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Novel / Roman (1926) by Thea von Harbou

Thea von Harbou

The initial scenario for Metropolis was most likely developed by Thea von Harbou and Fritz Lang sometime during the latter half of 1923, when von Harbou was nearing the end of her work on Lang's Die Nibelungen. By the early part of 1924 the script was taking shape, and during a brief Austrian holiday in June of 1924 (refer Chronology) the public was informed of the couple's new project. As a result of Lang's subsequent visit to America in October of that year, the director clarified the visual aspects of his proposed film and assisted his wife develop the scenario further. The actual script was then refined and adapted by the pair throughout 1925-6, as filming took place. It is unclear as to precisely when Thea von Harbou completed the manuscript for the novel, however it was published in Berlin at the end of 1926 by A. Scherl, in an edition of 273 pages with dustjacket art by Walter Reimann. Signed copies of the book were available for the film's premiere at the Ufa-Palast, Berlin, on 10 January 1927. An English-language version appeared shortly thereafter, under the imprint of the Readers Library Publishing Company. This small, 250 page book was a cheap publication, utilising pulp paper, and sold in department stores. It was part of a series which also included Spies and Woman in the Moon. The dustjacket art for Metropolis was by Aubrey Hammond. Bibliographic details of these initial German and English editions, plus subsequent editions published in a variety of languages, are listed below.

Thea von Harbou's original novel varies somewhat from the film as shot by Fritz Lang during 1925-6. This version was initially presented to the German public on 10 January 1927. However, the subsequent savage editing by an American team under Channing Pollock detroyed Lang's original film and gave rise to substantial departures from the scenario as presented in the novel. It is obvious from a reading of Thea von Harbou's 1926 text, that the novel was meant to complement the movie and expand upon ideas and concepts presented therein. As a result of the deletion of the Hel sub-plot from the film - a strand which explained the erratic and strange behaviour of Rotwang - all versions of the movie which appeared outside of germany after March 1927, and even within Germany after August 1927, were left with a flawed, often incomprehensible plot. The heart and soul had been taken out of the film, and what was left was primarily visual spectacle. The need for Thea von Harbou's book to explain the film was all the more necessary as a result of the cuts and re-editing of Fritz Lang's original three hour plus director's cut.

Thea von Harbou's novelisation of Metropolis comprises 25 chapters. They are summarised as follows, along with notes describing variations between novel and film:

Chapter

Summary

Film Images / Notes

1

Opening scene: Freder Fredersen in his room, playing his organ and thinking back to recent experiences in the Club of Sons wherby he encountered a young woman (Maria) and a group of workers children. After they leave, Freder asks the Majordomo where they came from, but he does not know. We return to Freder in his room - he is interrupted by Slim, a minder, whom he dismisses. Freder then goes on to think in general about Metropolis, the city, the machines, the workers, the monk Desertus and the Gothics, and his father, Joh Fredersen, the master of Metropolis.

The scene in Freder's room is not included in film, nor is the early encounter with Slim. The sub-text of the monk Desertus and the Gothics is similarly deleted (underplayed) in the film. The meeting is included.

2

Joh Fredersen is in his office, dictating to his secretaries. Freder enters and observes Joh dismissing Josaphat over a trivial matter. Joh and Freder have a discussion over this, and Joh asks his son why he came via the hall of the machines. They talk about the workers and possible machine-men of the future. After Freder leaves, Joh asks Slim to keep a close eye on him.

Similar scenario to version in film, though Josaphat's dismissal comes earlier in the novel, and its rationale varies.

3

Freder encounters the sacked Josaphat - he tells him to go home and wait for him to come. Meanwhile, Slim begins his search for Freder as Freder goes down below to the Paternoster machine (it controls all the lifts in the New Tower of Babel building). Freder meets Georgy 11811 and replaces him at the machine. Freder subsequently finds some plans in his pockets. We are then told the story of what happens to Georgy after he leaves Freder - he gets into a taxi and heads off for Josaphat's, however upon seeing the bright lights of the city, and realising he has money in his pockets, he is bedazzled. He sees a beautiful woman in a car, then he goes on to the Yoshiwara nightclub.

Similar scenario to version in film, though Georgy's visit to Yoshiwara is no longer extant.

4

Rotwang's house and background on Rotwang. Joh arrives to speak to him, and whilst waiting for the scientist he discovers the monument to Hel, Joh's dead wife. Rotwang joins him and they discuss Hel and her new replacement - a robot (Futura). The robot enters the room. Later Joh and Rotwang talk about the mysterious plans of the catacombs and decide on a visit there. Joh returns to his office where Slim tells him that his son Freder is missing.

Similar scenario to version in film, though the novel does not describe the creation of the 'faceless' robot in any great detail.

5

Freder works on the Paternoster machine. At the end of the shift he goes with his fellow, exhausted workers to hear Maria preach and tell the story of Babel. Joh and Rotwang look on from above, and Joh asks Rotwang to put Maria's face on to the robot. Maria and Freder talk and agree to meet the following day in the cathedral. When Freder leaves, Maria is pursued and captured by Rotwang.

Similar scenario to version in film.

6

Yoshiwara - September tells Slim of Georgy's adventures and of the drug Maohee. Slim interrogates Georgy and obtains Josaphat's address from him.

Similar scenario to version in film, though the whole episode is no longer extant.

7

Freder arrives at Josaphat's - he asks where Georgy is, but he never arrived. Freder and Josaphat agree to help each other, then Freder leaves. Slim arrives at Josaphat's. He propositions Josaphat, they struggle, and he eventually convinces Josaphat to leave Metropolis straight away. They exit for the airport.

Similar scenario to version in film, though the whole episode is no longer extant.

8

Freder arrives at the cathedral looking for Maria. He encounters Desertus the monk, who speaks to him of impending doom. Freder leaves, and as he walks past Rotwang's house he hears Maria's screams. He enters the house and becomes trapped - subsequently hearing the voices of two different Marias. Rotwang enters the room where Maria is trapped and talks to her, before returning to the robot. Freder looks out the window and sees the robot (now in the form of Maria) leaving the house. Freder escapes and goes to Maria's house, but has no luck in locating her. He then goes to the New Tower of Babel where he finds the robot Maria in the arms of his father. Freder collapses and when he comes to, his father denies that Maria was ever there. Freder then collapses again and is put to bed to recover.

Similar scenario to version in film, though Freder does not visit Maria's house or hear the voices of two Maria's.

9

Josaphat leaves Metropolis on a plane. However during the trip he has second thoughts. He murders the pilot, bails out, and meets a farm girl. He then sleeps.

This episode was not included in the film.

10

Josaphat tries unsuccessfully to see Freder, who is sick in bed. Eventually he signals Freder and arrives at the room in worker's clothes. Josaphat tells Freder how he betrayed him by accepting Slim's offer. Freder then tells Josaphat of Maria and his dream / hallucination involving the 7 Deadly Sins, Death, and the scarlet woman called Babylon. He states that Death is about Metropolis.

Similar scenario to version in film, though parts are no longer extant and others are re-edited to confuse this section of the plot. Also, Josaphat is not in the room when Freder has his hallucinations.

11

Freder continues the story of his dream. Desertus also preaches a sermon about the woman Babylon. Freder asks Jan about the sermon. Freder and Josaphat leave Freder's room. Jan tells Freder about the evil Maria and the suicide of Marinus. Freder decides to return to the City of the Dead (the catacombs) to seek out Maria.

This scenario varies in the film version, and subsequent cutting and editing has further complicated the narrative.

12

Joh Fredersen talks to his mother - it is acrimonious as she speaks of his ill-treatment of Rotwang over Hel, and of continuing difficulties with Freder.

This episode was not included in film.

13

Rotwang talks to the trapped Maria in his house. He blames Joh for taking Hel from him and turning him evil. He tells Maria that he stole her soul and gave it to the robot, then sent her down below to preach discord. Rotwang tries to convince Maria to stay with him, and in return he will save the workers from the robot. Joh is listening to the conversation - he becomes enraged and attacks Rotwang, knocking him out.

Similar scenario to version in film, though the fight between Rotwang and Joh is no longer extant.

14

Evil Maria preaches to the workers in Maria's temple, stirring them up to revolution. Freder and Josaphat enter and denounce her. They are attacked and Georgy is killed trying to help them. Evil Maria and the mob leave to destroy the machines. Freder returns to the New Tower of Babel, looking for his father. The machines begin to overload.

Similar scenario to version in film, though Freder does not return to his father at this point.

15

Maria is still in Rotwang's house after the fight - she hears the Danger alarm in the city and escapes to investigate. The mob continue their destruction of the machines. Grot defends the Heart Machine, but Joh tells him to let the mob destroy it. Grot is attacked by the mob and Maria throws the switch to overload the Heart Machine.

Similar scenario to version in film.

16

Freder looks for his father in the New Tower of Babel. He then travels underground to find him. He reaches the machines and encounters his father, who tells him that he initiated the destruction of the machines so that his son (Freder) could save the city. Freder is shocked. The machines continue to break down.

This episode between Joh and Freder was not included in the film.

17

Maria notices water rising in the workers city. She locates some children and gets them to escape upwards. They find that they are trapped by a blocked doorway, with water rising around them.

Similar scenario to version in film, though doorway blockage scene is no longer extant.

18

Maria tells a story to the trapped children. Freder arrives to help her. He sees that the group is trapped and gets Grot to help. Grot initially does not want to help Maria, as she supposedly destroyed his machine, however Freder makes him do otherwise.

Varies from the final filmed version, as Josaphat, and not Grot, helps Freder and Maria with the rescue.

19

Freder and Maria and the children reach safety in the Club of the Sons. Freder goes off to find his father. Maria later leaves to see what is going on in the city - she heads towards the cathedral. The mob converges on the cathedral precinct and capture the Evil Maria. The real Maria sees these events and collapses near the cathedral.

Similar scenario to version in film.

20

Josaphat tells Freder about the capture of the Evil Maria by the mob. They go off by car to save her, thinking it is the good Maria who has been captured. Freder witnesses the Evil Maria being burnt on the pyre. He is attacked by the mob.

Similar scenario to version in film.

21

Rotwang wakes up in his house after the attack by Joh - he thinks he is dead and goes to the cathedral in a daze, looking for Hel. He believes Maria is Hel and chases her into the cathedral. Freder goes to help Maria.

Similar scenario to version in film, though parts referring to Hel are no longer extant.

22

Joh and Slim in Joh's office - Joh is concerned for his son. Josaphat enters the office and tells them of Freder's fate - they immediately rush off to the cathedral. Freder, Maria and Rotwang struggle on the cathedral roof - Rotwang falls (lets go) and dies.

Similar scenario to version in film, though Slim informs Joh of Freder's fate, not Josaphat.

23

Joh and Freder console an exhausted Maria in the cathedral. Freder thinks she is dying, but his father reassures him that she is not. Joh then leaves to visit his mother.

This episode not included in film version.

24

Freder and Maria in the cathedral - Maria recovering from her ordeal, asks Freder to be the mediator.

Similar scenario to version in film, in part only. No reconciliation between Joh and Grot is included in the novel. End of film.

25

Joh Fredersen visits his mother - they become reconciled. Mrs Fredersen passes on a letter from Hel.

This episode was not included in film version.

 

 

 


Metropolis (Novel) - Editions 1926-2000

Dustjacket for the 1926 Berlin edition of Thea von Harbou's novel Metropolis. Based on an original design by Walter Reimann.

1926

Metropolis, A. Scherl, Berlin, 1926, 273p. Original dustjacket image by Walter Reimann. German language.

Metropolis, A. Scherl, Berlin, 1926, 198p., 8 illustrations from film. Photonovel edition. German language. For copy of cover and still images see following link.

1927

Metropolis, The Readers Library Publishing Co., London, [1927], 250p. English translation of novelisation. Translator not identified. Original dustjacket image by Aubrey Hammond.

Metropolis, 'Illustrated with scenes from the motion picture', Hutchison, London, [1927-8], 250p. Photoplay edition - larger format than Readers Library edition. English translation of novelisation. Translator not identified. 19 x 13cm. Contains 4 stills from the movie.

1928

Metropolis, Gallimard, Paris, 1928, 96p. French translation of the novelisation of the film. Abbreviated.

Metropolis : geautoriseerde vertaling van Maurits J. Vles, met 8 foto's naar de film, Nederlands Vitgevers-Maatschap, Amsterdam, 1928, 208p. Dutch translation of the novelisation, with 8 photographs from the film.

1963

Metropolis, Ace Books, New York, 1963, 222p. Series - An Ace Science-Fiction Classic, F-246. Based on the 1927 English-language London edition. Preface by F.J. Ackermann.

1973

Metropolis, Ace Books, New York, [1973], 222p. Preface by F.J. Ackermann. Series - Science Fiction from the Great Years - 52831. Reprint of 1963 Ace edition, with a different cover.

1975

Metropolis, Gregg Press, Boston, 1975, xv, 250 p., [8] leaves of plates. Series - The Gregg Press Science Fiction Series. Reprint of the 1927 edition as published by the Readers Library Publishing Company, London.

1977

Metropolis, Martinez Roca, Barcelona, 1977, 188p. Series - Coleccion Super Ficcion, 16. Spanish language.

1978

Metropolis, Verlag Ullstein, Ungekurzte Ausg., Frankfurt am Main, 1978, 223p. First German reissue of the original 1926 novelisation of the film.

1984

Metropolis, Ozeanische Bibliothek, Frankfurt am Main, 1984, 204p. Forward by Herbert W. Franke. German language.

1985

Metropolis, Ediciones Orbis, Barcelona, 1985, 188p. Series - Biblioteca de ciencia ficcion, 23. Spanish language.

1988

Metropolis, Donning, Norfolk, 1988, 170p. Leather bound limited edition, and paperback edition. Illustrated by Michael Kaluta.

1989

Metropolis, Xanadu, London, 1989, 224p.


Thea von Harbou (1888-1954)
Chronological Bibliography

This following bibliography of published and filmed works by Thea von Harbou includes novels, short stories, and film scripts (the latter indicated in italics). It is arranged chronologically, and all titles are by Thea von Harbou unless otherwise noted. Reference should also be made to the Metropolis Bibliography for further items relating to von Harbou's role in the making of that film.

1888

{27 December - Thea von Harbou born at Tauperlitz.}

1910

Die nach uns Kommen (Those who came after us), Stuttgart, 1910. 1st edition. Novel.

1913

Der Krieg und die Frauen (War and Women), J.G. Cotta, Stuttgart, Berlin, 1913, 318p.

Von Engeln und Teufelchen, J.G. Cotta, Stuttgart und Berlin, 1913.

1914

Der Krieg und die Frauen (War and Women), J.G. Cotta, Stuttgart, Berlin, 1914, 318p. New edition.

Deutsche Frauen, Bilder stillen Heldentums (German Women: Portraits of Quiet Determinism), C.F. Amelang, Leipzig, 1914, 158p.

1915

Deutsche Frauen: Bilder stillen Heldentums, (German Women: Portraits of Quiet Determinism), C.F. Amelang, Leipzig, 1915, 158p. Reprint.

Die Masken des Todes: sieben geschichten in einer (The Masks of Death: 7 Stories in 1), Cotta, Stuttgart, Berlin, 1915, 264p.

Du junge Wacht am Rhein! Ein Kriegsbuch fur die deutsche Jugend (You Young Guardians of the Rhine! A War Book for German Youth), Levy & Muller, Stuttgart, 1915, 214p. Short stories for children.

Der unsterbliche Acker - ein Kriegsroman, J.G. Cott'sche Buchhandlung, Stuttgart, 1915, 230p.

1916

Aus Abend und Morgen ein neuer Tag; Erzählungen, E. Salzer, Heilbron, 1916, 108p.

Das Mondscheinprinzesschen, Stuttgart, 1916.

Die Flucht der Beate Hoyermann, J.B. Cotta, Stuttgart, and Globius, Berlin, 1916, 391p.

Die deutsche Frau im Weltkrieg: Einblicke und Ausblicke, Hesse & Becker, Leipzig, 1916, 143p. Series: Gerritsen women's history, no. 1173.

Der Krieg und die Frauen (War and Women), J.G. Cotta, Berlin, 1916, 318p. Novel.

Gold in Feuer, Stuttgart, 1916.

1917

Der Belagerte Tempel, Ullstein, Berlin, 1917, 250p. Novel.

Die Macht der zweiten Frau, ?, 1917.

1918

Aus Abend und Morgen ein neuer Tag; Erzählungen, E. Salzer, Heilbron, 1918, 108p.

Die nach uns kommen (Those who came after us), Cotta, Stuttgart; Berlin, 1918, 259p. 6 & 7th edition, novel.

Das indische Grabmal (The Indian Tomb), Ullstein, Berlin & Wien, 1918, 378p.

Adrian Drost und sein Land, Ullstein, Berlin, 8vo., 1918, 378p. Novel.

1919

Sonderbare Heilige, A. Scherl, Berlin, 1919, 231p. Novel.

Legenden, Ullstein, Berlin, 1919, 8to., 227p.

1920

Das Haus ohne Tür und Fenster, Ullstein, Berlin, 1920, 378p. Illustrated novel.

Die unheilige Dreifaltigkeit, E. Salzer, Heilbronn, 1920, 88p.

Die heilige Simplize / Die Legende von der heiligen Simplicia, Script for Joe May, 1920.

Das wandernde Bild / Wandernder Held (Wandering Image), Script for Fritz Lang, 1920.

1921

Das indische Grabmal (The Indian Tomb), Ullstein, Berlin, 1921, 254p. Illustrated.

Das indische Grabmal (The Indian Tomb), Script for Joe May, 1921.

Die frauen von Gnadenstein, Script for Dinesen, 1921.

Kämpfende Herzen / Die Vier um die Frau (Four Around a Woman), Script for Fritz Lang, 1921.

Der müde Tod (Between Two Worlds; Beyond the Wall; Destiny), Script for Fritz Lang, 1921.

Der Leidensweg der Inge Krafft, Script for Joe May, 1921.

1922

Der brennende Acker (The Burning Soil), Script for Friedrich Murnau, 1922.

Dr. Mabuse, der Spieler (Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler), Script for Fritz Lang, 1922.

Phantom, Script for Friedrich Murnau, 1922.

1923

Das Nibelungenbuch (The Nibelungen Book), Drei Masken Verlag, München, 1923, 8vo., 267p. Ist edition with 14 illustrations from the film; 2nd edition (1923-4) with 24 illustrations. Refer Fritz Lang's Nibelungen.

Die Nibelungen - Siegfrieds Tod, Script for Fritz Lang, 1923.

Die Nibelungen - Kriemhilds Rache, Script for Fritz Lang, 1923.

Die Austreibung (Driven from Home; The Expulsion), Script for Friedrich Murnau, 1923.

Die Prinzessin Suwarin, Script for Guter, 1923.

1924

Das Nibelungenbuch, Drei Masken Verlag, München 1924, 267p.

Das Nibelungenbuch, Drei Masken Verlag, München, 1924, 368p. 16.-30.Tausend.

Die Nibelungen. Ein deutsche Heldenlied, Ufa-Decla Film, Berlin, 1924, 24p. Illustrated.

Indeeschu kapenes, "Letas" apgahdiba, Riga, 1924, 214p. Lettish translation of Das indische Grabmal.

Die Finanzen des Grossherzogs (The Grand Duke's Finances), Script for Friedrich Murnau, 1924.

Michael, Script for Carl Dreyer, 1924.

1925

Metropolis, Script for Fritz Lang, 1925-6.

Zur Chronik von Grieshuus (At the Grey House), Script for Gerlach, 1925.

1926

Metropolis, A. Scherl, Berlin, 1926, 8vo., 273p. Editions inscribed 7-11 Tsd.', '11-20 Tsd.' and '17-21 Tsd.' are known.

Die Insel der Unsterblichen, A. Scherl, Berlin, 1926, 189p.

1927

Mann zwischen Frauen, Leipzig, 1927.

Metropolis, Readers Library Publishing Co., 1927, 250p.

1928

Metropolis, Gallimard, Paris, 1928, 96p. Novel.

Metropolis : geautoriseerde vertaling van Maurits J. Vles, met 8 foto's naar de film, Nederlands Vitgevers-Maatschap, Amsterdam, 1928, 208p. Dutch translation of the novelisation, with 8 photographs from the film.

Frau im Mond, Scherl, Berlin, 1928, 210p. Illustrated with 16 images from the Fritz Lang Ufa film.

Spione, A. Scherl, Berlin, 1928, 226p.

The Spy, Readers Library Publishing. Co., London, 1928, 16mo., 252p.

Spione, Script for Fritz Lang, 1928.

Die Frau im Mond (The Woman in the Moon), Script for Fritz Lang, 1928.

Pudovkin, Vsevolod Illiarionovich and Thea von Harbou Filmregie und Filmmanuskript, Verlag der "Lichtbildbuhne", Berlin, 1928, 251p. Series: Bucher der Praxis ; Bd. 5

1929

De Maangodin, Nederl. Uitgevers-Maatschap, Amsterdam, 1929, 217p. Translated by Maurits J. Vles. Illusted with 8 photographs.

Die nach uns kommen. Die Kämpfe einer stolzen Seele. Ein Dorfroman, Berlin, 1929, 252p.

'Frau im Mond', Illustrierte Filmwoche, Berlin, 1929, 16p. Film-Magazin. Sondernummer.

Spies (Spione), G.P. Putnam's Sons, New York & London, 1929, 307p. Photoplay Edition. Translated by Helen J. Steigler. Illustrated.

1930

The Rocket to the Moon, from the novel "The Girl in the Moon", World Wide Publishing Co., New York, 1930, 187p.

The Girl in the Moon, Readers Library Publishing Co., London, 1930, 250p. 8p of plates. Translated by Baroness Von Hutten.

1931

Du bist unmöglich, Jo!, Ullstein, Berlin, 1931, 273p. Vorsatzblatt besch.& Einband verschossen.

M [Murderer Amongst Us], Script for Fritz Lang, 1931.

1932

Das Erste Recht des Kindes (Aus dem Tagebuch einer Fruaenärzin), Script for Wendhausen, 1932.

1933

Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse (The Testament of Dr. Mabuse), Script for Fritz Lang, 1933.

Der Läufer von Marathon, Script for Dupont, 1933.

1934

Spiegs (Spies), Universal, Riga, 1934, 142p. Lettish translation of Spione. Translated by Erika Berzins.

Hanneles Himmelfahrt, Script and director, 1934.

Prinzessin Tourandot, Script for Lamprecht, 1934.

Was bin ich ohne Dich?, Script for Rabenalt, 1934.

1935

Liebesbriefe aus St. Florin, J.J. Weber, Leipzig, 1935, 62p. Series: Weberschiffchenbucherei.

Der alte und der junge König, Script for Steinhoff, 1935.

Ein idealer Gatte, Script for Selpin, 1935.

Ich war Jack Mortimer, Script for Froelich, 1935.

Der Mann mit der Pranke, Script for van der Noss, 1935.

1936

Eine Frau ohne Bedetung (A Woman of No Importance), Script for Steinhoff, 1936.

Eskapade (Seine offizielle Frau), Script for Waschneck, 1936.

Die unmögliche Frau, Script for Meyer, 1936.

1937

Adrian Drost und sein Land, Ullstein, Berlin, 1937, 8to., 241p. Novel.

Der Herrscher (The Ruler), Script for Harlan, 1937.

Versprich mir nichts!, Script for Liebeneiner, 1937.

Mutterlied, Script for Gallone, 1937.

Der zerbrochene Krug (The Broken Jug), Script for Ucicky, 1937.

Solo per te, Script for Gallone, 1937.

1938

Das indische Grabmal (The Indian Tomb), Deutscher Verlag, Berlin, 1938, 243p.

Jugend (Youth), Script for Harlan, 1938.

Verwehte Spuren, Script for Harlan, 1938.

Die Frau am Scheidewegge, Script for von Baky, 1938.

Menschen im Variete, Script for von Baky, 1938.

1939

Hurra! Ich bin Papa!, Script for Hoffmann, 1939.

1940

Lauter Liebe, Script for Rühmann, 1940.

Wie konntest du, Veronika?, Script for Habich, 1940.

1941

Aufblühender Lotos, Deutscher Verlag, Berlin, 1941, 240p. Novel.

Annelie (Die Geschichte eines Lebens), Script for von Baky, 1941.

Am Abend auf der Heide, Script for von Alten, 1941.

1942

Die Gatten, Script, 1942.

Ge Fährtin meines Sommers, Script, 1942.

Mit den Augen einer Frau, Script for Külb, 1942.

1944

Eine Frau für drei Tage, Script for Kirchhoff, 1944.

Erzieherin gesucht, Script for Erfuth. Produced 1944, released 1950.

Via Mala (Die Strasse des Bösen), Script for von Baky. Produced 1944, released 1948.

1945

Fahrt ins Glück, Script for Engel. Produced 1945. Released 1948.

Kolberg (Burning Hearts), Script for Harlan, 1945.

1949

Das Dieb von Bagdad, Holzminden, 1949.

1950

Es kommt ein Tag, Script for Jugert, 1950.

1951

Angelika, Script for Hansen, 1951.

Dr. Holl (Affairs of Dr. Holl), Script, 1951.

1952

Gartenstrasse 64, Ullstein, Berlin, 1952, 223p. Novel.

1953

Dein Herz ist meine Heimat, Script for Häussler, 1953.

1954

{Thea von Harbou died in Berlin on 1 July 1954.}

1963

Metropolis, Ace Books, New York, 1963, 222p. Series - An Ace Science Fiction Classic, F-246. Based on the 1927 English-language London edition. Preface by F.J. Ackermann

1968

M - a film, Simon and Schuster, New York, 1968, 108p. Screenplay.

1973

Metropolis, Ace Books, New York, [1973], 222p. Series - Science Fiction from the Great Years, 52831.

Metropolis, Faber and Faber, London & Boston, 1973 & 1989, 131p. Screenplay.

M : a film, Lorrimer, London, 1973, 108p. Screenplay.

1975

Metropolis, Gregg Press, Boston, 1975, xv, 250 p., [8] leaves of plates. Series - The Gregg Press Science Fiction Series.

1977

Metropolis, Martinez Roca, Barcelona, 1977, 188p. Series - Coleccion Super Ficcion, 16.

The Rocket to the Moon, Gregg Press, Boston, 1977, 187p. Reprint of 1930 edition.

1978

Metropolis, Verlag Ullstein, Ungekurzte Ausg., Frankfurt am Main, 1978, 223p

1984

Metropolis, Ozeanische Bibliothek, Frankfurt am Main, 1984, 204p. Forward by Herbert W. Franke.

Keiner, Reinhold, Thea von Harbou und der deutsche Film bis 1933 (Thea von Harbou and her German films to 1933), Olms, Hildesheim & New York, 1984.

1985

Metropolis, Ediciones Orbis, Barcelona, 1985, 188p. Series - Biblioteca de ciencia ficcion, 23.

Weimar, ein Sommertagstraum; Tiefurt aus den Memorien eines Sonnenstrahls; Belvedere in einer Vollmondnacht, R. Buchmann, Weimar, 1985, 54p.

1986

Das indische Grabmal (The Indian Tomb), Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, Frankfurt am Main, 1986, 175p. Reprint of 1921 edition.

1988

Metropolis, Donning, Norfolk, 1988, 170p. Illustrated by Michael Kaluta.

1989

Frau im Mond : Mit einem Bildteil und einem Nachwort anlasslich des zwanzigsten Jahrestages der ersten Mondlandung am 20. Juli 1969, 1989, 237p. Heyne Science Fiction & Fantasy, 4676.

Metropolis, Xanadu, London, 1989, 224p.

1993

Karin Bruns, 'Thea von Harbou: zur Literatur- und Filmproduktion einer Autorin (1910-1945', PhD thesis, Universität Essen, 1993, 265p.

1994

Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse, Rogner & Bernhard, Hamburg, 1994, 446p. Script by Thea von Harbou and Fritz Lang, based on a novel by Jacques Norbert.

1995

Karin Bruns, Kinomythen 1920-1945 : die Filmentwürfe der Thea von Harbou, J.B. Metzler, Stuttgart, 1995, 282p.

1997

Nina Zimnik, 'The formation of feminine fascist subjectivity : Thea von Harbou and Leni Riefenstahl', PhD, University of New York, 1997, 258p.

Last updated: 24 November 2000.

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