitor General, Corrections and Aboriginal Policing on March 1, 2000.

    Kristine Burr s’est joint au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral le 1er mars 2000 en tant que sous-solliciteure g�n�rale adjointe, Affaires correctionnelles et police des Autochtones.

    Previously, Ms. Burr was Director General, Surface Transportation Policy at Transport Canada where she was responsible for economic policies pertaining to rail, motor carriers, intelligent transportation systems and highways. As Head of Delegation for Canada for the NAFTA Land Transportation Standards Subcommittee, she also led Canada’s efforts to ensure harmonized standards and regulatory practices governing rail and motor vehicle activities in the three NAFTA countries.

    Auparavant, Mme Burr occupait le poste de directrice g�n�rale de la Politique de surface � Transport Canada. � ce titre, elle �tait responsable des politiques �conomiques relatives au transport ferroviaire et routier et du syst�me de transport intelligent. En tant que chef de la d�l�gation du Canada devant le Sous-comit� des normes relatives aux transports terrestres de l’AL�NA, elle a dirig� les efforts du Canada en vue d’harmoniser les normes et les pratiques r�glementaires r�gissant les activit�s de transport ferroviaire et routier dans les trois pays partis � l’AL�NA.

    Prior to joining Transport Canada, Mrs. Burr held several positions within the Privy Council Office, most recently as Director of Operations in the Economic and Regional Development Policy Secretariat from 1993 to 1995. She has also worked in a number of other federal departments over the years, including the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, the Department of the Environment and the Department of Agriculture.

    Avant de travailler � Transport Canada, Mme Burr a occup� divers postes au sein du Bureau du Conseil priv�. De 1993 � 1995, elle a travaill� comme directrice des op�rations, Politique du d�veloppement �conomique et r�gional. Elle a aussi travaill� au fil des ans pour d’autres minist�res f�d�raux, notamment le Secr�tariat du Conseil du Tr�sor, le minist�re de l’�nergie, des Mines et des Ressources, le minist�re de l’Environnement et le minist�re de l’Agriculture.

    Mrs. Burr is a graduate of Carleton University and the University of Western Ontario.

    Mme Burr est une dipl�m�e de la Carleton University et de l’University of Western Ontario.

     

    Yvette Alo�si

    Ms. Alo�si joined the federal public service in 1983 as a translator/editor at the Public Service Commission (PSC). Over the next seven years, she held several positions at the PSC until she became a CAP participant in 1989.

    Mme Alo�si est entr�e � la fonction publique f�d�rale en 1983 comme traducteur � la Commission de la fonction publique (CFP). Pendant sept ans, elle a occup� de nombreux postes � la CFP jusqu’en 1989 o� elle est entr�e au programme CAP.

    In 1990, Ms. Alo�si joined the Machinery of Government Secretariat of the Privy Council Office, where she dealt with broad public service (Public Service 2000), constitutional, social and international issues.

    C’est en 1990 que Mme Alo�si entre au Secr�tariat de l’Appareil gouvernemental du Bureau du Conseil priv� o� elle traite des questions touchant la fonction publique dans son ensemble, dans les domaines constitutionnel, social et international.

    Ms. Alo�si left the Privy Council Office in October 1995 to become Director, Law and Enforcement Group.

    Mme Alo�si a quitt� le Bureau du Conseil priv� en Octobre 1995 pour se joindre au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral comme directeur, Application de la Loi.

    Ms. Alo�si was appointed Director General of Policing and Law Enforcement, Department of the Solicitor General, in March 1996.

    Mme. Alo�si a pris ses fonctions de directrice g�n�rale de la Police et de l’Application de la loi au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral en mars 1996.

    Born in N�mes, France, Ms. Alo�si has a Masters degree (without thesis) in English (Education), from the University of Montpellier (France). She has one daughter.

    N�e � N�mes, France, Mme Alo�si a une ma�trise (sans th�se) en anglais (�ducation) de l’universit� de Montpellier (France). Mme Alo�si a une fille.

     

    Maurice Archdeacon

    On 1 September 1999 Mr. Maurice D. Archdeacon was appointed Inspector General of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

    Le 1er septembre 1999, M. Maurice Archdeacon a �t� nomm� inspecteur g�n�ral du Service canadien du renseignement de s�curit�.

    Born in Liverpool, England in 1934, Mr. Archdeacon was educated at St. Edward’s College and the University of London. He attended the Aerospace Systems Course in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1962, Staff College in Toronto in 1968, and Post Graduate Management at Monterey, California in 1974.

    N� � Liverpool (Angleterre) en 1934, M. Archdeacon a fait ses �tudes au St. Edward's College et � la University of London. En 1962, il a suivi le Cours sur les syst�mes a�rospatiaux offert � Winnipeg (Manitoba). Il a �tudi� au Coll�ge d'�tat-major � Toronto en 1968 et, en 1974, a fait des �tudes sup�rieures en gestion � Monterey (Californie).

    After several years as a pilot, flying instructor, and staff officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force, Mr. Archdeacon was appointed as Executive Assistant to the Chief of the Defence Staff in 1975. In 1980, at the rank of Brigadier General, he was appointed Chef de Cabinet to the Chairman of the Military Committee at NATO Headquarters in Bruxelles.

    Apr�s avoir pass� plusieurs ann�es dans l'Aviation royale du Canada, � titre de pilote, d'instructeur de vol et d'officier d'�tat-major, M. Archdeacon a �t� nomm� chef de cabinet du chef d'�tat-major de la D�fense en 1975. En 1980, avec le grade de brigadier-g�n�ral, il est devenu chef de cabinet du pr�sident du Comit� militaire au si�ge de l'OTAN � Bruxelles.

    In 1983 Mr. Archdeacon was appointed Deputy Assistant Secretary, Defence and Foreign Policy in the Privy Council Office. In 1984 he was a member of Prime Minister Trudeau’s Task Force for the Peace Initiative.

    En 1983, M. Archdeacon a �t� nomm� sous-secr�taire adjoint de la Politique �trang�re et de la D�fense au Bureau du Conseil priv�. En 1984, il est devenu membre du groupe de travail du premier ministre Trudeau pour l'initiative de paix.

    In 1985, Mr. Archdeacon was appointed Executive Director of the Security Intelligence Review Committee. He served in this capacity until August 1999.

    En 1985, M. Archdeacon a �t� nomm� directeur ex�cutif du Comit� de surveillance des activit�s du renseignement de s�curit�, poste qu'il a occup� jusqu'en ao�t 1999.

    In 1992 Mr. Archdeacon co-chaired the Canada 21 Council, which presented its findings to the Prime Minister in 1994. Mr. Archdeacon was also chair of the Canadian Council for International Peace

    En 1992, M. Archdeacon est devenu copr�sident du Conseil Canada 21, qui a pr�sent� ses constatations au premier ministre en 1994. M. Archdeacon a �galement rempli la fonction de pr�sident du Conseil canadien pour la paix et la s�curit� internationales.

     

     

    Michel D’Avignon

    Michel D'Avignon assumed his duties as Director General of the National Security Directorate as of June 28, 1999.

    Michel D'Avignon a d�but� ses responsabilit�s de Directeur g�n�ral de la Direction g�n�rale de la s�curit� nationale, � compter du 28 juin 1999.

    Michel has 28 years experience in the federal government. He spent the last nine years with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. Most recently he was the Director General of Training and Development at CSIS.

    Michel a 28 ann�es d’exp�rience dans le gouvernement f�d�ral. Il a pass� les neuf derni�res ann�es au Service canadien du renseignement de s�curit�. Plus r�cemment, Michel occupait le poste de Directeur g�n�ral, formation et d�veloppement, au sein du SCRS.

    He has extensive experience with central agencies and departments, namely Indian and Northern Affairs, Privy Council Office and the Public Service Commission.

    Michel a acquis de l'exp�rience dans divers agences et minist�res, dont les Affaires indiennes et du nord, le Bureau du conseil priv� et la Commission de la fonction publique.

     

    Peter D. Fisher

    Mr. Fisher occupies the position of Director General, the Aboriginal Policing Directorate. His government career spans over 30 years and 6 departments.

    M. Fisher occupe actuellement le poste de directeur g�n�ral de la Police des Autochtones. Sa carri�re au gouvernement s’�chelonne sur 30 ans et couvre 6 minist�res.

    He has worked: in federal corrections as an institutional counsellor, as a parole supervisor, and as a regional manager; with Indian Affairs he served as a land claims negotiator in both B. C. and the Yukon; in Environment Canada he was responsible for managing corporate policy issues; in Energy, Mines and Resources, he served as Director General, Corporate Policy Branch; in Industry Canada he served as senior advisor to the National Advisory Board on Science and Technology (NABST); and most recently (1995-98) he has served as the Director General of the Policy, Planning, Information and Services Branch in the new Earth Sciences Sector (ESS), NRCan.

    Il a d’abord travaill�: aux services correctionnels f�d�raux en tant que conseiller, surveillant de la lib�ration conditionnelle et gestionnaire r�gional; aux Affaires indiennes, il a assum� les fonctions de n�gociateur des revendications territoriales en C.-B. et au Yukon; � Environnement Canada, il a �t� responsable de la gestion des questions touchant les politiques du Minist�re; � �nergie, Mines et Ressources, il a occup� le poste de directeur g�n�ral des Politiques minist�rielles; � Industrie Canada, il a �t� conseiller principal aupr�s du Conseil consultatif national des sciences et de la technologie (CCNST) et, plus r�cemment (de 1995 � 1998), il a occup� le poste de directeur g�n�ral de la Politique, de la planification, de l’information et des sciences au Secteur des sciences de la Terre (SST), nouvellement cr�� � RNC.

    Raised on a farm in eastern Ontario, Mr. Fisher subsequently obtained a B.A. and his Master's degree in Social Work. He has undertaken Senior Officer’s Training in Corrections, and the Career Assignment Program. He has recently led high profile inter-departmental projects relating to Science &Technology Capacity and Sustainable Communities.

    M. Fisher a �t� �lev� sur une ferme � l’est de l’Ontario. Il a ensuite obtenu un baccalaur�at et une ma�trise en travail social. Il a suivi la formation des cadres sup�rieurs en administration des services correctionnels et particip� au programme Cours et affectations de perfectionnement. Il a r�cemment men� des projets interminist�riels importants li�s aux sciences et � la technologie et au d�veloppement durable des centres urbains.

    Mr. Fisher is married, has four children and a grandson.

    M. Fisher est mari�, a quatre enfants et un petit-fils.

     

    Blaine H. Harvey

    Blaine Harvey has been with the Department of the Solicitor General since 1976.

    Blaine Harvey est au service du Minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral depuis 1976.

    He has over 22 years experience in government communications, most of that time spent directly supporting Ministers’ offices and Minister’s press secretaries. On several occasions, he has acted as the Solicitor General’s press secretary, most recently for a year as the Honorable Herb Gray’s press secretary when he held the post of Solicitor General.

    Il poss�de plus de 22 ans d’exp�rience dans le domaine des communications gouvernementales, dont la majeure partie a �t� acquise en travaillant directement aupr�s des ministres et des attach�s de presse des ministres. Il a agi � plusieurs moments comme attach� de presse du solliciteur g�n�ral, la derni�re fois pendant une ann�e en qualit� d’attach� de presse de l’honorable Herb Gray, quand celui-ci occupait le poste de solliciteur g�n�ral.

    As Director, his role is to ensure the provision of commmunications planning, support and advice to the Minister and senior Departmental officials.

    En tant que directeur, son r�le consiste � voir � la planification des communications et � fournir soutien et conseils en cette mati�re au ministre et aux cadres sup�rieurs du Minist�re.

    He holds a B.A (Honours) from Brock University.

    Il d�tient un baccalaur�at (avec sp�cialisation) de l’Universit� de Brock.

    He is married and has four children.

    Mari�, il est p�re de quatre enfants.

     

    Eva Plunkett

    Eva Plunkett was appointed Director General of Corporate Services, Department of the Solicitor General, in August, 1996.

    Mme Eva Plunkett a �t� nomm�e directrice g�n�rale des Services minist�riels, minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral, en ao�t 1996.

    Born in the Outaouais Region of Quebec, Ms. Plunkett holds a B.A. in Political Science (with distinction) from Carleton University and has undertaken graduate studies in political science at Carleton.

    Mme Plunkett est n�e dans la r�gion de l’Outaouais (Qu�bec). Elle d�tient un baccalaur�at en sciences politiques de l’universit� Carleton (pour lequel elle a obtenu la mention � avec distinction �), et elle a entrepris des �tudes sup�rieures en sciences politiques � cette m�me universit�.

    Ms. Plunkett joined the public service in 1975 in the Finance Division, Department of the Solicitor General. She then held a succession of positions within the Department. In 1984, she was appointed Director of Administration and, in 1988, Director of Financial and Administrative Services. In 1993, she was appointed Director, Finance and Administration, Department of the Solicitor General.

    Mme Plunkett a joint les rangs de la fonction publique en 1975 lorsqu’elle est entr�e � la Division des finances du minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral. Elle a ensuite occup� divers postes successifs � l’int�rieur du Minist�re. En 1984, elle a �t� nomm�e directrice de l’Administration et, en 1988, directrice des Services financiers et administratifs. En 1993, elle est devenue directrice des Finances et de l’administration, minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral.

    Ms. Plunkett is a founding member of the Federal Association of Security Officials (FASO) and has served as President since 1994. She was the National President of the Financial Management Institute (FMI) in 1995-96, and currently serves as a member of the Credit Committee at the Civil Service Co-op.

    Mme Plunkett est membre fondatrice de l’Association f�d�rale des responsables de la s�curit�, organisme qu’elle pr�side depuis 1994. Elle a �galement �t� pr�sidente nationale de l’Institut de la gestion financi�re du Canada en 1995-1996. Elle est pr�sentement membre du comit� au cr�dit � la co-op�rative de cr�dit au Service civil.

    Ms. Plunkett is married to Peter Hogan.

    Mme Plunkett est mari�e � M. Peter Hogan.

     

    Greg Wright

    In 1999 Mr. Wright became responsible for the Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice (SPIJ) Directorate which was created as a result of merging the Integrated Justice Information Directorate and the Policy Planning and Coordination Directorate.

    En 1999 M. Wright � pris la responsabilit� de la Direction g�n�rale des politiques strat�giques et de la justice int�gr�e. Ce secteur � �t� cr�e suite � l’amalgamation de la direction g�n�rale de l’information de la justice int�gr�e et de la Direction g�n�rale de la planification et de la coordination des politiques.

    In 1999 Mr. Wright became responsible for the Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice (SPIJ) Directorate which was created as a result of merging the Integrated Justice Information Directorate and the Policy Planning and Coordination Directorate.

    En 1999 M. Wright � pris la responsabilit� de la Direction g�n�rale des politiques strat�giques et de la justice int�gr�e. Ce secteur � �t� cr�e suite � l’amalgamation de la direction g�n�rale de l’information de la justice int�gr�e et de la Direction g�n�rale de la planification et de la coordination des politiques.

    Mr. Wright joined the Solicitor General Department in March 1998 to lead the nascent Integrated Justice Information initiative.

    M. Wright s’est joint au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral en mars 1998 pour diriger la nouvelle initiative Information de la justice int�gr�e.

    Over the past two decades, he has had a diversified career in a variety of domains, including policy, planning, human resources, administration, finance, and informatics in several federal government departments, such as Transport Canada, Revenue Canada, and Public Works and Government Services.

    Au cours des 20 derni�res ann�es, sa carri�re l’a amen� � travailler dans divers domaines -- les politiques, la planification, les ressources humaines, l’administration, les finances et l’informatique – au sein de plusieurs minist�res, notamment Transports Canada, Revenu Canada et Travaux publics et Services gouvernementaux Canada.

    Most recently, he served as the Director General of Informatics for the Public Service Commission of Canada, responsible for its migration to client/server and internet technologies.

    En dernier lieu, il occupait le poste de directeur g�n�ral de l’Informatique � la Commission de la fonction publique du Canada o� il �tait charg� de la technologie du transfert des donn�es client-serveur et de la technologie internet.

    Mr. Wright holds an Honours B.A. in Economics from the University of Western Ontario and has undertaken graduate studies in Public Administration from Carleton University.

    M. Wright poss�de un baccalaur�at sp�cialis� en �conomie de l’Universit� Western Ontario et il a entrepris des �tudes sup�rieures en administration publique � l’Universit� Carleton.

    He is currently Past President of the Old Ottawa South Community Association, having served as President from 1995-1997. He is a founding member of the Inner City Coalition of Community Associations and the City Centre Coalition, which were formed to give communities a voice in local issues. He was honoured to receive a "Whitton Award" from the City of Ottawa in 1997 for Effective Community Activism.

    Il est pr�sident sortant de la Old Ottawa South Community Association o� il a œuvr� de 1995 � 1997. Il est membre fondateur de la Inner City Coalition of Community Associations et de la City Centre Coalition, qui ont �t� form�es pour permettre aux collectivit�s de se faire entendre sur des questions locales. En 1997, il a re�u de la Ville d’Ottawa le � Whitton Award � pour son activit� efficace au niveau local.

     

    Richard Zubrycki

    Mr. Zubrycki was appointed to the position of Director General, Corrections in 1994, having previously held the post of Director General, Corrections Policy and Program Analysis since 1988.

    M.Zubrycki a �t� nomm� au poste de directeur g�m�ral des Affaires correctionnelles en 1994; pr�c�demment, il occupait depuis 1988 le poste de directeur g�n�al de l’Analyse des politiques et des programmes correctionnels.

    He began his public service career as a probation officer with the Manitoba Probation Service in 1965 and was appointed Senior Probation Officer in 1970.

    Il a commenc� sa carri�re de fonctionnaire comme agent de probation au Service de probation du Manitoba en 1965 et a ensuite �t� nomm� agent principal de probation en 1970.

    Mr. Zubrycki joined the federal public service in 1973 when he was appointed Coordinator of Social Development for the Ontario Region of the Canadian Penitentiary Service (now the Correctional Service of Canada). He was appointed Assistant Director Socialization at Stony Mountain Penitentiary in Manitoba where he served until 1976.

    M.Zubrycki est entr� � la fonction publique f�d�rale en 1973 � titre de coordonnateur de D�veloppement social, r�gion de l’Ontario, au Service canadien des p�nitenciers (maintenant le Service correctionnel du Canada). Il a ensuit� �t� nomm� directeur adjoint de la Socialisation � l’�tablissement de Stony Mountain au Manitoba, o� il a travaill� jusqu’en 1976.

    Following post-graduate study Mr. Zubrycki joined the Policy and Planning Branch of the Correctional Service at its headquarters in Ottawa in 1978. He was appointed to the position of Senior Policy Analyst in the Correctons Policy Directorate of the Ministry Secretariat in 1981. He has subsequently held various posts of increasing responsibility in the corrections policy field until being appointed to his current position.

    En 1981, il a �t� nomm� analyste principal des politiques � la Direction g�n�rale des politiques correctionnelles au Secr�tariat du Minist�re. Il a ensuite occup� divers postes comportant un nombre croissant de responsabilit�s dans le domaine des politiques correctionnelles avant son poste actuel de directeur g�n�ral.

    Mr. Zubrycki was born in Winnipeg and is married with three children. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Winnipeg and Master’s degree in Social Work from the University of Manitoba. He has also completed the course requirements for the Ph.D. in Social Work at the University of Toronto concentrating on the history of Canadian correctional policy.

    M. Zubrycki est n� � Winnipeg, il est mari� et a trois enfants. Il a obtenu son baccalaur�at �s arts � l’Universit� de Winnipeg et sa ma�trise en travail social � l’Universit� du Manitoba. Il a �galement suivi les cours requis pour un doctorat en travail social � l’Universit� de Toronto, portant plus particuli�rement sur l’histoire de la politique correctionnelle canadienne.

     

    Paul Dubrule

    Mr. Dubrule joined the federal public service in 1984 as Executive Assistant to the Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Legal Services, of the Department of Justice. Over the next four years he worked as counsel at Justice Headquarters in the Information Law and Privacy section and the Administrative Law section.

    M. Dubrule est entr� dans la fonction publique f�d�rale en 1984 en qualit� d'adjoint ex�cutif du premier sous-ministre adjoint, Services juridiques, au minist�re de la Justice. Au cours des quatre ann�es qui ont suivi, il a travaill� comme conseiller juridique � l'administration centrale du minist�re de la Justice, � la section du Droit � l'information et � la protection des renseignements personnels, ainsi qu'� la section du Droit administratif.

    From 1988 until 1991, Mr. Dubrule was counsel in the Justice Legal Services’ unit at the Department of Foreign Affairs.

    De 1988 � 1991, M. Dubrule a �t� conseiller juridique dans l'unit� des Services juridiques d�tach�e par le minist�re de la Justice au minist�re des Affaires ext�rieures.

    In December 1991, Mr. Dubrule joined the Legal Services’ unit at the Department of the Solicitor General. In November 1993 he was appointed acting Director of the unit. In July 1994, he became the Director General of the National Security Directorate, Department of the Solicitor General.

    En d�cembre 1991, M. Dubrule a �t� rattach� � l'unit� des Services juridiques du minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral. En novembre 1993, il a �t� nomm� directeur int�rimaire de l'unit�. En juillet 1994, il est devenu directeur g�n�ral de la S�curit� nationale au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral.

    In October 1996, Mr. Dubrule became Senior Counsel and Manager of the Legal Services unit, Department of the Solicitor General.

    En octobre 1996, M. Dubrule est devenu conseiller senior et directeur dans l’unit� des Services juridiques au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral.

    Mr. Dubrule holds a B.A. in English literature from McGill University and a LLB from Osgoode Hall. He was called to the bar of Ontario in 1984.

    M. Dubrule a un B.A. en litt�rature anglaise de l'Universit� McGill et un LL.B. d'Osgoode Hall. Il a �t� re�u au barreau de l'Ontario en 1984.

     

    Janis Gardiner

    Ms. Gardiner was appointed Director of Executive Services Directorate, Department of the Solicitor General in May 1997. She manages the necessary preparations for the Minister’s attendance in the House of Commons, Parliamentary Committees, Cabinet and all departmental meetings. She also supervises the efficient processing of Ministerial correspondence and departmental responses to requests under the Access to Information and Privacy laws.

    Mme Gardiner a �t� nomm�e directrice des services ex�cutifs au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral du Canada en mai 1997. � ce titre, elle est responsable des pr�paratifs entourant la participation du ministre aux d�bats de la Chambre des communes, aux activit�s des comit�s parlementaires, aux r�unions du Cabinet, ainsi qu’� toutes les r�unions minist�rielles. Elle veille �galement � la correspondance du ministre et au traitement des demandes pr�sent�es en vertu de la Loi sur l’acc�s � l’information et de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels.

    Ms. Gardiner has worked for the Government of Canada since 1986 in various Departments including Labour Canada, Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Fitness and Amateur Sport.

    Au service du gouvernement du Canada depuis 1986, Mme Gardiner a travaill� dans diff�rents minist�res et organismes, dont le minist�re du Travail, Affaires indiennes et du Nord, ainsi que Condition physique et Sport amateur.

    In September 1991, she joined the Department of the Solicitor General of Canada as a Policy Analyst with the Policing and Law Enforcement Directorate. In April 1991, she joined the Aboriginal Policing Directorate as a Policy Advisor and later as a Senior Policy Advisor. In September 1996, she transferred to the National Security Directorate in order to broaden her departmental experience beyond law enforcement and Aboriginal justice, to include national security issues.

    En septembre 1991, elle s’est jointe au minist�re du Solliciteur g�n�ral du Canada, en tant qu’analyste de politiques � la Direction g�n�rale de la police et de l’application de la loi. En avril 1991, elle est pass�e � la Direction g�n�rale de la police des Autochtones, o� elle a occup� le poste de conseill�re en mati�re de politiques, puis celui de conseill�re principale. En septembre 1996, elle est entr�e � la Direction g�n�rale de la s�curit� nationale afin de diversifier son exp�rience au Minist�re, centr�e jusqu’alors sur les questions li�es � l’application de la loi et � la justice applicable aux Autochtones, pour l’�tendre � la s�curit� nationale.

    Ms. Gardiner was born in Gainsborough, Saskatchewan. She is married to John Petersen.

    Mme Gardiner est n�e � Gainsborough, en Saskatchewan. Elle est mari�e � M. John Petersen.

     

     

    1. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL ACT

    CHAPTER S-13 - An Act respecting the Department of the Solicitor General

    SHORT TITLE

    1. This Act may be sited as the Department of the Solicitor General Act. R.S., c. S-12, s.1.

    ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT

    1. (1) There is hereby established a department of the Government of Canda called the Department of the Solicitor General over which the Solicitor General of Canada appointed by commission under the Great Seal shall preside.
    2. (2) The Solicitor General holds office during pleasure and has the management and direction of the Department. R.S., c. S-12, s.2.

    3. The Governor in Council may appoint an officer called the Deputy Solicitor General to hold office during pleasure and to be the deputy head of the Department. R.S., c. S-12. s.3.

    POWERS, DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL

    1. The powers, duties and functions of the Solicitor General extend to and include all matters over which Parliament has jurisdiction, not by law assigned to any other department, board or agency of the Government of Canada relating to
    1. reformatories, prisons and penitentiaries;
    2. parole and remissions;
    3. the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; and
    4. the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. R.S. c. S-12, s.4; 1984, c.21. s.95.

    ANNUAL REPORT

    The Solicitor General shall on or before January 31 next following the end of each fiscal year or, if Parliament is not then sitting on any of the first five days next thereafter that either House of Parliament is sitting, submit to Parliament a report showing the operations of the Department for that fiscal year. R.S. c. S-12. S.5.

     

    1. DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEES

    Departmental Executive Committee

    To review weekly the Minister’s priorities, and the calendar of key events involving the Minister’s participation, to ensure requisite departmental coordination and preparation of briefing materials; to exchange information/debriefings amongst senior departmental executives on recent events and current issues.

    Membership: DSG Chair; SADSG; ADSG; IG; all DGs; Minister’s E.A.; Legal Services; Director of Executive Services; E.A. to DSG; E.A. to SADSG; and E.A. to ADSG.

    Departmental Policy Committee

    An information, advisory and consultative forum for the senior policy management team of the Department respecting significant ongoing and proposed policy initiatives, meeting once a month.

    Membership: Chair DSG (alternating with) SADSG, ADSG; IG; all DGs; Legal Services; and Director of Executive Services, and Director of PPC.

    Human Resources Committee

    To provide guidance and direction on the policies, strategies and principles governing the management of human resources in the Department, including: employment equity representation; official languages requirements; advice to the DSG on executive human resources utilization; and the development and review of human resource plans.

    Membership: DSG Chair; SADSG; ADSG; IG; all DGs; Director of Executive Services; Director of Human Resources; E.A. to SADSG; and E.A. to ADSG.

    Management Review Committee

    To assist the Deputy Solicitor General in exercising direction over the Department’s review function, including the examination and approval of the budgets, policies, procedures, plans, reports and management action plans related to the functions of internal audit, program evaluation and review.

    Membership: DSG Chair; SADSG; ADSG; DG of Corporate Services; DG of Communications; DG of Aboriginal Policing; and Director of Management Review.

    Employment Equity Advisory Committee

    Advises the DSG and HRC on employment equity matters, including advice on equity issues and objectives (relating to Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, visible minorities and women). Also provides input to the Departmental Employment Equity Plan.

    Membership: representatives of all four Employment Equity target groups, and the major organizational units within the Department.

    Departmental Planning Committee

    An advisory and consultation committee for the overall planning cycle and the development of the key planning documents of the Department.

    Membership: DSG (Chair), SADSG, ADSG, DG Corporate Services, DG Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice, DG Communications, Senior Resource Planning Officer (Corporate Services)

    Other Committees

     

    1. FUNDING PROGRAMS FOR NATIONAL VOLUNTARY AGENCIES

    BACKGROUND

    National Voluntary Organizations (NVO’s) have played an important part in the development and operation of criminal justice initiatives and services in Canada. The Ministry of the Solicitor General actively supports and encourages cooperation with the voluntary sector, through consultation, information sharing, exchange of expertise and knowledge, provision of resources and development of suitable accountability measures.

    The present sustaining grants program was established in 1983 to consolidate the funding previously provided separately by the Department and several of the agencies (Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) and the National Parole Board (NPB)). This funding was largely directed to agencies who face challenges in obtaining private contributions, for example, in such areas as offender reintegration.

    This funding program is one of the few that remains in government to provide core funding. These funds attempt to provide stable and predictable funding to national voluntary organizations to maintain their national structure and cover general operational expenses (including salaries and benefits, rent, translation, telephone and postage, and equipment/material for staff and board members). In addition, those organizations which require networks of affiliate branches may request specific funding in support of these networks, usually to address increased communication requirements.

    FUNDING

    The level of grant that each organization receives is based on historic antecedents.

    Currently, this grant program provides financial assistance to fourteen NVOs whose objectives and activities are supported by, and are related to, the mandate of this Ministry. (Attached is a list of NVOs with current funding levels). In general, these organizations provide direct services to offenders, support community participation, public education or innovation in criminal justice, or promote crime detection or crime prevention. Three of the fourteen organizations have as their primary function, advocacy/reform and professional association.

    Parliament has allocated approximately $1.8 million to this program for this fiscal year. While funding allocations are provisionally for a three year period (2000-2001, 2001-2002, 2002-2003), the amount must be confirmed by Parliament on a yearly basis.

    As part of the Department’s Long Range Review Plan, the NVO funding program will undergo a review in 2002-2003. The Department is also providing support to a PCO-led initiative, "Engaging the Voluntary Sector" which will enable not only currently funded organizations but also other voluntary organizations, to access new funds to build their capacity to participate in the department’s policy development processes. The Department will be working with members of the voluntary sector over the summer to develop project proposals for use of these new cross-government funds.

    FUNDING APPROVAL

    Following a 1994 evaluation of the funding program, a new accountability and application process was implemented in time for the 1997/98 submission of grant applications. (Note that unlike contributions, grants are an unconditional transfer payment which do not require any formal audit.) However, each organization requesting funding must annually submit: an annual report, an audited financial statement, a proposed budget and strategic plan for upcoming year; and an outline of recent collaboration with the Ministry.

    All applications are reviewed by a Ministry Committee which is chaired by the Department’s Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice Directorate and comprised of representatives from the Department, CSC, NPB and RCMP. Applications are reviewed against Ministry criteria which are consistent with the Treasury Board requirements. During the government-wide program review, the sustaining grants program was reduced by 20% while demands for the services provided by these organizations increased.

    With no increase in available departmental funds, no new grant recipients have been considered in recent years.

    PARTNERSHIP IN MINISTRY POLICY DEVELOPMENT

    The Ministry has a long-standing policy of consultation with the public and stakeholders through many existing fora. Given the increased interest in involving the voluntary sector in policy development, new opportunities for expanding and strengthening these partnerships are possible. Two important examples of existing partnerships include:

    The Department’s Policy Directorates and the Ministry Agencies carry out consultations with NVOs concerning specific policy initiatives.

    A Committee of Ministry officials representing the Department’s Policy Directorates and the Agencies (CSC, NPB, RCMP) meets regularly to enhance portfolio management of NVO issues and the partnership more generally. The Strategic Policy and Integrated Justice Directorate (SPIJ) of the Department chairs this committee.

     

    NATIONAL VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS FUNDING

     

    ORGANIZATIONS (Grant)

    2000-2001

    Association des services de r�habilitation sociale du Qu�bec (ASRS)

    108,707

    Block Parent Program of Canada

    22,950

    Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP)

    37,485

    Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies (CAEFS)

    451,807

    Canadian Training Institute

    109,472

    Canadian Criminal Justice Association (CCJA)

    179,928

    Church Council on Justice and Corrections (CCJC)

    41,234

    John Howard Society of Canada

    509,795

    National Association Active in Criminal Justice (NAACJ)

    51,332

    Prison Arts Foundation

    46,481

    Salvation Army

    67,473

    Seventh Step Society

    44,982

    St. Leonard’s Society of Canada

    90,264

    The Network of Conflict Resolution

    34,234

    Total

    1,796,144

     

    N. KEY STAKEHOLDERS

    ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS

    National Leader: Mr. Phil Fontaine
    A/CEO: Dale Booth

    Suite 1002
    1 Nicholas Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1N 7B7

    Tel.: (613) 241-6789
    Fax:
    (613) 241-5808

    The Assembly of First Nations (AFN) is the national organization of First Nations in Canada. It represents the views of its member First Nations in areas such as Aboriginal and treaty rights, environment, economic development, education, housing, health, social services and land claims.


    ASSOCIATION DES SERVICES DE R�HABILITATION SOCIALE DU QU�BEC

    President: Mr. Yves Proteau
    Director General: Ms. Johanne Vall�e

    2000 St-Joseph Blvd. East
    2nd Floor
    Montreal, Qu�bec
    H2H 1E4

    T�l.: (514) 521-3733
    Fax.:
    (514) 521-3753

    ASRSQ’s mission is to promote and support public involvement in the administration of justice, the prevention of crime, the social reintegration of offenders and the fight against delinquency. Working together with public and private services in the various correctional, judicial, social and community sectors, enables this association to disseminate information in order to inform the public about the problems associated with individuals in trouble with the law.


    BLOCK PARENT PROGRAM OF CANADA INC.

    President: Ms. Rose Marie Danylo Brien
    Office Administrator: Ms. Martha McArthur

    National Office
    12206 – 86 Avenue
    Surrey, B.C.
    V3W 3H7

    Tel.: (604) 594-6788
    Fax:
    (604) 594-6788
    E-Mail
    : blockpar@sfu.ca

    A network of easily recognized safe households, which are approved by the local police, for children and others in the community. The Block Parent Program educates children and others on safety, and, crime prevention issues and programs. Major activities include developing promotions that increase public awareness, citizen participation and awareness of crime prevention measures, and assists the police by providing a forum for interactions between the police and volunteers in the community based policing system.


    CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE (CACP)

    President: Chief Larry Graville, Waterloo Regional Police
    Executive Director: Mr. Bryan McConnell

    130 Albert Street, Suite 1710
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1P 5G4

    Tel.: (613) 233-1106
    Fax:
    (613) 233-6960

    CACP encourages and develops cooperation of all Canadian police organizations in the pursuit of common objectives, to create and develop the highest standards of ethics, integrity, honour and efficiency in law enforcement. Major activities include offering advice to federal and provincial governments with respect to law amendments and criminal justice issues which affect policing and public security. These issues include: organized crime; youth justice; drug abuse; aboriginal issues; and multiculturalism/race relations.


    CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF ELIZABETH FRY SOCIETIES

    President: Ms.Susan Hendricks
    Executive Director: Ms. Kim Pate

    151 Slater Street
    Suite 701
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1P 5H3

    Tel.: (613) 238-2422
    Fax:
    (613) 233-4051
    E-mail
    : kpate@web.net

    CAEFS is a women’s organization dedicated to advocating with and for women who come into conflict with the law in order to ensure their needs, interests and concerns are met in humane and women centred community settings. Promoting collaborative and egalitarian practices, using innovative community-based and women-centred approaches, and, increasing public awareness and understanding of programs and needs for change in the criminal justice system are the main objectives.


    CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF POLICE BOARDS (CAPB)

    President: Mr. Dan MacLeod
    Executive Director: Ms. Wendy Fedec

    111 Lisgar Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K2P 2L7

    Tel.: (613) 560-1312
    Fax:
    (613) 560-1380
    E-mail
    : fedecwe@rmoc.on.ca

    CAPB acts as a national body in support of municipal police services and advocates on issues of national concern. The objectives of the CAPB include promoting quality and uniformity of policing services, formulating policy positions on specific issues, educating the public on policing governance, and collecting and sharing information on matters pertaining to the governance of policing services.


    CANADIAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ASSOCIATION (THE)

    President: Mr. Rob Tropak
    Executive Director: Mr. Gaston St-Jean

    383 Parkdale Avenue, Suite 304
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1Y 4R4

    Tel.: (613) 725-3715
    Fax:
    (613) 725-3720
    E-mail
    : CCJA@istar.ca

    CCJA brings individuals together to promote a higher level of understanding and interaction among practitioners, professionals, volunteers and the public on criminal justice issues. Recognizing the special needs of those affected by crime, including victims, families of victims and offenders, as well as the community as a whole are major objectives of CCJA. Important activities include organizing the Canadian Congress on Criminal Justice which is considered one of the most significant events for professionals in corrections and criminal justice.


    CANADIAN POLICE ASSOCIATION (CPA)

    President: Mr. Grant Obst
    Executive Officer: David Griffin

    141 Catherine Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K2P 1C3

    Tel.: (613) 231-4168
    Fax.:
    (613) 231-3254

    CPA is the national organization representing the rank-and-file police within municipal and provincial police services across Canada. The Association’s main interests rest with issues relating to resources for policing, working conditions, police officer and public safety, and labour-management issues. Over the last decade, the Association has demonstrated an increasing interest in policing and criminal justice matters and has made presentations to the federal government on issues such as money laundering, police pursuits, conditional release and the establishment of a national DNA data bank.


    CANADIAN TRAINING INSTITUTE

    President: Mr. Don Evans
    Executive Director: Mr. John Sawdon

    50 Euston Ave.
    Toronto, Ontario
    M4J 3N3

    Tel.: (416) 778-7056
    Fax:
    (416) 778-8103 or 778-7613
    1-800-336-4908

    CTI strives to improve client-centred services and criminal justice social service agencies by facilitating personal, professional and organizational development nationwide. Qualitative field training, professional consulting services, and organizational development are the main objectives. Identifying and engaging in the undertaking of applied research services as means of understanding and potentially contributing to criminal justice system change are also important objectives.


    CHURCH COUNCIL ON JUSTICE AND CORRECTIONS

    President: Mr. Michael A. Maher
    Program Coordinator/Liaison: Ms. Lorraine Berzins

    507 Bank Street, 2nd Floor
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K2P 1Z5

    Tel.: (613) 563-1688
    Fax:
    (613) 237-6129

    Major objectives include expanding awareness of criminal justice issues, promoting violence reduction and prevention, developing and disseminating education programs on issues related to crime, courts, police, corrections and family violence. Also important is bringing human values to all levels of our criminal justice system, and to demonstrate the positive impact and benefits of these values.


    CONGRESS OF ABORIGINAL PEOPLES

    President: Mr. Dwight Dorey
    Vice President: Mr. Jason Knockwood

    867 St. Laurent Blvd.
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1K 3B1

    Tel.: (613) 747-6022
    Fax:
    (613) 747-8834

    The Congress of Aboriginal peoples (CAP) is the national advocacy organization designed to serve and protect the interests of Aboriginal people living off reserve, M�tis, and Non-treaty Indians. It represents the collective and individual interests of its constituents through member associations in all the provinces and territories.


    FEDERAL/PROVINCIAL CONFERENCE OF HEADS OF CORRECTIONS

    Chairman: Mr. Ole Ingstrup

    340 Laurier Ave. West
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1A 0P9

    Tel.: (613) 995-5781
    Fax.:
    (613) 943-1630

    This forum came into existence following a meeting in November 1978 of the Deputy Ministers responsible for Justice at which concern was expressed over the lack of adequate consultation and ongoing dialogue between federal and provincial/territorial jurisdictions. This concern was largely the result of strong government interest in minimizing duplication and overlaps in services and in promoting coordinated planning. Since 1979, semi-annual meetings have discussed areas of common interest and information has been shared on current issues and problems in corrections.


    FINANCIAL ACTION TASK FORCE (FATF)

    President, Comis�o do Mercado de Valores Mobili�rios: Mr. G. Galvao

    Ministry of Finance
    Ava Fontes Pereira de Melo, no 21
    1050 - Lisboa
    PORTUGAL

    Tel: 351 1 350 3017 or 18
    Fax
    : 351 1 350 3015
    E-mail
    : gilgalvao@cmvm.pt

    FINANCIAL ACTION TASK FORCE (FATF) SECRETARIAT

    Secretary: Mr. Patrick Moulette

    37 bis boulevard Suchet
    75116 Paris, France

    Tel.: 331 45 24 79 45
    Fax:
    331 45 24 17 60

    Comprised of OECD Member countries (plus Singapore and Hong Kong) the FATF was established by the 1989 G-7 Economic Summit in order to address drug money laundering by ensuring that Members have uniform control measures in place. The FATF produced 40 recommendations to improve national legal systems, enhance the role of the financial system and strengthen international cooperation. Annually, the FATF reports through the OECD ministerial meeting and elects a president who takes office in the Fall. The lead role for this portfolio and the responsibility for coordinating the Canadian participation at the three FATF yearly meetings rests with the Department of Finance.


    UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR DRUG CONTROL AND CRIME PREVENTION

    Executive Director: Mr. Pino Arlacchi

    United Nations Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention
    Vienna International Centre
    P.O. Box 500
    A-1400 Vienna, Austria

    Tel: +43 1 26060 0
    Fax:
    +43 1 26060 5866
    E-mail
    : odccp@odccp.org

    The United Nations Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention (ODCCP), which consists of the United Nations International Drug Control Programme and the United Nations Centre for International Crime Prevention, was established to enable the Organization to focus and enhance its capacity to address the interrelated issues of drug control, crime prevention and international terrorism in all its forms. The ODCCP has implemented research and technical assistance programmes in the areas of illicit drugs, money laundering, corruption and organized crime.


    INTER-AMERICAN DRUG ABUSE CONTROL COMMISSION (CICAD)

    Executive Secretary: Mr. David R. Beall

    17th Street and Constitution Ave.
    N.W. Washington, D.C.
    20006

    Tel.: (202) 458-3178
    Fax:
    (202) 458-3668 or (202) 458-3071

    Comprised of 34 Member States, CICAD is the OAS subsidiary body mandated with tackling the drug problem in the hemisphere. Its approach is a balanced one, emphasizing both supply and demand reduction and control measures. The CICAD holds two regular sessions a year, alternating between its headquarters in Washington, D.C. and a Member country. Canada has been a member since 1991. The DSG is supported by the Department both in his role as Canada’s principal delegate and as Chair of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism Working Group.


    INUIT TAPIRISAT OF CANADA

    National Leader: Ms. Okalik Eegeesiak

     

    510-170 Laurier Avenue West
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1P 5V5

    Tel.: (613) 238-8181
    Fax:
    (613) 234-1991

    The Inuit Tapirisat of Canada (ITC) is the national organization representing more than 40,900 Inuit living in 55 communities in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Nunvik, Northern Quebec and Labrador. ITC deals with issues ranging from Inuit self-determination to the preservation of Inuit culture. Pauktuutit, which is the National Women’s organization, is also a full member of Inuit Tapirisat of Canada.


    JOHN HOWARD SOCIETY OF CANADA (THE)

    President: Mr. John Peach
    Acting Executive Director: Mr. Graham Stewart

    771 Montreal Street
    Kingston, Ontario
    K7K 3J6

    Tel.: (613) 542-7547
    Fax:
    (613) 542-6824
    E-mail:
    national@johnhoward.ca

    Current objectives are public education, advocacy for penal reform, assistance to those in conflict with the law, and improvement and progressive development of standards related to correctional services. Major activities are providing services at the local level such as visiting and counselling offenders in prison, assisting their families, preparing release plans and, assisting ex-offenders upon and after release.


    NATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS ACTIVE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

    Chairperson: Ms. Kim Pate
    Executive Co-ordinator: Ms. Lisa Addario

    383 Parkdale Avenue, Suite 308
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1Y 4R4

    Tel.: (613) 761-1032
    Fax:
    (613) 761-9767

    NAACJ works closely with the national voluntary organizations in identifying common interest, facilitating exchange of ideas, planning common action on selected areas, and to increase cooperation and participation of voluntary sector organizations in criminal justice issues. Major activities include an annual meeting between members of the Association, the Deputy Solicitor General and the Deputy Minister of Justice; and participation in UN Congresses on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders.


    NATIONAL JOINT COMMITTEE OF SENIOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OFFICIALS

    Chairman: Mr. Pierre Sangollo
    Executive Secretary: Ms. Janice Russell

    340 Laurier Ave. West
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1A 0P8

    Tel.: (613) 998-6909
    Fax:
    (613) 990-7023

    This forum, which cuts across the jurisdictional lines, promotes mutual understanding, supports activities to improve communication, information-sharing and cooperation among the major components of the criminal justice system, i.e. the police, crown counsel and correctional services.

    The Solicitor General of Canada is invited at the Spring meeting which is held in Ottawa (usually in May) to meet and address the participants.


    NETWORK: INTERACTION FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION (THE)

    Executive Director, Programs: Ms. Kathleen Cleland-Moyer
    Executive Director, Administration: Mr. Paul Young

    Conrad Grebel College
    Waterloo, Ontario
    N2L 3G6

    Tel.: (519) 885-0880
    Fax:
    (519) 885-0806

    The Network facilitates the development of restorative justice and conflict resolution in criminal, civil and community disputes throughout Canada. Important activities include providing information, training, consultation, technical assistance, resource material development, national conferences, workshops, newsletter publication, public education and policy analysis.


    PAUKTUUTIT INUIT WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION

    President: Ms. Veronica Dewar
    Executive Director: Ms. Tracy O’Hearn

    192 Bank Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K2P 1W8

    Tel.: (613) 238-3977
    Fax:
    (613) 238-1787

    Pauktuutit is a national non-profit organization that represents all Inuit women in Canada. Its aim is to foster a greater awareness of the needs of Inuit women and encourage their participation in community, regional and national issues in the areas of social, cultural and economic development.


    PRISON ARTS FOUNDATION

    President: Mr. Gary Howard
    Foundation Manager: Ms. Michelle Hill

    111 Darling Street
    Brantford, Ontario
    N3T 2K8

    Tel.: (519) 752-7405
    Fax:
    (519) 752-7367

    Main objectives are to aid and encourage artistic and cultural development for Canadian federal and provincial inmates and parolees. Current activities include organizing an annual Prison Art Competition, orgainizing exhibitions of inmate and parolee visual arts, publishing inmate and parolee creative writing; and operating a program of leasing/renting inmate, parolee and ex-offender art work.


    ST. LEONARD’S SOCIETY OF CANADA

    President: Ms. Rebecca Howse
    Executive Director: Ms. Elizabeth White

    Suite 712
    151 Slater Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1P 5H3

    Tel.: (613) 233-5170
    Fax:
    (613) 233-5122
    E-mail
    : slsc@istar.ca

    A national affiliation of non-profit community organizations and individuals committed to the prevention of crime through programmes which promote responsible community living and safer communities. Major activities include providing programs and services to adult male and female ex-offenders, young offenders and penitentiary inmates; organizing educational activities designed to educate and involve the public; and developing advice on policies and programs.


    SALVATION ARMY (THE)
    CORRECTIONAL AND JUSTICE SERVICES

    Assistant Social Services Secretary:
    Major Arold Artkenhead

    2 Overlea Boulevard
    Toronto, Ontario
    |M4H 1P4

    Tel.: (416) 425-2111
    Fax:
    (416) 422-6221

    The Salvation Army provides creative, needs-based programs and support services to the accused, the offender, the victim, those who administer the legal and justice systems, and family members. Major activities include monitoring and assisting in the development of correctional and justice reform, providing constructive thought on the legislative process and providing a broad range of programs and services from pre-trial through post-release.


    SEVENTH STEP SOCIETY OF CANADA

    President: Mr. Thomas Gordon
    Executive Director: Mr. Pat Graham

    10620 Waneta Cres. S.E.
    Calgary, Alberta
    T2J 1J6

    Tel.: (403) 271-2278
    Fax:
    (403) 271-8907
    E-mail
    : seventh@cadvision.com

    Main objectives are to assist, develop and foster a spirit of self-reliance by way of cooperation among its members and other ex-convicts, so as to achieve the rehabilitation of ex-convicts, this includes motivating members of the hard core convict population to change their attitudes, values and behaviour. Important activities include providing programs directed toward developing normal social and constructive approaches to living in the community upon release from prison.


    THE FIRST NATIONS CHIEFS OF POLICE ASSOCIATION

    President: Chief Glen Bannon

    Head Office
    c/o Six Nations Police
    P.O. Box 157
    Ohsweken, Ontario
    N0A 1M0

    Tel.: (519) 445-4191
    Fax:
    (519) 445-4894

    The First Nations Chiefs of Police Association was incorporated in 1992. Its objectives include: encouraging the development of First Nations police services; fostering cultural awareness amongst workers of the First Nations police services; promoting the development of meaningful training programs; and encouraging liaison amongst key players.


    THE METIS NATIONAL COUNCIL

    National Leader: Mr. G�rald Morin
    Executive Assistant: Ms. Kaitelin Gillis

    350 Sparks Street, Suite 201
    Delta Hotel Office Tower
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1R 7S8

    Tel.: (613) 232-3216
    Fax:
    (613) 232-4262

    The M�tis National Council was established in 1983, following recognition of the M�tis as a distinct people with Aboriginal rights in the Constitution Act, 1982. The MNC has been recognized as the voice of the M�tis Nation in constitutional negotiations at the national level, and acts as the advocate and negotiator for the M�tis people with the Government of Canada and at national conferences and fora. It also represents the interests of the M�tis people on the international stage. The MNC has an organizational structure which is composed of local, regional and provincial associations and affiliated institutions.


    THE NATIVE WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

    President: Ms. Marilyn Buffalo

    9 Melrose Avenue
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K1Y 1T8

    Tel.: (613) 722-3033
    Fax:
    (613) 722-7687

    The Native Women’s Association of Canada is a federally incorporated organization which represents Aboriginal women of First Nations, Inuit and M�tis descent. Incorporated in 1974, its collective goal is to enhance, promote and foster the social, economic, cultural and political well-being of Aboriginal women.


    THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FRIENDSHIP CENTRES

    President: Mr. Dennis Francis
    Executive Director: Mr. Marc Wm. Maracle

    275 MacLaren Street
    Ottawa, Ontario
    K2P 0L9

    Tel.: (613) 563-4844
    Fax:
    (613) 594-3428

    The National Association of Friendship Centres (NAFC) is a national Aboriginal organization representing the needs of local community and cultural development organizations. Since 1958, Friendship Centres have served the cultural, social and economic needs of all Aboriginal peoples regardless of their legal status, background or place of origin, in urban areas across Canada. The NAFC was organized in 1972 to act as a national voice and a networking resource for the concerns of Friendship Centres and their members.


     

       

    1. PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEES

    The Solicitor General and the heads of agencies are called periodically throughout the year to appear before Parliamentary Committees on such matters as: Main Estimates; the review of proposed legislation; the management and operations of Government Departments; and at times, issues of special interest to the Committee arising from expressed public concern. Standing Committees also have mandated authority to review and report on future years’ expenditure plans within the context of the renewal of the Government’s Expenditure Management System. Once a Committee has completed its study of an issue, it has the authority to table a report in Parliament outlining its findings and recommendations. In this way, Committees are made accountable to the public and help to serve as vehicles for the dissemination of information to the public and to Parliamentarians. There is one Parliamentary Committee in particular which involves the Ministry of the Solicitor General; the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights, this committee has a Sub-Committee studying the Corrections and Conditional Release Act (CCRA) and a Sub-Committee studying Organized Crime.

    During 1999/00, the Committee reviewed several pieces of legislation having varying implications for the Solicitor General, including Bill C-7 - An Act to amend the Criminal Records Act and to amend another Act in consequence (flagging scheme for screening persons for positions of trust). The Committee also tabled in the House a report Toward Eliminating Impaired Driving in May, 1999.

    During the 36th Parliament, the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights has been composed of eighteen Members of Parliament: nine Liberal, three Canadian Alliance, two Bloc Qu�b��ois, one NDP and one Progressive Conservative. The Chair of the Committee has been a Liberal member and the co-Vice Chairs have been Liberal and Canadian Alliance Members of Parliament.

       

       

    1. FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL-TERRITORIAL (FPT) RELATIONS

    The following is a synopsis of the formal Federal-Provincial-Territorial (FPT) consultation mechanisms within the criminal justice field which involve the Solicitor General and the Ministry.

    MECHANISMS

    The purpose of the following fora is to share information, consult on major initiatives and to reach consensus on proposed criminal justice reforms.

    A review of FPT structures and mechanisms is currently underway in order to ascertain how well the existing process is working and to improve their efficiency and effectiveness.

    Ministers responsible for Justice Meetings

    The most senior level of consultation occurs at the Ministers Responsible for Justice forum. A national meeting takes place once a year. The meeting this year is scheduled for September 11-12, 2000 in Iqaluit, Nunavut. Last year’s meeting was held on December 2-3, 1999 in Vancouver. These meetings, convened and chaired jointly by the federal Minister of Justice and the federal Solicitor General, reflect a sectoral approach to criminal justice reform. A decision was taken at the October meeting 1998 (in Regina) meeting to have the host province also co-chair these meetings.

    In most provinces and territories, the responsibilities for policing and corrections reside with the Minster of Justice or Attorney General. Quebec, New Brunswick and Ontario retain separate portfolios with a primary mandate for Solicitor General issues.

    Deputy Ministers responsible for Justice Meetings

    Deputy Ministers Responsible for Justice (Attorneys General, Justice Ministers and Solicitors General) normally meet twice yearly in the spring and fall, with meetings divided into a "Strategic Issues" agenda and a "Business" agenda where specific items requiring discussion and decision are discussed. The business meeting is also used to develop the agenda for the Ministers Meeting. Deputy Attorneys General hold an additional meeting, often during the summer months.

    Deputies also hold teleconferences approximately every six weeks in order to address issues that can be managed through this mechanism, so that the face to face meetings may be more focussed.

    As a result of their deliberations, Deputies will give direction to working groups of officials, particularly the Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO), to further develop proposals or prepare material for discussion and decision at later meetings.

    Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO)

    The Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials (CCSO) is comprised of officials from Attorney General, Justice and Solicitor General Departments at the federal, provincial and territorial levels. The Committee meets, usually four times a year, primarily to manage the FPT business agenda for meetings of Deputies and Ministers which follow. The CCSO has also been given a mandate by Ministers to carry out specific studies and policy development to support decision making and report to Deputies and Ministers at FPT fora. The meetings focus on information sharing regarding emerging priority issues for federal and provincial jurisdictions, as well as status reports from the various work groups of CCSO.

    A CCSO Workplan is currently being developed by the Department of Justice with a view to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the CCSO working groups.

    National Justice Statistics Initiative

    The purpose of the National Justice Statistics Initiative is to collect and disseminate justice statistics and information to support the administration of justice in Canada. The governing body of the Initiative is the Justice Information Council (JIC). The JIC is chaired by the federal Deputy Minister of Justice and consists of the federal, provincial and territorial Deputy Ministers with responsibility for justice and the Chief Statistician. The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) carries out the work of the Initiative under the oversight of the Liaison Officers Committee (LOC). The LOC is comprised of senior officials from Attorney General, Justice and Solicitor General Departments at the federal, provincial and territorial levels.

    EXAMPLE AGENDA ITEMS FOR FPT MEETINGS

    Examples of recent FPT agenda items include the following:

     

    MINISTRY SUPPORT

    The policy directorates conduct FPT consultations concerning specific policy initiatives. There are also bilateral consultations and negotiations, such as negotiation of RCMP contracts, carried out in co-operation with the Agencies of the Ministry. The First Nations Policing Group undertakes tripartite discussions to achieve agreements.

    The Stragegic Policy and Integrated Justice (SPIJ) Directorate of the Department has the responsibility for supporting the Deputy Solicitor General and the Minister at FPT meetings and for providing advice on FPT issues. Regular liaison with the Department of Justice is undertaken to ensure a coordinated federal approach to these meetings. The Departmental policy branch directorates provide substantive information on their areas of responsibility to support this process. Within SPIJ, there is also an environmental scanning capacity to provide information and advice on emerging inter-governmental and regional issues.

       

       

    1. INTERNATIONAL FORA

    SUBJECT:

    Update on recent Ministry involvement at the international level.

    OVERVIEW:

    Given the growing inter-relationship of global criminal justice issues, the Ministry’s involvement at the international level continues to be important to the work of the Department and the Ministry Agencies. International attention to crime and security issues and obligations, such as the recent agreement of G-8 partners vis-�-vis organized crime, presents an additional opportunity for the Ministry to contribute to international discussions and resolutions of these issues. This contribution takes place at a policy level and an operational level through, for example the work of the RCMP and CSIS.

    KEY INTERNATIONAL FORA:

    G-8 Economic Summit. This is an international meeting of Heads of States/ Governments where governments have acknowledged crime as a global problem. Following the Halifax meeting held in 1995, two ministerial level meetings on terrorism have been held and an experts group on transnational organized crime was established. Forty recommendations on transnational organized crime were approved at the Lyon Summit in 1996. More recently, at the G-8 meeting in Birmingham, leaders called for increased international cooperation in the global fight against organized crime and agreed to establish financial information units where these do not already exist.

    The Solicitor General has participated in the first meeting of G-8 Ministers of Justice and the Interior on high-tech crime which was hosted by Attorney General Janet Reno in December 1997. A second Ministerial meeting on crime issues was held in October 1999 in Moscow, after the Cologne Summit, with the participation of the Department of the Solicitor General. On December 15, 1998, a ministerial videoconference, involving the Ministers of Justice and the Interior, occurred to take stock of countries’ progress in implementing the remit from the Birmingham Summit.

    United Nations (UN). Ministry UN activities relate to the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) and Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (CCPCJ). The theme of Transnational Organized Crime (TOC) is a principal focus of the UN’s current work in the criminal justice area, with the recognition of a global Convention on TOC to be completed in 2000 (along with related protocols on migrant smuggling, trafficking in human beings and firearms smuggling). The Tenth UN Congress on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders was held in April 2000.

    The United Nations Centre for International Crime Prevention in Vienna, at the request of the government of Kazakhstan, invited CSC to participate in a multilateral project to promote corrections reform. A mission of experts, including a CSC representative, traveled to that country and met with Kazakhstan prison officials to develop a program of technical assistance in promoting "good governance" within the prison system and to develop a basic training program.

    Organization of American States (OAS). The Ministry’s involvement is in the person of Senior Assistant Deputy Solicitor General Paul E. Kennedy who is the principle delegate for Canada to the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) of the OAS. Officials from the Department and the RCMP also participate as members of the Canadian delegation to CICAD. CICAD addresses drug and money laundering issues at the hemispheric level. In May 1998, the former Deputy Solicitor General Jean T. Fournier was elected Chair of a working group to develop a Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM) to assess the member states’ efforts in dealing with the drug problem. Within the span of six meetings, with the final one being in Ottawa in August 1999, the working group developed a standard questionnaire with a common set of indicators, an evaluation procedure, and a process for the first round of evaluation. The MEM is currently being implemented on a test basis. Member-states have responded to the questionnaire and their responses are being evaluated by a group of experts comprised of one representative from each of the 34 states. The group of experts, referred to as the Governmental Experts Group (GEG), is scheduled to complete country evaluations by the end of 2000 so that they may, along with a hemispheric report, be presented at the upcoming Summit of the Americas in April 2001 in Quebec City. The Department and CSIS also participate at the officials level in OAS sponsored conferences on countering terrorism. In November 1998, the Director of CSIS led a Canadian delegation to an OAS Terrorism Conference in Mardel Plata, Argentina.

    EUROPOL. EUROPOL officially began in the fall of 1998 subsequent to ratification of the EUROPOL Convention by Member States. On November 5-6, 1998, the first Canadian delegation, including representatives from the Ministry of the Solicitor General, visited EUROPOL. In April 2000, Canada and selected other countries participated in the first stage of formal negotiations with EUROPOL (the European Union) on the establishment of information sharing agreements.

    Financial Action Task Force. Founded by the Group of Seven (G-7) at the 1989 Paris Summit, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) is the key international forum addressing money laundering. The FATE consists of 28 member countries and regional organizations. A number of international bodies, including Interpol, the United Nations Drug Control Program (UNDCP) and the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (C-FATF) have observer status. In its first year, the FATF drew up a list of 40 recommendations to combat money laundering through legal, regulatory and law enforcement measures. The recommendations were since revised and updated in 1996. The FATF has introduced a programme of mutual evaluation, assessing each member’s compliance with the 40 recommendations, and advising on how better compliance might be achieved. The Department of Finance heads the Canadian delegation, which generally consists of representatives from this department, Foreign Affairs, Justice and the RCMP.

    Canada-U.S. Cross-Border Crime Forum. The Solicitor General and U.S. Attorney General (Janet Reno) agreed in 1997 to establish the Canada-U.S. Cross-Border Crime Forum. The Forum focuses on broad issues such as the impact of cross-border crime on communities, telemarketing fraud, money laundering, missing children, crimes using computers and other emerging issues. The Forum has met four times to date, most recently on June 9, 2000 in Washington.

       

       

    1. SOLICITOR GENERAL CANADA 2000/2001 ESTIMATES, PART III
    2.  

       

    3. BASIC REFERENCE MATERIALS

    Security

     

    The National Counter-Terrorism Plan (NCTP) (Revised 2000)

     

    Report of the Special Senate Committee on Security and Intelligence (1999).

     

    Annual Report 1997-1998, Security Intelligence Review Committee (1998)

     

    On Course: National Security for the 1990s the Government's response to In Flux (Secretariat, 1991)

     

    In Flux But Not in Crisis - Report of the Special Committee on the Five Year Review of the CSIS Act and Security Offences Act (1990)

     

    The Report of the Second Special Committee of the Senate on Terrorism and Public Safety (1989)

     

    Report of the Senate Special Committee on Terrorism and Public Safety (1987)

     

    People and Process in Transition - Report to the Solicitor General by the Independent Advisory Team on the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (the Osbaldeston Report, 1987)

    Policing

     

    National Forum on Youth Gangs (Solicitor General Canada, 2000)

     

    Sensible Steps in Community Policing (Solicitor General Canada, 1999)

     

    Summary of Consultations on Proposals to Amend the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) Act (Solicitor General Canada, 1999)

     

    Guidelines for Agents and Peace Officers Designated by the Solicitor General of Canada (1999)

     

    Annual Statement on Organized Crime (Solicitor General Canada, 1998)

     

    Highlights of the Organized Crime Impact Study (1998)

     

    A Parliamentarian's Guide to Crime Prevention (Department of Justice, 1998)

     

    Canada's Drug Strategy: Toward 2000 (Health Canada, 1998)

     

    Creation of a suspicious transaction reporting and cross-border currency reporting regime (Solicitor General Canada, 1998)

     

    National Police Services - Summary of Consultations
    (Solicitor General & RCMP, 1998)

     

    Establishing a National DNA Data Bank - Summary of Consultations
    (Solicitor General Canada, 1997)

     

    COLLABORATE! Health and Enforcement in Partnership
    (Solicitor General Canada, August 1997)

     

    National Police Services - Consultation Document
    (Solicitor General & RCMP, 1997)

     

    First Nations Policing Policy (Secretariat 1996)

     

    Establishing a National DNA Data Bank - Consultation Document
    (Solicitor General Canada, 1996)

     

    Health and Enforcement in Partnership: How the Police, Justice, Community Groups and Social Agencies are Working Together to Build Healthier, Safer Neighbourhoods (Solicitor General, 1995)

     

    Indian Policing Policy Review: Task Force Report (DIAND, 1990)

    Corrections

     

    A Work in Progress: The Corrections and Conditional Release Act (May 2000)

     

    Corrections and Conditional Release Statistical Overview (November, 1999)

     

    Basic Facts About Federal Corrections (CSC, 1999)

     

    Corrections Population Growth Report for Federal/Provincial/Territorial Ministers Responsible for Justice – Second Progress Report (October 1998)

     

    Information Systems on Sex Offenders Against Children and Other Vulnerable Groups – A Report to Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers (October 1998)

     

    Sentence Calculation – How Does It Work (October 1998)

     

    Towards a Just, Peaceful and Safe Society: The Corrections and Conditional Release Act Five Years Later – Consolidated Report ( March 1998)

     

    Towards a Just, Peaceful and Safe Society: The Corrections and Conditional Release Act Five Years Later – Consultation Paper (March 1998)

     

    Understanding and Evaluating the Role of Elders and Traditional Healing in Sex Offender Treatment for Aboriginal Offenders (March 1998)

     

    Developing & Evaluating Justice Projects in Aboriginal Communities: A Review of the Literature (1998)

     

    Examining Aboriginal Corrections in Canada (June, 1996)

     

    Sentence Calculation – A Handbook for Judges and Lawyers (February 1996)

    Annual Documents

     

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police Dependants Pension Fund and Superannuation Account Annual Report

     

    Access to Information and Privacy Act Annual Report

     

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police Commissioners Annual Report on Firearms

     

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police Public Complaints Commission Annual Report

     

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police External Review Committee Annual Report

     

    Canadian Security Intelligence Service Public Report

     

    Security Intelligence Review Committee Annual Report

     

    Correctional Service of Canada Corporate Operational Plan

     

    Office of the Correctional Investigator Annual Report

     

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police Witness Protection Program

     

    The Solicitor General’s Annual Report on the Use of Electronic Surveillance

     

    The following agencies in the Ministry of the Solicitor General annually produce a Part III of the Government of Canada’s Main Estimates:

     
    • Department of the Solicitor General Canada (includes IG of CSIS)
    • The Royal Canadian Mounted Police
    • The RCMP External Review Committee
    • The RCMP Public Complaints Commission
    • The Correctional Service of Canada
    • The Office of the Correctional Investigator
    • The National Parole Board

     

    DEPARTMENT OF THE SOLICITOR GENERAL OF CANADA STATUTES

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