Glossary of Common Adult System Terms


Source: Sourcebook of Texas Adult Justice Population Statistics, Criminal Justice Policy Council, November 1999
 
 

Active Parole Supervision: a supervision status under which the offender is assigned to a caseload that reports directly to a parole officer (see Parole / Mandatory Supervision Population).

Admissions to Prison: offenders physically processed through diagnostic facilities and admitted into state Institutional Division (prison) facilities upon direct court sentences for convictions of new offenses, violations of terms of parole supervision, or a revocations of probated sentences.

Admissions to State Jail: offenders admitted into State Jail Division facilities for  convictions of State Jail felony offenses. Admissions may be in the form of direct sentences, up-front time as a condition of State Jail Probation supervision, State Jail Probation modifications, or State Jail Probation revocations (see State Jail Division).

Adult Arrests: arrests for individuals age 17 and above as reported by the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Adult Arrest Rate: the number of adult (age 17 and over) arrests per 100,000 adult population.

Aggravated Offenses: offenses defined under Article 42.12, Section 3g of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure.  These offenses currently include Capital Murder, 1st and 2nd Degree Murder, Aggravated Sexual Assault, Aggravated Kidnapping, Aggravated Robbery, Indecency with a Child (with Sexual Contact), Sexual Assault of a Child, and those offenses with an Affirmative Weapon Finding.

Bench Warrant: refers to a court order that detains an inmate in a county jail for court related reasons.  An example would be a prison inmate who has been ordered to appear before a court as a witness.

Blue Warrant (Pre-Revocation Warrant): an order issued by the Parole Division of the Department of Criminal Justice to detain an offender under parole or mandatory supervision pending an administrative hearing due to alleged violations by the offender of the terms and conditions of release.

Board of Pardons and Paroles: an eighteen member board appointed by the Governor to make decisions concerning Parole / Mandatory Supervision releases, revocations, and executive clemency.

Board of Pardons and Paroles Panel: a subgroup of the full Board (usually three members), that reviews offender files to determine if an offender will be released to parole/mandatory supervision prior to completion of the full sentence (see Parole Releases, Mandatory Supervision Releases, and Discretionary Mandatory Supervision Releases).

Boot Camps: highly structured, short-term prison treatment programs modeled after military basic training.  These programs emphasize physical exercise, strict supervision and discipline, and are typically designed for young, first-time offenders.

Calendar Time: a count of actual days served on a sentence.

Capacity: the number of beds available for use by the Department of Criminal Justice.

Community Justice Assistance Division (CJAD): the division of the Department of Criminal Justice that provides funding, develops standards, and has general oversight over Community Supervision and Corrections Departments within the state.

Community Supervision: refers to the court ordered placement of a defendant to a continuum of programs and sanctions in the community, with conditions imposed by the court for a specified time period, upon suspension of their sentence (commonly referred to as probation).

Community Supervision and Corrections Department (CSCD): local government level departments that supervise and help rehabilitate offenders who are sentenced to community supervision by local courts.  There are 122 departments in Texas, organized within judicial districts and serving 254 counties (commonly referred to as probation departments).

Contract Inmates in County Jails: federal, out of state, other county and Department of Criminal Justice inmates who are serving their sentence in county jails under contract with the local county government.

County Jails: incarceration facilities operated by county governments.  Parole/mandatory supervision revocations, felony probation revocations, and newly convicted felony offenders sentenced to prison or State Jail are housed in county jails awaiting transfer to prison or State Jail.

Court Residential Treatment Centers (CRTC): community corrections facilities operated by Community Supervision Corrections Departments where services and treatment are provided to offenders for substance abuse, alcohol dependency, and in some instances, mental deficiencies or emotional/family problems.

Crime Rate: the number of Index Crimes reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation per 100,000 of the total state population (see Index Crimes).

Deferred Adjudication: a postponement of entering a finding of guilt, where the offender undergoes a term of community supervision that, if completed successfully, will prevent a final conviction from appearing on the offender’s record.

Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ): the state agency that oversees the adult criminal justice system. The major divisions are the Institutional Division (Prison), State Jail Division, Parole Division, and Criminal Justice Assistance Division.

Direct Court Sentences to Prison: offenders who are ordered by the courts to serve time in prison who were not under probation or parole/mandatory supervision at the time of conviction (see New Felony Convictions).

Direct Probation Supervision: offenders who are on community supervision and who work and/or reside in the jurisdiction in which they are being supervised and maintain a minimum of one face-to-face contact with a community supervision officer every three months.

Direct Sentence to State Jail: offenders who are ordered by the courts to serve time in a State Jail facility who are not required to receive post-release supervision (probation).

Discharge: offenders who are released from prison or a State Jail facility either by full expiration of their sentence or by court order.

Discretionary Mandatory Supervision (DMS) Releases: offenders with offenses committed on or after September 1, 1996 who are released from prison under Mandatory Supervision contingent upon approval by a Board of Pardons and Paroles panel vote (see Mandatory Supervision Releases).

Federal Inmate: an inmate housed in county jails on a contractual basis between the county and the federal penal system.

Felons Sent to County Jail: offenders convicted of a felony offense who are given county jail time for their term of incarceration (under Section 12.44(a), Texas Penal Code).

Felony Case Conviction: a felony case disposed with a guilty verdict by a criminal court as reported by the Office of Court Administration.

Fiscal Year: the Texas fiscal year begins on September 1st and ends on August 31st.

Good Conduct Time: days credited towards completion of a sentence based upon the behavior of an offender.

Halfway House: a residential facility with focus on reintegration of offenders back into the community after a period of incarceration.

In-Prison Therapeutic Community (IPTC): a nine-month intensive substance abuse treatment program for offenders incarcerated in prison.

Incarceration Rate: offenders incarcerated in state facilities per 100,000 of the total state population.

Index Crimes: a set of crimes defined by the Uniform Crime Report (UCR) program of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) as a benchmark in the study of crime trends. They are composed of Violent Index Crimes (Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter, Rape, Robbery, and Aggravated Assault) and Property Index Crimes (Burglary, Larceny-Theft, and Motor Vehicle Theft).

Indirect Probation Supervision: offenders who have been placed on community supervision, but do not report to an officer directly because: they have transferred out of their original Community Supervision Corrections Department (CSCD) or county to another state, another CSCD or county; they report by mail; they have absconded; or they are incarcerated in county jail, prison, or State Jail (and they have a term of community supervision to complete upon release from incarceration).

Institutional Division (ID): the division of the Department of Criminal Justice that houses offenders with Capital, 1st, 2nd and/or 3rd degree felony convictions. The Institutional Division is commonly referred to as prison.

Intensive Supervision: a special condition of Parole or Mandatory Supervision where high-risk/high-needs offenders are under stricter surveillance, a more stringent supervision structure, and more intensive participation than the requirements under regular Parole or Mandatory Supervision.

Intermediate Sanction Facilities (ISF): short-term (up to 90 days) incarceration facilities used by the Board of Pardons and Paroles in lieu of revocation for offenders who have been found to have violated the terms or conditions of parole/mandatory supervision release.

Local Inmates in County Jails: inmates housed in county jails who are under the original jurisdiction of that county.

Mandatory Supervision (MS) Releases: offenders who are released from prison when their Calendar Time plus Good Conduct Time earned equals their total sentence. Violent offenders who committed their offense on or after September 1, 1988 are not eligible for thios mode of release.  Non-violent offenders who committed offenses on or after September 1, 1996 are eligible for Discretionary Mandatory Supervision (see Discretionary Mandatory Supervision Release).

Mandatory Supervision Revocation: an admission classification for offenders returned to prison after a Board of Pardons and Paroles panel has terminated their mandatory supervision due to a conviction for a new offense or for violations of the terms and conditions of their release.

Misdemeanor Probation: community supervision for offenders convicted of an A or B misdemeanor.

New Felony Conviction: an offender convicted for an offense who, at the time of conviction, was not under felony probation, parole, or mandatory supervision.

Non-Aggravated Sex Offenses: sex offenses such as Incest and Indecency by Exposure not listed under Article 42.12, Section 3g of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure.

Non-Violent Offenses: non-personal property and drug offenses.

Other Inmates in County Jails: inmates such as child support violators, court witnesses, offenders in civil contempt of court, and out of state offenders being held by the county.

Paper Ready: inmates held in county jail facilities awaiting transfer to prison who are ready for transfer, with all necessary paperwork completed.  State law requires that inmates be transferred to prison within 45 days of being “Paper Ready.”

Parole Approvals: parole approvals granted by the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

Parole Approval Rate: the percentage of parole approvals out of the number of cases considered for parole.

Parole/MS Cases Under Jurisdiction: all cases under active Parole / Mandatory Supervision plus: those reporting annually, cases supervised out of state, declared absconders, cases released to detainer, and out-of-country conditional pardons.

Parole Considerations: cases reviewed for parole by the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

Parole Division: the division of the Department of Criminal Justice that supervises offenders released from prison on Parole or Mandatory Supervision Release.

Parole-in-Absentia (PIA): offenders released to parole or mandatory supervision from either county jails, out of state facilities, or in federal penal institutions.

Parole/MS Population: offenders actively supervised by the Parole Division after their Parole or Mandatory Supervision Release from prison.

Parole Releases: offenders who are released from prison under the conditions of parole to the supervision of the Parole Division. Parole Release is contingent upon approval by a Board of Pardons and Paroles panel. Currently, offenders are considered for parole when their Calendar Time served plus Good Conduct Time earned equals one-fourth of their total sentence if the offense for which they are serving is not aggravated. If the offense was aggravated, offenders are considered when their Calendar Time served equals fifty percent of their total sentence.

Parole Revocations: an admission classification for offenders returned to prison after a Board of Pardons and Paroles panel has terminated their parole due to a conviction for a new offense or for violations of the terms and conditions of their release (see White Warrant).

Parole Violators with a New Charge: parole/mandatory supervision offenders held in county jails awaiting trial or serving time for new criminal offenses.

Prison: see Institutional Division.

Pre-Parole Transfer (PPT): community-based residential facilities that house offenders who are within one year of their approved parole or mandatory supervision release date.

Pretrial Offenders: offenders charged with a felony being held in county jail facilities awaiting adjudication.

Probation Placements: offenders who are sentenced to community supervision. Offenders are placed on Misdemeanor, State Jail, or Regular Felony Probation.

Probation Revocations: an admissions classification for offenders sentenced to either prison or State Jail after their probation was terminated due to a conviction for a new offense or for violations of the terms and conditions of their probation.

Recidivism Rate: the percentage of offenders released from prison or an alternative to incarceration program who are reincarcerated after a specified period of time.

Regular Felony Probation Supervision: supervision for felony offenders who have been found guilty or whose adjudication of guilt has been deferred (see deferred adjudications). These offenders are given probated sentences in lieu of sentences to prison.  If revoked, these offenders will be sentenced to prison.  Regular felony probation supervision includes those placed on felony probation by the courts, deferred adjudications, those returned from Felony Shock Incarceration, and those returned from State Boot Camp.

Restitution Facilities: community-based corrections facilities operated by Community Supervision Corrections Departments in which offenders on community supervision participate in activities designed to assist the offender in paying back individual victims of crime and society as a whole.  These facilities provide twenty-four hour supervision and a highly structured environment for nonviolent felony offenders.  Offenders are confined to the center except to go to their place of employment, to perform community service work, or to attend education or rehabilitation programs.  The facilities target offenders who have problems holding jobs or paying court-ordered fees, and who do not have serious substance abuse problems.

Sentences to Prison: offenders ordered by the court to serve a term of incarceration as a result of a direct court sentence, parole/mandatory supervision revocation, or probation revocation.

Shock Probation:  community supervision sentence that allows judges to order the release of offenders who have served no more than one hundred and eighty days in prison.  These offenders then serve the remainder of their sentence on Regular Felony Probation.

State Jail Division: the division of the Department of Criminal Justice that houses offenders convicted of State Jail felony offenses.  An individual adjudged guilty of a State Jail felony offense may be confined in a State Jail facility for a term of no more than two years nor less than 75 days. There is no parole or mandatory supervision release from State Jail.

State Jail Facility: a state funded incarceration facility that houses offenders convicted of a State Jail Felony offense.

State Jail Felony Offenses: consist mainly of lower level assault, property, drug, and family offenses.

State Jail Felons Sentenced to County Jail: offenders convicted of State Jail felony offenses who have been sentenced to county jail instead of a State Jail facility.

State Jail Felons Sentenced to State Jail: offenders convicted of State Jail felony offenses who have been sentenced to a State Jail facility.

State Jail Probation: community supervision for offenders convicted of a State Jail felony offense. These offenders are given a probated sentence in lieu of a commitment to a county jail or a State Jail facility.  If revoked, these offenders will be sentenced to a State Jail facility.

Substance Abuse Felony Punishment (SAFP): an alternative to incarceration program operated by the state where offenders are sentenced to nine months of confinement and intensive treatment in a substance abuse treatment facility. Offenders on probation and parole or mandatory supervision are eligible to participate in this program.

Substance Abuse Treatment Facility (SATF): residential, community corrections program that provides 24-hour supervision and specifically treats offenders who engage in chemical abuse.

Up-Front Time: a sentence to a State Jail facility not to exceed 180 days as a condition of State Jail Probation. After release from State Jail, the offender is placed under State Jail Probation supervision.

White Warrant (Revocation Warrant): a warrant issued by the Parole Division revoking an offender’s Parole / Mandatory Supervision.
 
 

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