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Mamfé

Southwest Province

John Tustin, Mamfé 1998-2000
Math and Science Education
tustinjohn@hotmail.com
Steve Loschi, Mamfé 1999-2001
Math and Science Education
steveloschi@yahoo.co.uk
Introduction

Location

Terrain

People

Things to Do

Getting There and Away Close Villages

Health

Festivals

Languages

Climate

Cuisine

Contacts

SPECIAL WRITINGS:

John Tustin's Journal
Read about John's life in Mamfe and Garoua, including a crazy encounter with a rodent.

Benoue National Park
The story of John's trip to this park in the northern province.


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INTRODUCTION:

Mamfé, the capital of the Manyu sub-division in the anglophone Southwest Province, is an important trading, administrative, and regional center, although its importance has declined in the past few decades.

LOCATION:

Mamfé is the last major town on the road between Douala and Nigeria. The town of 10 - 20,000 inhabitants lies about 60 km from the Nigerian border. The roads in the region are horrible, especially in the rainy season, and are comparable to those in the East Province.

LANDFORMS:

While originally covered in rainforest, the area in and around Mamfé has been deforested. The Manyu/Cross River flows along the town outskirts and heads into Nigeria.

PEOPLE:

There are many ethnic groups in the area; the largest are the Bayangi and the Akwaya. Mamfé also has a large Nigerian population and several expatriates (American and Canadian missionaries, Chinese road workers, and a PCV since time immemorial). Most people in Mamfé are Catholic or Presbyterian, and the number of Baptists has been increasing. Witchcraft abounds.

THINGS TO DO:

While Mamfé does have an airport on the way to the Ossing road, it is not a frequent stop over of the international jetset. However, there are a few things to do in town if you ever find yourself in that part of Central Africa. The Data Club has expensive food and a satellite television (CNN!), and nearby is an old German bridge. On the other side of town, past the market, is a newer and quite impressive bridge that spans the Manyu. Contrary to rumors, there are no longer any hippopotami in the river, but forest elephants apparently still exist in the area. There is a daily market; the one on Saturday is the biggest and the most interesting. There are several good places to eat near the market, and Santa Restaurant by the post office is a good chop house.

GETTING THERE AND AWAY:

160 km and 4 hours from the nearest city. The trip costs 3100. To reach the village from Yaounde:
Yaounde to Douala: 3500
Douala to Limbe: 1000
Limbe to Kumba: 1500
Kumba to Mamfe: 3000

CLOSE VILLAGES:

Kembong, Tintio, Nguti

CONTACTS:

Mr. Bate Epey Oben 34-10-06, Principal, GHS Mamfe

LODGING:

Data Hotel

HEALTH:

Besongabang Hospital (sucks and the doctor is a child molester), The water sucked. It was out for over a month with no other source of clean water so I bathed in shit water for a while. I actually poured water from my well, which was ten feet from the pit latrine, into my blue water filter and held my breath as I bathed.

SCHOOLS:

GBHS Mamfe, GHS Mamfe, GTTC Mamfe, PHS Besongabong, GTHS Mamfe and so on.

FESTIVALS:

All the same Cameroonian festivals.

POPULATION:

10000

LANGUAGES:

Kenyang, Ejagham

RELIGIONS:

mostly Presbyterian, Catholic

GROUPS:

Bayangi and Ejagham

CLIMATE:

Hot and Humid as the Pits of Hell, Gutted rainforest

ELECTRICITY:

There was electricity and it was okay towards the end.

OTHER:

Mamfe people enjoy wearing Tupac Shakur t-shirts and listening to "The Thong Song" by Sisqo. In their spare time they like to turn into elephants and practice various other forms of witchcraft.

Attention volunteers, past and present: Have you submitted your post information yet?