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Jul. 1, 2001
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Road Rash: Jailbreak 3 stars
Road Rash revs up
with Jailbreak

Road Rash: Jailbreak
Road Rash: Jailbreak
publisher
Electronic Arts
ages
Teen
requirements
Sony PlayStation
difficulty
Medium
rating
3 stars
(out of 4)
screenshots
Click for larger image

Click for larger image

Click for larger image

related sites
Official Site
www.roadrash.com
BY JUSTIN BRAXTON-BROWN
Enquirer Contributor

With new bikes, missions and characters, Road Rash: Jailbreak leaves older Road Rash games in the dust.

Road Rash: Jailbreak is very similar to its older siblings in the Road Rash series: You still race motorbikes at high speeds through residential areas, avoiding police officers and assaulting other racers.

This version of Road Rash has a much different story line from the others. In Jailbreak you are moving up through the ranks of a biker gang. You do this by winning races and completing preset challenges. the ultimate goal of the game is to save your buddy, Spaz, from the long arm of the law.

Jailbreak has many new modes of game play including the ‘‘Five-O’’ challenge where you become the police officer and set out to bust Road Rash competitors. Another new mode of play is the cooperative side-car race in which, you guessed it, Player One drives the motorcycle while Player Two rides in the side-car assaulting any racers that attempt to get the lead. The coolest new head-to-head mode is aptly titled, ‘‘Cops and Robbers.’’

In this mode, one player is the cop and the other is the robber. Players battle it out to see if motorcycle speedsters can outrun the fuzz.

There are more than 80 miles of road stretched over 100 different race courses. The game includes 15 new bikes and six side-cars for players and is compatible with Dual Shock controllers for a realistic motorcycle feel. Jailbreak is also compatible with four-way adapters to increase competitions among gamers.

What makes this game different from past Road Rash games?

The first difference is the change in graphics. Game designers have put much more into the graphics of Jailbreak. Unlike the older versions, the motorcycles in Jailbreak look much more like real motorcycles.

The competitions in this game are much more defined. The racers actually look different from one another. It is easy to spot your suspect when in ‘‘Five-O’’ mode because each person retains a certain amount of individuality.

Another huge difference in this game is the easy controls. In past versions, once you lost control you spent the next several minutes trying to get your bike steady again. This often resulted in a crash, which, in turn, lead to frustration.

In Jailbreak, the bikes are easy to steer and, with the exception of running into stationary objects, very hard to crash. Players can race faster and make more money by finishing better in the race. More money means more fun.

The biggest draw to Road Rash is still very prevalent in Jailbreak. There are more than 45 new combat moves for riders to perform on their assailants. Players start out with different weapons, and, as in preceding Road Rash games, every weapon can be stolen, even the police officer’s billy club. Attacking your opponent is rewarded with a combat bonus. The more you kick and punch the more money you get.

But remember, if you irritate the wrong racer, chances are he will fight back, and there is always a lurking police officer waiting for the wrong person to fall off his bike.


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Jul. 1, 2001
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