California Highways
www.cahighways.org

California Highways

Routes 9 through 16


powered by FreeFind

California Highways Home Page
State Highway Routes
Numbered County Highways
State Highway Types
Interstate Types and History
Highway Numbering Conventions
State Highway Renumberings
State Highway Chronology
Maps El Camino Real Related WWW Links Site Change Log Sources and Credits

Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16


State Shield

State Route 9



Routing From Route 1 near Santa Cruz to Route 17 near Los Gatos via Waterman Gap and Saratoga Gap and along the ridge between the San Lorenzo and Pescadero Creeks.
Post 1964 Signage History Until 1981, this began at Route 17 in Santa Cruz.
Pre 1964 Signage History This route consisted of two segments:
  1. The first segment ran between Santa Cruz and the present northern Route 9/Route 236 junction near Waterman Gap. This segment was LRN 116, and was added to the state highway system in 1933.
  2. The second segment ran between Route 236 and Route 17 in Los Gatos (through Saratoga). This segment was LRN 42, and was added to the state highway system in 1913.

This route was signed as Route 9 in the initial state signage of routes in 1934.

Pre-1964 State Shield In Saratoga, the original signage of Route 9 diverged from the present signage. The signed Route 9, as LRN 114, proceeded North on Saratoga-Sunnyvale Road into Sunnyvale via Mathilda Ave, thence to a jct with Alviso-Milpitas Road (currently signed as Route 237), and a junction with Bypass US-101 (LRN 68). It appears this segment was defined in 1933, but is no longer part of the state highway system.

Pre-1964 State Shield The route signed as Route 9 then proceeded on the current Route 237 alignment into Milpitas. This was LRN 113. It ran east to Route 17 (LRN 69; now I-880).

Between Milpitas and Warm Springs, Route 9 ran N along a LRN 69 (Route 17, now I-880) to present-day Route 262 near Warm Springs. This segment, as LRN 69, was added to the state highway system in 1933.

Near Warm Springs, Route 9 ran along the present-day Route 262 routing between Route 17 (present-day I-880) and Route 21 (present-day Route 680). This was part of LRN 5, defined in 1909.

Between the present-day Route 262/I-680 junction near Warm Springs and Irvington, Route 9 ran cosigned with Route 21 to Irvington, near Mission San Jose. This segment was LRN 5, and was added to the state highway system in 1909.

Near the mission (at Mission Blvd), Route 9 diverged, continuing signed as Route 9 (but still LRN 5) along what is now Route 238, ending at US 580 (present-day I-580). This was also added in 1909.

Scenic Highway [SHC 263.3] From Route 1 near Santa Cruz to Route 236 near Boulder Creek; and from Route 236 near Boulder Creek to Route 236 near Waterman Gap; and from Route 236 near Waterman Gap to Route 35; and from Saratoga to Route 17 near Los Gatos; and from Blaney Plaza in Saratoga to Route 35.
Interregional Route [SHC 164.10] Between the north urban limits of Santa Cruz and the south urban limits of San Jose.
Overall statistics for Route 9:
  • Total Length (1995): 39 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 3,200 to 34,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 18; Urbanized: 21.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 20 mi; FAS: 9 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 4 mi; Minor Arterial: 16 mi; Collector: 19 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Santa Cruz and Santa Clara.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 9 was defined to run:
  1. From LRN 79 near Saticoy to LRN 4 near San Fernando. This segment was signed as Route 118. This segment was added to LRN 9 in 1933.
  2. From near San Fernando to San Bernardino. This routing was signed as Route 118. At some point, the signage as Route 118 terminated, and the remainder of the route between Pasadena and San Bernardino was signed as US 66. The routing of LRN 9 (US 66) through Pasadena was: right on Shamrock Ave. in Monrovia, left on Foothill Blvd. through Arcadia into Pasadena, left on Santa Anita Ave. right on Colorado Street and left on Fair Oaks Ave. This is the original routing of LRN 9, as defined in 1909.

    LRN 9 later applied to the routing of what is now I-210 between Pasadena (the Route 134/I-210 junction) to Route 30.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 10



Routing
  1. From Route 1 in Santa Monica to Route 5 near Seventh Street in Los Angeles.
    Interstate Submissions Approved as chargeable Interstate on 9/15/1955.
    Pre 1964 Signage History State Shield Interstate Shield The segment was LRN 173, and was defined as part of the state highway system since 1933. Before this was reserved for the freeway, this was Route 26 and ran along Olympic Blvd.
    Naming This portion is named the "Santa Monica Freeway"; the first segment opened in 1961 and the freeway was completed in 1966. It was named by the State Highway Commission on April 25, 1957.

  2. From Route 101 near Mission Road in Los Angeles to the Arizona state line at the Colorado River via the vicinity of Monterey Park, Pomona, Colton, Indio, and Chiriaco Summit, and via Blythe.
    Post 1964 Signage History On July 1, 1964, the routing for this part was defined to began at Route 5. In 1968, the portion from Route 101 to Route 5 was transferred from former Route 110.
    Pre 1964 Signage History State Shield Interstate Shield This segment was made up of four distinct parts:
    1. Between Route 5 and San Bernardino, this was LRN 26. This segment of LRN 26 was added to the state highway system in 1931. This portion was signed as US 70/US 99.
    2. Between San Bernardino and Indio, this was also part of LRN 26. This portion of LRN 26 was defined in 1915, and was signed as US 60/US 70/US 99.
    3. Between Indio and Shavers Summit, this was part of LRN 64. This segment of LRN 64 was defined in 1931. This portion was signed as US 60/US 70.
    4. Between Shavers Summit and the Arizona state line, this was LRN 26. This segment of LRN 64 was defined in 1919, and was also signed as US 60/US 70. In Blythe, this was Hobsonway, and used a different bridge to cross the Colorado. The current bridge was built in 1960, with improvements in 1974. No remnants of the original bridge remain.
    Business Routes
    • Montclair and Ontario: Holt Blvd (former business route)
    • E of I-15 along Valley Blvd through Colton (marked at least once).
    • Indio: Indio Blvd. This doesn't dump you easily back onto I-10 on the E side; you end up on Route 111 and then take the Route 86S expressway. This routing is old US 99.
    • Blythe: Hobsonway. This ends on the AZ side with an odd loop under I-10 at the AZ border for E bound traffic.
    Naming The portion of this freeway from US 101 to Route 215 is named the "San Bernardino" Freeway; the first segment opened in 1943 and the last segment in 1957. It was named by the State Highway Commission. Originally, the segment that opened in 1943 (from US 101 to Route 215) was named the "Ramona Expressway".

    The portion of this freeway in San Bernardino and Riverside counties is named the "Redlands" Freeway.

    The portion of this freeway near Indio in Riverside County between the Jefferson Street and Indio Boulevard interchange and the junction with Route 86 is officially named the "Doctor June McCarroll Memorial Freeway." Doctor June McCarroll arrived in California in 1904, when she moved to Indio in order to place her ailing husband in a health camp for persons infected with tuberculosis. In Indio, she traveled, at first by horse and buggy and later by horseback, to practice medicine on five Indian reservations. She later became the doctor retained by the Southern Pacific Railroad to treat its employees in the Coachella Valley. In later life, she expressed regrets that younger doctors were seemingly unable to function without modern hospitals and other conveniences when she had sometimes operated on kitchen tables, explaining "I would clear off the table, tie the patient down, and administer the anesthetic". She is also credited with starting the first library in the Coachella Valley. He is also known for her role in initiating the painting of centerlines upon streets and highways. In 1924, after she and the Indio Women's Club and the California Federation of Women's Clubs proposed it, the idea of painting a centerline on state highways was adopted by the California Highway Commission, and the first white centerline was painted, by hand with a paintbrush, on Indio Boulevard, coincidentally, on the street where Doctor June McCarroll was then living. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 58, Chapter 105, August 17, 2000.

    The portion of this freeway extending five miles to the east and five miles to the west of mile marker number 84 in Riverside County, located east of the Chiriaco Summit, is officially designated the "Veterans' Memorial Freeway". Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 137, Chapter 104, in 1994.

    This portion of this freeway from Route 86 near Indio to I-5 in Los Angeles is designated as part of "Historic US Highway 99" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 19, Chapter 73, in 1993.

    Named Structures Bridge 53-1367, the I-10/I-215 separation in Los Angeles county, is named the "James A. Guthrie Memorial Interchange". It was built in 1960, and named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 57, Chapter 193, in 1970.

    Bridge 54-592, the I-10/Route 30 interchange in San Bernardino county, is designated the "Chresten Knudsen Interchange". It was built in 1962, and was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 21, Chapter 47, in 1991.

    Bridge 54-909 on I-15, the I-15/I-10 separation in San Bernadino county near Ontario, is named the "Daniel D. Mikesell Interchange". It was built in 1975, and was named in Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 84, in 1980.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Wildwood, in San Bernardino County 1 mi W of Calimesa.
    • Brookside, in Riverside County, 3 mi. W of Beaumont.
    • Whitewater, in Riverside County 1 mi W of Whitewater.
    • Cactus City, in Riverside County 15 mi E of Indio.
    • Wiley's Well, in Riverside County 15 mi W of Blythe.
    National Trails The portion of this segment between Indio (via Mecca) and Blythe was part of the "Hassayamph Trail". This portion is also named the "Sunkist Trail".
    Commuter Lanes HOV lanes have been constructed from Hebert Street in downtown Los Angeles to I-710 in El Monte. This is called the "El Monte Busway". It opened in January 1973, requires three or more occupants, and is in operation 24 hours a day.

    HOV lanes also exist from the San Bernardino County line to I-15. They require two or more people, and operate 24 hours a day.

    HOV lanes are planned as follows: (1) from I-405 to I-110; (2) from Baldwin to I-605; (3) from I-605 to Puente Avenue; (4) from Puente Avenue to Citrus Avenue; from Citrus Avenue to Route 57 and (6) from Route 57 to the San Bernardino County line. It appears some funding for these lanes is on the Agenda of the March 2001 CTC Meeting. [Note: If any of these lanes are opened, please let me know.]

    Scenic Highway [SHC 263.3] From Route 38 near Redlands to Route 62 near Whitewater.
    Blue Star Memorial Highway The portion of this route that is former US 99 was designated as a "North-South Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Senate Concurrent Resolution 33, Ch. 82 in 1947.
    Interregional Route [SHC 164.10] Between the east urban limits of San Bernardino-Riverside and the Arizona state line.
Naming In additional to the other designations noted, Route 10 (in its entirety) has been officially designated the "Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Highway", although on the east coast, the corresponding sign is not on Route 10. It acquired this name in Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 106, Chapter 71, in 1976.
Overall statistics for Route 10:
  • Total Length (1995): 243 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 6,700 to 363,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 134; Sm. Urban 14; Urbanized: 94.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 241 mi; FAU: 1 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 243 mi.
  • Significant Summits: San Gorgonio Pass (2626 ft) and Chiriaco Summit (1710 ft)
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside.
Post 1964 Signage History US Highway Shield Prior to the designation of this routing as Interstate 10 on July 1, 1964, a routing similar to the current Route 10 routing had the designation of US 70. US 70 began in downtown Los Angeles, followed Valley Blvd, San Bernardino Road, Covina Hills Road, and Holt Street into Ontario, and thence to points east. Between Los Angeles and Palm Springs, the routing was concurrant with US 99.
Pre 1964 Signage History Pre-1964 State Shield Between the initial state signage of routes in 1934 and sometime between 1960 and 1963, the routing (LRN 174) from US 101A (Route 1, Lincoln Blvd) in Los Angeles along Manchester and Firestone Blvds to US 101 in Norwalk was signed as Route 10. It was later signed as Route 42. It appears the LRN 174 routing was defined in 1933. Specifics are not available, but the guess is that the resignage occurred in the late 1950s in preparation for the interstate. (1956 and 1960 maps shows it as Route 10; the 1963 state map (pre-renumbering) shows it as Route 42).

Before signage as US-101, the routing (signed as Route 10, but LRN 174) continued on down to Orangethorpe, and then across Orangethorpe past Route 101 (Spadra Road, at that time) and E through Atwood, until joining the old surface route equivalent to US 101 (LRN 2). Some maps show Route 10 ending at the junction with Route 18 (later renumbered as Route 14, but cosigned with US 91; LRN 175 and LRN 178).

State Shield On July 1, 1964, LRN 174 (at one time signed as Route 10), between US 101A and US 101 in Norwalk, was officially designated Route 42, and has since been deleted from the state highway system.

Interstate Submissions Approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; the portion from Route 101 to Route 5 was originally to have been designated as I-110, with I-10 sharing a route with Route 5 between the San Bernardino and Santa Monica portions of Route 10. The I-110 designation was deleted as chargeable interstate in August 1965 and a designation of I-10 was used to the Route 101 interchange.
Other WWW Links
Freeway [SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 10 was defined to run from LRN 2 near San Lucas to the Sequoia National Park line via Coalinga, Hanford, and Visalia. This routing was (and is) mostly signed as Route 198. It was defined in three segments: From Hanford to US 99 in 1909, from US 101 to Hanford in 1915, and from US 99 to Sequoia National Park in 1919. The portion from Coalinga to Oilfields is signed as Route 33.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 11



Routing From the northerly border of the new Federal Port of Entry and east of the Otay Mesa Port of Entry to near the junction of Route 125 and Route 905.
Post 1964 Signage History Post-1964 Legistlative Route Graphic Interstate Shield In 1964, Route 11 was defined to run from San Pedro to Route 248 (Colorado Blvd) in Pasadena. In 1978, the portion of Route 11 between Route 10 and San Pedro was approved as chargable interstate, and was assigned the number I-110, although the route was not signed as interstate at that time. In 1981, the entire routing was renumbered as Route 110 for continuity of numbering purposes, with the portion S of Route 10 using an interstate shield, and the portion N of Route 10 using a state highway shield.

The current routing was defined in 1994. No specific routing was identified at that time. This will connect up with a new Mexican freeway called Tijuana 2000, which will be a bypass connecting the new port of entry with Rosarito.

Pre 1964 Signage History Before the present-day Route 110 freeway was constructed, pre-1994 Route 11 traveled along Gaffey, Figueroa St, Ave 22, and Linda Vista to Route 118. The route was been signed as Route 11 since the initial state signage of routes in 1934. Circa 1940, the route was co-signed with federal routes: Route 66 (US 66) between Pasadena and Downtown Los Angeles, and Route 6 (US 6) between downtown and San Pedro. On July 1, 1964, the routings for US 6 and US 66 were truncated, and the route was signed only as Route 11.

The original routing was LRN 165, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933.

In 1935, a new route was defined for the planned Arroyo Seco Parkway. This route was LRN 205, and corresponds to the present routing. When LRN 205 was defined, the roughly parallel LRN 165 portion was signed as Route 11 and Alt US-66.

National Trails See Route 110 for pre-1994 trails information.
Freeway [SHC 253.1] Entire route.
Status Toll Road This is planned to connect with the Mexican Tiajuana Loop Road at the East Otay Mesa border crossing. This will likely be a toll road.

Overall statistics for post-1994 Route 11:

  • Total Length (1995): 4 miles, unconstructed
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 4.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego.
Other WWW Links
Status The current routing is unconstructed.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 11 was defined to run from LRN 75 near Antioch to the Nevada line near Lake Tahoe via Sacramento and Placerville. This routing started near Antioch at signed Route 4 (LRN 75), and ran to Sacramento signed as Route 24. This is present-day Route 160, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1933.

In downtown Sacramento, LRN 11 diverged from signed Route 24 at 16th S, and ran N to Capitol Ave (signed as Route 16).

LRN 11 then ran along Capitol Ave to 30th Street, where it intersected signed US-50/US-99. This latter segment is present-day Business Loop 80 (real Route 50), and was once planned to be part of the first incarnation of I-305. This was part of the 1897 LRN 11.

LRN 11 then continued E out of Sacramento along Folsom Blvd as US-50, and remained signed as US-50 to the Nevada state line. In 1963, there was an alternate routing for LRN 11 from Sacramento that approximated the future freeway routing. The portion from US 99 in Sacramento to Folsom, and the portion from Placerville to Lake Tahoe was defined as part of the state highway system in 1897. The remainder of the route was defined in 1909.


State Shield

State Route 12



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Valley Ford to Route 121 near Sonoma via Santa Rosa.
    Pre 1964 Signage History This corresponds to what was all LRN 51 by 1959, although that was not always the case:
    • Between Valley Ford and Sebastopol, present-day Route 116 was signed as Route 12, and was LRN 104, defined in 1933. In the 1964 renumbering, Route 12 was realigned along an extension of LRN 51 defined in 1959 between Route 1 and Sebastopol.
    • Between Route 116 near Sebastopol and US 101, this was an extension of LRN 51, as defined in 1933.
    • Between US 101 and Route 121, this was the original portion of LRN 51, defined in 1919.

    From Schellville easterly to Napa, the route was cosigned as Route 12/Route 37 (now Route 12/Route 121), and was LRN 8. This is technically part of Route 121; LRN 8 dates back to 1909.

    Naming The portion of this route constructed to freeway standards is named the "Sebastopol" Freeway.

    The portion of this route running through Sonoma County is called the "Valley of the Moon Scenic Route". "Valley of the Moon" was the name Jack London, resident of Glen Ellen, coined for this area. The first such sign with this name is when the Farmers Lane portion ends in Santa Rosa. Another name for this portion if the Sonoma Highway.

    South of the town of Sonoma, Route 12 is called Broadway until it intersects Route 121 near Schellville. Route 12/Route 121 to Napa County is called alternately "Fremont Drive" or "Carneros Highway." The latter term continues into Napa County.

    Route 12 from Sebastopol to Santa Rosa is named the "Luther Burbank Memorial Highway". Luther Burbank (1849-1926) was a famous horticulturist. It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 4, Chapter 11 in 1940.

    In Suisun City, near Denverton Road off Route 12, there is an "Old Route 12".

    Named Structures In Santa Rosa is the "Parker B. Rice Memorial Bridge" (just east of Route 101). Parker Rice was a leader in veterans' and other service organizations. He was an Army Air Corps Mechanic in World War II. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 68, Chapter 74 in 1996.
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] From Route 1 near Valley Ford to Route 101 at Santa Rosa; from Route 101 near Santa Rosa to Melita Road near Santa Rosa. Note: the entire segment was defined as part of the F&E; system in 1959; in 1969, the portion from Melita Road to Route 29 was deleted from the F&E; system.
    Scenic Highway [SHC 263.3] From Route 101 near Santa Rosa to Route 121 near Sonoma.
    Status Unconstructed State Shield Unconstructed from Route 1 to Route 116. Constructed to freeway standards for 2 miles in Santa Rosa.

  2. From Route 29 in the vicinity of Napa to Route 80 near Cordelia.
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E; system in 1959.
    Status The California Transportion Commission, in September 2000, considered a Traffic Congestion Relief Program proposal to reconstruct the I-80/I-680/Route 12 interchange; it would be a 12-interchange complext constructed in seven stages. The proposal was $1 million for stage 1; the total estimated cost was $13 million.
    Pre 1964 Signage History Circa 1935, the first two segments of this routing were continuous. Route 12 was dual-signed with Route 37 (now Route 121) between Sonoma and Napa, and with Route 29 from Napa for a short distance S of Napa. The portion that was cosigned with Route 29 is present-day Route 221.

    From Napa, signed Route 12 continued southerly to Cordelia in two segments: one stretch signed as Route 12/Route 37 (now Route 12/Route 121, and another stretch signed only as Route 12. This was also LRN 8; defined in 1909.


  3. From Route 80 near Fairfield to Route 99 near Lodi via Rio Vista.
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] Entire portion; constructed to freeway standards from Route 80 to Fairfield.
    Post 1964 Signage History Until 1976, the definition was formerly discontinuous at Route 84. The portion from Route 84 at Rio Vista to Route 84 [Former Route 160] near Rio Vista was transferred from Route 84.
    Pre 1964 Signage History This segment was signed as Route 12, but was LRN 53. It was defined in 1919.
    Double Fine Zones Between the intersection of Walters Road in Suisun and the intersection with Lower Sacramento Road in Lodi. Authorized by Senate Bill 155, Chapter 169, on July 23, 1999.
    Naming The Rio Vista Bridge is officially named the "Helen Madere Memorial Bridge". Ms. Madere was a former vice-mayor of Rio Vista, who was a key force behind the safety improvements that established a safety enhancement-double fine zone between Lodi and Suisun City on Route 12. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 100, Chapter 124, in 1998.

    The portion of Route 12 between Lower Sacramento Road and the Lodi City limits at Route 99 is named the "Officer Rick Charles Cromwell Memorial Freeway". Officer Cromwell was a City of Lodi Motorcycle Police Officer who died in the line of duty while performing traffic enforcment on Route 12 in Lodi on December 9, 1998. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 38, Chapter 128, on 9/21/1999.


  4. From Route 99 near Lodi to Route 88 near Lockford.
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E; system in 1959.
    Pre 1964 Signage History This segment was signed as Route 12, but was LRN 24 between US 99 and Route 88. It was defined in 1909.

  5. From Route 88 near Clements to Route 49 near San Andreas.
    Pre 1964 Signage History This segment was signed as Route 12, and was also LRN 24. It was defined in 1909.
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] Entire portion. Defined as part of the F&E; system in 1959.
Pre 1964 Signage History This route was signed as Route 12 as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934.
Overall statistics for Route 12:
  • Total Length (1995): 116 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 5,300 to 55,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 94; Sm. Urban 6; Urbanized: 25.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 116 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 75 mi; Minor Arterial: 41 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Sonoma, Napa, Solano, San Joaquin, and Calaveras.
Interregional Route [SHC 164.11] Entire route.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 12 was defined to run from Point Loma to El Centro via San Diego. There were two segments:
  1. Starting at Cabrillo National Monument in Point Loma, the routing, signed as US 80 (now Route 209) ran northerly to US 101 (LRN 2). This portion of LRN 12 was defined in 1933.
  2. From US 101, LRN 12 turned easterly, and continued signed as US 80 to El Centro. The present day signage for this route is approximately I-8. This portion of LRN 12 was defined in 1909.

At El Centro, LRN 12 ended, but US 80 continued easterly as LRN 27.


State Shield

State Route 13



Routing From Route 61 near the Oakland International Airport to Route 61 near Emeryville via the vicinity of Lake Temescal.
Post 1964 Signage History At one time, this route was signed as I-5W.
Pre 1964 Signage History Between I-580 and the current Route 61 routing (Doolittle Dr., LRN 226 and LRN 258), present-day Route 13 was unsigned, but was LRN 258 (added to the state highway system in 1959).

Between Warren Blvd and US 50 (now I-580) and Ashby Ave (Route 24, LRN 206), Broadway (unsigned, LRN 75), Route 13 was partially constructed as of 1963 (it was only constructed between Route 24 and Joaquin Miller Road). The routing of present Route 13 (then unsigned) was along Warren Blvd and then an upspecified routing to US 50 (LRN 5). This was LRN 227, added to the state highway system in 1947.

Between Route 24 and I-80 (former US 40), present-day Route 13 was LRN 206, but was signed as Route 24. This segment was added to the state highway system in 1935.

Between I-80 (former US 40) and present-day Route 61, the routing (unconstructed) was also LRN 206. This portion of LRN 206 was added to the state highway system in 1959.

Pre-1964 State Shield In the initial 1934 state signage of routes, Route 13 was defined to run between Santa Cruz and US 101 at San Rafael via San Jose, Mt. Eden, and Oakland. This appears to be the route of present-day Route 17 and I-880. The renumbering as Route 17 likely occurred in the mid-to-late 1930s.

Naming Route 13 from Interstate 580 to Route 24 in Oakland is named the "Warren Freeway". Named for Earl Warren, former California Governor and Supreme Court Chief Justice. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 96, Chapt 166 in 1957.

This is also "Tunnel" Road and "Ashby" Avenue.

Status Unconstructed State Shield Unconstructed for 4 miles from Route 61 to Route 580. Constructed as freeway from I-580 to Route 24. Route 61 was a planned freeway that paralleled I-80 near Berkeley.
Interstate Submissions The portion from Route 580 to Route 24 was submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1945; it was not accepted.
Freeway [SHC 253.2] From Route 61 near the Oakland International Airport to Route 24; from Route 80 to Route 61 near Emeryville. Constructed to freeway standards from Route 580 to Route 24. The entire route was added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959; the portion from Route 24 to Route 80 was deleted in 1981.
Other WWW Links
  • Exit Lists: CA 13 (SPUI)
Overall statistics for Route 13:
  • Total Length (1995): 10 miles traversable; 4 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 20,800 to 58,000
  • Milage Classification: Urbanized: 14.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 10 mi
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 10 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 13 ran from LRN 4 (US 99) at Salida to LRN 23 (US 395) via Sonora and Long Barn. It has the following pieces:
  • From US 99, this route was unsigned (it is presently Route 219) to the junction with Route 108. This portion of LRN 13 was added to the state highway system in 1909.
  • From the Route 219/Route 108 junction to Route 120. This is also part of the 1909 LRN 13, but was signed only as Route 108.
  • Between the Route 120/Route 108 junction and Route 49. This was also part of the 1909 LRN 13 definition. It was originally part of Route 120, but was transferred to Route 108 in 1965. It is cosigned as Route 108/Route 120.
  • Between Route 49 and Sonora, this was also part of the 1909 LRN 13. It was signed only as Route 108.
  • Between Sonora and Long Barn, this was part of a 1919 extension to LRN 13. It was signed as Route 108.
  • Between Long Barn and US 395, this was part of a 1901 definition (?) of LRN 13. It was signed as Route 108.


State Shield

State Route 14



Routing
  1. From Route 1 north of the intersection of Sunset Boulevard northwest of Santa Monica to Route 5 near Tunnel Station.
    Status Unconstructed Unconstructed (22 miles).
    Post 1964 Signage History The freeway and expressway system plans, both in the mid 1950's and 1960's, were that this route would be constructed to freeway standards down Reseda Blvd and across the Santa Monica Mountains to intersect with the Pacific Coast Freeway, Route 1. Currently, the only clue of this plan is that the milepost for Route 14 does not go to 0.00 at the I-5 junction.

    The cross mountain roadway was first proposed in the early 1920s. By 1928, various San Fernando Valley Chambers of Commerce were showing a potential "Reseda to the Sea", that meandered through Temescal Canyon to Pacific Coast Highway. The road continued to be proposed through the 1930s and 1940s as a vital 25-mile roadway. By the 1950s, it was listed as a potential freeway, as evidenced by its definition as LRN 290.

    It became controversial in the 1960s. San Fernando Valley leaders, in the 1960s, persuaded the Los Angeles City Council to study the feasibility of building it as a toll road, but that never happened.

    It should be noted that the intersection of Temescal Canyon Road was designed large enough to handle traffic at the beach end, but the construction of Palisades High School in 1961 scuttled that route.

    Opposition to the route grew in the 1970s and 1980s. In 1998, Los Angeles gave up the cities easement between Winford and Mulholland drives in Tarzana. However, the route still shows up on a few city maps.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Unconstructed By 1963, this segment was LRN 290. It was defined in 1959, but was never constructed.
    Naming If constructed, this segment would have been named the "Reseda" Freeway.

  2. From Route 5 at Los Angeles near Tunnel Station to Route 58.
    Status Constructed to freeway standards. The first segment opened in 1963; the last segment opened in 1974. There were once plans to build a bypass in the Mojave area to the west of town. Now, if this ever gets built, it will be to the east of town. There are plans for expressway sections in the next few years from Mojave north to the present terminus north of California City and between Redrock Canyon and Route 178 East.

    It appears that a portion of the route (I'm guessing the original Sierra Highway routing) has been vacated: PM R27.0 in the City of Santa Clarita.

    Pre 1964 Signage History State Shield Circa 1935, this portion of the route was numbered as Route 7. When state routes began to be shielded as US highways, this was resigned as US 6. This was LRN 23, and was defined as part of the state highway system in 1911.
    Naming Route 14 from Route 5 to Avenue D, North of Lancaster, is officially named the "Antelope Valley Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 57, Chapter 196, in 1957.

    The Route 5/Route 14 interchange is officially designated the "Clarence Wayne Dean Memorial Interchange". Clarence Wayne Dean was a Los Angeles Police Officer. After being awakened on January 17, 1994, by the Northridge earthquake, Mr. Dean was proceeding, in the early morning darkness on his police motorcycle, to his division for assignment in the damaged area fell to his demise at the collapsed interchange of Route 5 and Route 14 in Los Angeles County. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 111, Chapter 64, in 1994.

    The portion of this route that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., this entire segment) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943.

    National Trails Midland Trail Sign This segment was part of the "Midland Trail".
    Commuter Lanes HOV lanes are under construction or opened as follows:
    • I-5 to San Fernando Road. Construction starts in January 2001.
    • San Fernando Road/Route 26 to Sand Canyon Road.
    • Sand Canyon Road to Escondido.
    • Escondido to Pearblossom.
    • Pearblossom to Avenue P-8.
    Other WWW Links

  3. From Route 58 to Route 395 near Little Lake via the vicinity of Antelope Valley.
    Pre 1964 Signage History State Shield In the 1934 initial state signage, this portion of the route was numbered as Route 7. When state routes began to be shielded as US highways, this was resigned as US 6. This was also part of the 1911 extension of LRN 23.
    Naming The portion of this route that was cosigned with US 6 (i.e., the entire segment) was named the "Grand Army of the Republic Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 33, Chapter 73, in 1943.

    Historically, this segment was part of "El Camino Sierra" (Road to the Mountains).

    National Trails Midland Trail Sign This segment was part of the "Midland Trail".
    Scenic Highway [SHC 263.3] Entire portion.
Other WWW Links
Overall statistics for Route 14:
  • Total Length (1995): 117 miles traversable; 22 miles unconstructed
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 3,200 to 127,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 86; Sm. Urban 6; Urbanized: 46.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 116 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 117 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, Kern.
Freeway [SHC 253.1] Entire route. Defined as part of the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.
Interregional Route [SHC 164.11] Entire route.
Pre 1964 Signage History Pre-1964 State Shield Between the initial state signage of routes and the 1964 renumbering, a different routing was signed as Route 14. This routing ran from Santa Ana Canyon Road (US 91 and Route 18, just east of the intersection of US 91/Route 18 and Route 55 (Tustin Avenue) to US 101A in Hermosa Beach, along Jefferson Street, Orangethorpe Avenue, Grand Avenue, Artesia Blvd, 174th Street, Redondo Beach Blvd, and Gould Avenue. It ended at Gould Avenue and Sepulveda Blvd. The routing was LRN 175, and was added to the state highway system in 1933. It was cosigned as Route 14/US 91 between the US 91/Route 55 junction and and the Orangethorpe/US 101 junction. It was renumbered as Route 91 on July 1, 1964. This routing is longer than the 1935 routing, which only went E as far as Artesia and Firestone, where it joined what was then numbered as Route 10. The 1935 routing also had a discontinuity between Normandie Ave and Alameda St, where Artesia Blvd did not cross. Until Artesia was complete between Hawthorne and Alameda, the routing used a detour than ran N on Alameda to Compton, W on Compton, a S job at Avalon, then W across Redondo Beach Blvd to Hawthorne Blvd.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 14 ran from Oakland to LRN 7 in Richmond at Cutting Blvd. LRN 14 started near LRN 5 (US 50, now I-580) near San Pablo and Peralta and ran to US 40 (LRN 7) near Cutting. Before the construction of the freeway, this was US 40. After the freeway was constructed, this route was signed as Business US 40. This is present-day Route 123.


Interstate Shield

Interstate 15



Routing
  1. From Route 5 in San Diego to Route 8.
    Post 1964 Signage History State Shield The segment between I-8 and I-805 (the 40th Street segment) is in the process of conversion to freeway standards. As soon as this conversion to freeway is completed, this will be resigned as I-15. Presently, it is 139(b) non-charable interstate milage.

    The segment between I-805 and I-5 is already freeway standard. Route 15 ends just south of the I-5 interchange at 32nd Street and Harbor Drive, in the community of Barrio Logan in San Diego. The portion connecting Harbor Drive is a ramp and not part of the route itself.

    Until 1969, this segment was Route 103.

    Pre 1964 Signage History Before the 1964 renumbering, this was part of US 395 between US 80 and US 101, and followed the current Route 163 routing (LRN 77, defined in 1931).

    In 1969, Route 103 (LRN 283, defined in 1959) was renumbered as Route 15, and former Route 15 was renumbered as Route 163. The Route 103 number was released for reused; it was reused in the Los Angeles are in 1983.

    Interstate Submissions State Shield Approved as 139(b) non-chargeable milage in 1984. Constructed to interstate standards from Route 5 to 1 mi N of Route 805. May be signed as state route until upgraded to interstate standards.
    Status Caltrans currently has a project to upgrade this segment to an eight-lane freeway basically following the 40th Street alignment through the Mid-City community of the City of San Diego. This is now open to traffic. From Landis Street to Adams Avenue, the freeway will generally be located between 40th Street and Central Avenue/Terrace Drive about 25 feet below ground. All but three city streets - Polk and Monroe avenues, and Landis Street - crossing 40th Street will stay open. Bridges will be constructed at Wightman Street, Univeristy Avenue, Orange Avenue, El Cajon Boulevard and Meade Avenue. Traffic will be able to get on and off the freeway within this segment of Route 15 through interchanges at University Avenue, El Cajon Boulevard and Adams Avenue. One city block of the freeway, between Polk and Orange avenues, will be covered with a community park. Pedestrian bridges will be provided at Monroe Avenue and near Landis Street. Pedestrians along Polk Street may cross through the park on the block of freeway cover.

    Route 15 cannot be currently (2/2001) signed as Interstate 15 because Route 15 is still not Interstate-standard between Route 94 and I-5, especially near Market Street. There are some on/off ramps that do not have adequate deceleration/acceleration lanes. This is currently being reconstructed. Additionally, work is planned to upgrade the SR-15/94 interchange. Note that Route 15/40th Street Fwy was not funded using conventional Interstate Highway funding.

    Naming The portion of Route 15 between I-805 and I-8 is named "Escondido Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission in 1957.

    The segment between Route 5 and Route 805 is named "Wabash" (with no further qualifier, such as "freeway"). It was named by location.

    The section of this route betwen the Home Avenue exit and the Ocean View Boulevard exit is named the "Archie Moore Memorial Freeway". Archie Moore was a legendary boxer whose outstanding career endured through four decades and a record 143 knockouts and who won the light-heavyweight championship when he was nearly 39 years old. After winning his title, he defined it nine times. He served as a trainer in the 1976 Olympics in Montreal and was elected to the Boxing Hall of Fame. He served in the Dept. of Housing and Urban Development during the Reagan administration. He lived in a home on E street in San Diego where he operated a restaurant known as Archie Moore's Chicken Shack. He also ran the "Any Boy Can" program that taught at-risk youth how to box, and about competition, sportsmanship, self-reliance, self-discipline, confidence, and courage. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 90, Chapter 141, on September 27, 1999.


  2. From Route 8 to the Nevada state line near Stateline, Nevada via the vicinity of Temecula, Corona, Ontario, Victorville, and Barstow.
    Suffixed Routings This route has a complicated numbering history, described below. The original (1947) plan was to have I-15 terminate at I-10, using the present-day I-215 alignment. US 395 would then continue to San Diego. In 1965, the US 395 segment was renumbered as TEMP I-15/US 395. In 1969, this corridor became I-215, and a new western alignment was created for I-15 that used existing Route 71 between US 395 and Route 91, and a new alignment (approximating former Route 31 in portions) between Route 91 and Devore. "I-215" and I-15 rejoined near Temecula. In 1974, I-215 was resigned as I-15E (with a real route number of Route 194), with the expressway portion signed as TEMP I-15E. In 1983, the I-15E signage was changed back to I-215; Route 194 was deleted, and Route 215 was created as non-chargable interstate.
    Post 1964 Signage History On July 1, 1964 a new routing for Route 15 was defined that began at Route 10 (I-10) in San Bernardino and continued to the Nevada State Line. In 1969, the portion of former US 395 from the I-5/US 395 (present-day I-5/Route 163) junction to I-10 in San Bernardino were transferred to Route 15. In 1974, this was rerouted to pass near Corona instead of San Bernardino. The portion of Route 15 from Route 71 (present-day I-15) near Temecula to Route 31 (present-day I-15) near Devore was transferred to Route 194, which was renumbered as Route 215 in 1982. The portion of Route 71 from Route 15 (present-day I-215) to Route 91 and former Route 31, from Route 15 (present-day I-215) to Route 91, was transferred to Route 15.
    Pre 1964 Signage History State Shield US Highway Shield Before the 1974 renumbering (yes, 1974!), everything is all confused. The routing can be broken up into the following segments:
    1. Pre-1969 Route 15 between I-8 in San Diego and a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station: The former route of US 395 was present-day Route 163; LRN 77 defined in 1931.
    2. Post-1969 Route 15 between I-8 in San Diego and a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station: This is I-15, and was LRN 283, defined in 1959.
    3. 1969 Route 15 from a point just S of the Mirimar Naval Air Station and 2 mi N of Temecula: The route was originally signed as Route 71, it was resigned as US 395 in 1939, and was LRN 77 (defined in 1931).
    4. 1969 Route 15 between 2 mi N of Temecula and Riverside: The route was signed as US 395, and was LRN 78 (defined in 1931). This is now I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.
    5. 1969 Route 15 through Riverside (between jct US 60/US 91 and jct US 60/US 395): The route was cosigned as US 60/US 395, and was LRN 19 (defined in 1909). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.
    6. 1969 Route 15 between Riverside and San Bernardino: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 395, and was LRN 43 (defined in 1931). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.
    7. 1969 Route 15 between San Bernardino and Devore: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66/US 395, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). This is currently I-215, although for a time it was signed as I-15E. This was part of Route 194 between 1974 and 1982.
    8. 1974 Route 15 between 2 mi N of Temecula and Corona: The route was signed as Route 71, and was LRN 77 (defined in 1931).
    9. 1974 Route 15 between Corona and Ontario: The route was unsigned in 1963 but was LRN 193 (defined in 1933). It was signed as Route 31 between 1964 and 1974. Between 1974 and the construction of the I-15 freeway, it was signed as Temporary I-15.
    10. 1974 Route 15 between Ontario and Devore: This route was unconstructed, but was LRN 193 (defined in 1935) and (for a portion) LRN 30 (defined in 1915; the routes were duplicated).
    11. Between Devore and 7 mi SW of Victorville: The route was cosigned as US 66/US 91/US 395, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). US 395 (LRN 145) diverged and headed N at this point. Note that a portion of the pre-freeway expressway version of this route over Cajon Pass proper is still partially there but has been regraded and used for SB I-15. From Cleghorn to I-215, there is a lasting and paved segment of the 1951-52 expressway. Only one side is used to reduce costs on maintenance. It isn't always the same side though as there are a couple of crossovers along the route.
    12. Between 7 mi SW of Victorville and Barstow: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 66, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1915). At Barstow, US 66 (LRN 58) diverged and headed E.
    13. Between Barstow and the Nevada state line: The route was cosigned as US 91/US 466, and was LRN 31 (defined in 1925).
    Business Routes Norco: Hammer Avenue (some portions are former Route 31)
    Status Portions of this route are currently undergoing a Nevada Dept. of Transportation (NDOT) funded widening. There is also a CalTrans project to add a southbound truck climbing lane at two locations in San Bernardino County. (CTC January 2001 Agenda, item 2.1c.(1) item 60)
    Naming The portion of I-15 from the northern I-215 junction to the Nevada state line is also named the "Mojave Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 47, Chapter 117, in 1987. Prior to the 1987 definition, this segment was named the "Barstow" Freeway (State Highway Commission, 1958).

    The portion of this route from Barstow to the Nevada state line (i.e., former US 91/466) was once named the "Barstow-Jean Highway" (Resolution Chapter 369, 1925).

    This portion of this route from I-40 to the northern I-15/I-215 junction is part of "Historic Highway Route 66", designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 6, Chapter 52, in 1991.

    Route 15 from Limonite Avenue exit to the the northerly I-15/I-215 junction is named the "Ontario Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 10, Chapter 136, in 1989.

    The northbound and southbound portions of Route 15, between Kenwood Avenue and Sierra Avenue, San Bernardino County, are named the "CHP Officer Reuben F. Rios, Sr., Memorial Freeway". California Highway Patrol Officer Reuben F. Rios, Sr. died while protecting and serving the people of California on October 26, 1996. He was directing traffic departing the Blockbuster Pavillion, a concert venue in Glen Helen by Route 15, when an intoxicated motorist accelerated for a lane change and struck Officer Rios. He was thrown onto the hood of the vehicle, then into the windshield, and fell to the pavement with major head trauma and internal injuries. Fellow officers immediately rushed to Officer Rios' aid and he was transported by ambulance to the hospital, but was pronounced dead upon his arrival. The person responsible for Officer Rios' death, was arrested, sentenced, and convicted of vehicular manslaughter with gross negligence supported by previous drunk driving convictions. Officer Reuben F. Rios, Sr. had been named Officer of the Year in 1996, and had been honored by the Latino Peace Officers Association, the San Bernardino Chamber of Commerce, the VFW, and others. His son, Reuben, Jr., graduated from the CHP Academy in April 1998. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 110, Chapter 93, July 12, 2000.

    Unofficially, Route 15 from Route 60 to the northern I-15/I-215 junction is named the "Devore Freeway".

    Between Route 91 and the southerly I-15/I-215 junction, I-15 is named the "Corona Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission in 1958, and follows former LRN 77.

    The segment of Route 15 from the San Diego County Line to Bundy Canyon Road near Lake Elsinore is named the "Temecula Valley Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 125, Chapter 78, in 1990. This naming supersedes portions of the Escondido and Coronado Freeways.

    The segment of this route between I-805 and Route 91 is officially named the "Escondido" Freeway. The segment between I-805 and Route 91 was named by the State Highway Commission in 1957. The segment between I-8 and Route 215 also received this name officially from Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 34, Chapter 67, in 1979.

    In San Diego County, I-15 is called the "Cabrillo" Freeway (until the junction with Route 163, which continues as the Cabrillo freeway).

    The section of I-15 between Route 78 and the City of Temecula is designated the "Avocado" Highway. This is in recognition of the fact that nearly 50 percent of the avocados consumed in the US are grown in San Diego County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 9, Chapter 62, in 1997.

    Named Structures Bridge 57-106, the Penasquitos Creek Bridge is officially named the "Knott Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1964, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 13, Chapter 75, in 1995.

    Bridge 57-870, at the W. Lilac Road overcrossing in San Diego county, is named the "Walter F. Maxwell Memorial Bridge". It was built in 1978, and was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 14, Chapter 68, in 1981.

    Bridge 57-919, in San Diego county at Claremont Mesa Blvd., is named the "Richard T. Silberman Bridge". It was built in 1985, and named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 67, Chapter 107, in 1987.

    Bridge 54-909, the I-15/I-10 separation in San Bernadino county near Ontario, is named the "Daniel D. Mikesell Interchange". It was built in 1975, and was named in Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 84, in 1980.

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas and Scenic Overlooks:

    • Clyde V. Kane (Midway), in San Bernardino County, 30 mi E of Barstow.
    • Valley Wells, in San Bernardino County, 26 mi W of the Nevada State Line.
    National Trails Arrowhead Trail Sign The portion of this route from the northern I-15/I-215 junction to the Nevada state line (former US 91) is part of the "Arrowhead Trail (Ocean to Ocean Trail)". It was named by Resolution Chapter 369 in 1925.

    National Old Trails Road Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-15 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "National Old Trails Road".

    New Santa Fe Trail Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-15 (i.e., old US 66) was part of the "New Santa Fe Trail".

    National Park to Park Highway Sign Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway Sign The original surface routing replaced by I-15 (i.e., old US 66) appears to have been part of the "National Park to Park Highway", and the "Pikes Peak Ocean to Ocean Highway".

    All of original US 395 (i.e., the portion of I-15 from US 395 to the northern I-15/I-215 junction, and the portion of I-15 from the southern I-15/I-215 junction to Route 163) was part of the "Three Flags Highway".

    Business Routes
    • Escondido: Centre City Parkway. This is marked at the connection with Route 78.
    • Lake Elsinore: Main Street, but poorly signed. This is old Route 71.
    • Victorville: Seventh Street, D Street (Route 18), Historic US 66.
    • Barstow: Main Street, Historic US 66.
    • Baker: Old US 91.
    Commuter Lanes There is a 2-land reversable HOV lane, about 7.5 miles, between the Route 163 interchange and North City Parkway. These lanes opened in October 1988, require two or more occupants, and operate 6:00am-9:00am (SB), 3:00pm-6:30pm (NB).

    This HOV lane is subject to an experimental program defined by Senate Bill 252, Chapter 481, on 9/27/1999. This program allows fee-based travel of the HOV lane by single-occupant vehicles during peak periods as long as a predefined level of service is maintained.

    HOV lanes are planned as follows:

    • From 1.6 mi S of Carmel Mountain Road to N Co. Fair overcrossing. Construction starts after 2000.
    • From Route 163 to I-105. Planned to open in 2011.
    • From Route 94 to I-805. Planned to open in 2011.
    • From I-10 to 0.6 mi S of Devore Road. Construction starts in November 1997.
    • From 0.6 mi S of Devore Road to Route 215. Construction starts in September 1999.
    • From Route 215 to US 395. Construction starts in August 2000.
    • From US 395 to Route 18. Construction starts in February 1999.

    Assembly Bill 713, Chapter 962 in 1993 authorized congestion pricing for the lanes in San Diego County, allowing the lanes to be used as toll lanes for single-passenger vehicles.

    Scenic Highway [SHC 263.3] From Route 76 near the San Luis Rey River to Route 91 near Corona; and from Route 138 near Cajon Pass to Route 138 near Cajon Pass; and from Route 58 near Barstow to Route 127 near Baker.
    Interstate Submissions The portion from Route 10 to the Nevada State line was approved as chargeable Interstate on 7/7/1947; Route 8 to Route 10 was approved as chargeable interstate in December 1968 using the Route 215 routing; this was changed to a western routing in February 1972, and there was a correction around Lake Elsinore in July 1978.
Overall statistics for Route 15:
  • Total Length (1995): 294 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1993): 8,500 to 227,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 184; Sm. Urban 31; Urbanized: 79.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAI: 288 mi; FAP: 6 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 294 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino.
Pre 1964 Signage History Pre-1964 State Shield Between the initial assignment of state signed routes in 1934 and the July 1, 1964 renumbering, what is now I-710 was signed as Route 15, and was LRN 167 (defined in 1933 and extended in 1947). Until the construction of the freeway, Route 15 ran between Pacific Coast Highway and US 99 along Atlantic Blvd. In 1964, the freeway routing was renumbered as Route 7, and was later renumbered as Route 710 and I-710. See Route 710 and Route 7 for additional details.
Other WWW Links
Freeway [SHC 253.1] Entire route. Defined as part of the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.
Interregional Route [SHC 164.11] Entire route.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 15 ran from LRN 56 near Fort Bragg to LRN 37 near Emigrant Gap via Willits, Williams, and Colusa. It had the following segments, all signed as Route 20 (and are still signed as Route 20):
  1. from Route 1 (LRN 56) near Fort Bragg to US 101 near Willits (LRN 1). This segment was defined in 1953.
  2. from US 101 (LRN 1) near Calpella to Route 45 (LRN 88) near Colusa, passing through Upper Lakes (jct Route 29 (LRN 89)), Clearlake (jct Route 53 (LRN 49)), a jct with Route 16 (LRN 50), and Williams (jct US 99W (LRN 7)). The portion between Williams and Colusa was defined in 1909. The reminder of this segment was defined in 1919.
  3. from Route 45 (LRN 88) 4 mi S of Colusa through Yuba City, Marysville, and Grass Valley to join up with US 50 (LRN 37) near Emigrant Gap. This segment was defined in 1919.


State Shield

State Route 16



Routing
  1. From Route 20 to Route 5 near Woodland via Rumsey and Woodland.
    Pre 1964 Signage History Before 1964, this segment was still signed as Route 16, but was LRN 50 (defined as part of the state highway system in 1933). It ran between Route 20 (LRN 15) and US 99W (LRN 7). Circa 1935, Route 16 was under construction between Route 20 and Rumsey.
    Naming The portion of this route from Route 20 to Rumsey was named the "Yolo and Lake Highway" by Resolution Chapter 283 in 1915.
    Scenic Highway [SHC 263.3] From Route 20 to Capay.
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] From Route 505 to Route 5 near Woodland. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

  2. From Route 50 near Perkins to Route 49 near Drytown.
    Post 1964 Signage History In 1984, a former version of (2) was deleted. That routing was from Route 5 near Woodland to Sacramento. This was Level Road and Sacramento Avenue, and ran past the Yolo County offices. That segment was still LRN 50 (defined in 1919), and continued into downtown Sacramento.
    Pre 1964 Signage History Pre-1964 State Shield In downtown Sacramento, Route 16 (LRN 50) came in around I Street, and then down 3rd/5th Streets to N Street. It ran across N Street to 15th Street signed as Route 16. Route 16 continued along Capitol Avenue as LRN 11, joining US 50 at 29th/30th Street. It continued as LRN 11, signed as US 50, along Folsom Blvd to Perkins, where it diverged from US 50.

    State Shield At this point, the current routing resumed. It was signed as Route 16, but was LRN 54, between the junction with US 50 (LRN 11) and Route 49 (LRN 65) near Drytown. LRN 54 was defined in 1933.

    Other WWW Links
    Freeway [SHC 253.2] From Route 50 near Perkins to Route 49 near Drytown. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.
    Interregional Route [SHC 164.11] Between the east urban limits of Sacramento and Route 49.
Overall statistics for Route 16:
  • Total Length (1995): 82 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 740 to 48,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 76; Sm. Urban 1; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 82 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 20 mi; Minor Arterial: 62 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Colusa, Yolo, Sacramento, Amador.
Pre 1964 Signage History Route 16 was numbered as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934.
Pre-1964 Legislative Route Before the 1964 signed/legislative route alignment, LRN 16 ran from LRN 1 (US 101) to LRN 89 (Route 29) near Lakeport. This segment was unsigned in 1963; it is presently signed as Route 175.


Back Arrow
Highways 1-8
State Highway Routes
Return to State Highway Routes
Forward Arrow
Highways 17-24
© 1996-2001 Daniel P. Faigin.
Maintained by: Daniel P. Faigin webmaster@cahighways.org.