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Year 2000 Product Capability Detail Report

Intel is pleased to provide you with the following year 2000 Product Capability Detail Report. This report is intended to help you address the transition to the year 2000.

Intel has taken steps to provide accurate information regarding the capability of its products. However, year 2000 capability information can change. Intel cannot guarantee that the information contained in this report is complete, current, or applicable in all situations.

Product Type(s): Motherboards for Intel® Pentium® Processors
Product Name: Advanced/EV
Capability Level: Not "Year 2000 Capable"
"Year 2000 Capable" Limited Warranty: No
 
Customer Options:
BIOS version: 1.00.01.CQ0

There are three known year 2000 issues related to this product (see Product Behavior, below, for descriptions of these issues.) You can avoid them by doing the following:

How to avoid ISSUE #1 (BIOS setup issue):

The first time you start or reset your computer after the year changes from 1999 to 2000, allow the system to boot up completely; do not interrupt the bootup process to access the BIOS SETUP menu. (Thereafter, if you wish to access BIOS SETUP during bootup, the system will continue to maintain the date properly.)

How to avoid ISSUE #2 ("Leap day" rollover issue):

Your system's date will automatically roll over correctly from February 28, 2000 to February 29, 2000. If you wish to set the system date to February 29, 2000 manually, the Operating System (OS) date utility should be used. (Please see your OS documentation for instructions.) You cannot set the system date to February 29, 2000 using the BIOS Setup Utility.

Note: The two options above assume that your OS is "Year 2000 Capable". If your OS or software application does not reflect the correct date after December 31, 1999, please contact your software vendor for information about the year 2000 capability of your OS or application software.

How to avoid ISSUE #3 (Year 2000 rollover issue):

There is a very slight probability that the BIOS in this product could return the wrong date, if the OS or an application requests the date during a fraction of a second just as the year is changing from 1999 to 2000. The chances of a typical user experiencing this issue are extremely remote. However, you can avoid the issue entirely by shutting down your computer before midnight December 31, 1999 and not turning it on again until Jan 1, 2000. (Note that systems running in a Windows NT environment are not affected by this issue.)
 
Product Behavior:
There are three year 2000 issues related to this product (BIOS version 1.00.01.CQ0):

ISSUE #1: BIOS setup

An incorrect century may be displayed in the BIOS SETUP utility, if the user accesses this Utility before the computer is allowed to completely boot to the operating system at least one time after the year changes from 1999 to 2000.

ISSUE #2: "Leap day" rollover

The system date field cannot be set to February 29, 2000 by using the BIOS Setup utility; if you set the month to February and year to 2000, the Utility will not allow you to enter "29" as the day. However, the system will automatically roll over correctly from February 28, 2000 to February 29, 2000 as long as you are not accessing the BIOS Setup during the rollover.

ISSUE #3: Year 2000 rollover

The BIOS in this product could possibly return the wrong date, if the date request is made to the BIOS just as the year is changing from 1999 to 2000. However, for this error to occur, the OS or an application would have to ask the BIOS for the date within less than a 2-millionth-of-a-second window of time around midnight December 31, 1999, when the year changes from 99 to 00 in the Real Time Clock on the motherboard. If the date is requested at any time outside of this microsecond window, the correct date information will be returned.

Date requests to the BIOS typically are made only during system bootup. Once the OS is booted, the vast majority of applications access date information via the OS rather than through the BIOS.

Following is a description of how this issue affects specific operating systems.

Windows 98 will automatically recognize 1900 as an error condition and change the year to 2000. In addition, most applications running in a Windows 98 environment will access the date/year through the OS, not the BIOS. As a result, these applications are not affected by this issue. Applications that do access the date/year through the BIOS could possibly be affected by this issue, if a date/year access by the application occurs within a 2-millionths-of-a-second window around midnight December 31, 1999.

DOS, Windows 3.x, and Windows 95 only request the date from the BIOS during the bootup process. If the system boots up around midnight, December 31, 1999, and the OS requests the date from the BIOS within a 2-millionth-of-a-second window, an incorrect year could be generated. After boot up, the OS keeps track of the date and year internally, and there is no risk of the date error recurring. Most applications request date information from the OS rather than the BIOS. This potential error does not apply to these applications. Applications that do access the date/year through the BIOS could possibly be affected by this issue, if a date/year access by the application occurs within the 2-millionths-of-a-second window around midnight December 31, 1999.

Windows NT does not access the date through the BIOS; it gets the date directly from the RTC. As a result, systems running in a Windows NT environment are not affected by this issue. In addition, applications running under NT are prevented from accessing BIOS calls, so they are not affected by the issue.

NOT "YEAR 2000 CAPABLE"

This product does not meet Intel's definition of "Year 2000 Capable" and Intel will not provide a fix or upgrade that will make the product "Year 2000 Capable." Customers should not use products in this category after December 31, 1999, or earlier if your system uses future dates. Be aware that if your system uses future dates, you may experience problems as soon as the system tries to use a date beyond December 31, 1999. We suggest that you review the section on Product Behavior described in the detailed product information and decide for yourself if you want to continue using the product.

The owner and users assume all responsibility and risk for use of these products through or after December 31, 1999, or an earlier date if future date referencing by the system causes a century rollover issue to occur prior to December 31, 1999.

Intel's Definition of "Year 2000 Capable"

An Intel product, when used in accordance with its associated documentation, is "Year 2000 Capable" when, upon installation, it accurately stores, displays, processes, provides, and/or receives date data from, into, and between 1999 and 2000, and the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including leap year calculations, provided that all other technology used in combination with said product properly exchanges date data with it. Intel makes no representation about individual components within the product should they be used independently from the product as a whole.

The only proper method of accessing the date in systems with Intel motherboards or server baseboards is indirectly from the Real Time Clock (RTC) via the BIOS. The BIOS in Intel motherboards and baseboards contain a century checking and maintenance feature that checks the least two significant digits of the year stored in the RTC during each BIOS request (INT 1Ah) to read the date and, if less than `80' (i.e. 1980 is the first year supported by the PC), updates the century byte to `20'. This feature enables operating systems and applications using the BIOS date/time services to reliably manipulate the year as a four-digit value.

For more information on proper date access in systems with Intel motherboards, please see Year 2000 Information and General Comments on Intel Components.

 

Contact Intel and provide specific product information that you could not find in the Year 2000 Product Capability Database.

The information here is designated a "Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure" pursuant to the Year 2000 Information and Readiness Disclosure Act, Public Law 105-271.

All Year 2000 information is provided "AS IS" and Intel does not warrant that it is error free, nor does it provide any other warranties or conditions, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. NEITHER INTEL NOR ITS VENDORS SHALL BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES RELATED TO ANY YEAR 2000 INFORMATION, WHETHER ARISING OUT OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE, TORT, UNDER ANY WARRANTY, OR OTHERWISE. This document is not a contract or an offer for a contract. Year 2000 information, including information about Intel's products, is changed and updated regularly. Intel retains the right to make changes to this document and its products at any time, without notice. For current information, please check Intel's website regularly.


 
 
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