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Safe List

Acacia Gum
Acorn Quercus
Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
Alfalfa
Amaranth
Adzuki Bean
Agar
Algae
Almond Nut
Annatto
Apple Cider Vinegar
Arabic Gum
Arrowroot
Artichokes
Astragalus Gummifer
Baking Soda
Balsamic Vinegar
Beans
Bean, Adzuki
Bean, Hyacinth
Bean, Lentil
Bean, Mung
Bean Romano (Chickpea)
Bean Tepary
Besan
Bicarbonate of Soda
(some contain gluten)
Buckwheat
Butter (beware of additives)
Canola Oil
Carageenan Chondrus Crispus
Carob Bean
Carob Bean Gum
Carob Flour
Cassava Manihot Esculenta
Cellulose1
Cellulose Gum
Cheeses
(except blue & chilton)
Chickpea
Corn
Corn Meal
Corn Flour
Cornstarch
Corn Syrup
Cowitch
Cowpea
Cream of Tartar

Distilled Vinegar
Eggs
Fish (fresh)
Flaked Rice
Flax
Fruit (including dried)
Gelatin
Gram flour (chick peas)
Grits, Corn
Guar Gum
Herbs
Honey
Hyacinth Bean
Job's Tears
Kasha (roasted buckwheat)
Kudzu Root Starch
Lentil
Locust Bean Gum
Maize
Maize Waxy
Maltodextrin4
Manioc
Masa Flour
Masa Harina
Meat (fresh)
Methyl Cellulose2
Milk
Millet
Milo
Mung Bean
Nuts (except wheat, rye & barley)
Nut, Acron
Nut, Almond
Oats3
Oils and Fats
Peas
Pea - Chick
Pea - Cow
Pea Flour
Pigeon Peas
Polenta
Potatoes
Potato Flour
Prinus
Psyllium
Quinoa
Ragi

Rape
Rice
Rice Flour
Rice Vinegar
Romano Bean (chickpea)
Sago Palm
Sago Flour
Saifun (bean threads)
Scotch Whisky
Seaweed|
Seeds (except wheat, rye & barley)
Seed - Sesame
Seed - Sunflower
Soba (be sure it's 100% buckwheat)
Sorghum
Sorghum Flour
Soy
Soybean
Spices (pure)
Spirits (Specific Types)
Starch (made in USA)
Succotash (corn and beans)
Subflower Seed
Sweet Chestnut Flour
Tapioca
Tapioca Flour
Tea
Tea-Tree Oil
Teff
Teff Flour
Tepary Bean
Tofu-Soya Curd
Tragacanth
Tragacanth Gum
Turmeric (Kurkuma)
Urad Beans
Urad Dal (peas) Vegetables
Urid flour
Vinegars (Specific Types)
Waxy Maize
Whey
White Vinegar
Wines
Wine Vinegars (& Balsamic)
Wild Rice
Xanthan Gum
Yam Flour
Yogurt (plain, unflavored)
  1. Cellulose is a carbohydrate polymer of D-glucose.  It is the structural material of plants, such as wood in trees. It contains no gluten protein.
  2. Methyl cellulose is a chemically modified form of cellulose that makes a good substitute for gluten in rice-based breads, etc.
  3. Cross-contamination with wheat is a slight possibility.
  4. Maltodextrin is prepared as a white powder or concentrated solution by partial hydrolysis of corn starch or potato starch with safe and suitable acids and enzymes. (1) Maltodextrin, when listed on food sold in the USA, must be (per FDA regulation) made from corn or potato. This rule does NOT apply to vitamin or mineral supplements and medications. (2)  Donald Kasarda Ph.D., a research chemist specializing on grain proteins, of the United States Department of Agriculture, found that all maltodextrins in the USA are made from corn starch, using enzymes that are NOT derived from wheat, rye, barley, or oats. On that basis he believes that celiacs need not be too concerned about maltodextrins, though he cautions that there is no guarantee that a manufacturer won't change their process to use wheat starch or a gluten-based enzyme in the future. (3) - May 1997 Sprue-Nik News
    (1) Federal Register (4-1-96) 21 CFR. Ch.1, Section 184.1444
    (2) "Additives Alert", an information sheet from the Greater Philadelphia Celiac Support Group, updated early in 1997. This specific information comes from Nancy Patin Falini, the dietitian advisor for the group and a speaker at a national celiac conferences in the past few years.
    (3) From the CELLIAC Listserv archives, on the Internet, Donald D. Kasarda, posted November 6, 1996.

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Safe Additives (Gluten-Free)

Adipic Acid
Acacia Gum
Agar
Algin
Alginate
Allicin
Aluminium
Annatto Color
Arabic Gum
Aspartame (can cause IBS symtoms)
Aspic
Ascorbic Acid
Benzoic acid
Betaine
BHA
BHT
Beta Carotene
Biotin
Butylated Hydroxyanisole
Butyl Compounds
Calcium Carbonate
Calcium Chloride
Calcium Phosphate
Calcium Silicate
Calcium Stearate
Camphor
Caprylic Acid
Carboxymethylcellulose
Carnuaba Wax
Carob Bean Gum
Carrageenan
Casein
Castor Oil
Cellulose Gum
Cetyl Alcohol
Chlorella
Chymosin
Citric Acid (made in USA)1
Collagen
Corn Swetener
Corn Syrup Solids
Cortisone
Cotton Seed Oil
Cysteine, L
Demineralized Whey
Desamidocollagen
Dextrimaltose
Dextrose
Dioctyl Sodium
Elastin
Ester Gum
Folic Acid-Folacin
Formaldehyde
Fructose
Fumaric Acid
Gelatine
Glutamic Acid
Glycerides
Glyceryl Nono-Oleate
Glycerol Monooleate
Glycol
Glycolic acid
Guar Gum
Hemp
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrolyzed soy protein
Iodine
Invert Sugar
Keratin
Latic Acid
Lactose
Lanolin
Lecithin
Lipase
Locust Bean Gum
Magnesium Carbonate
Magnesium Hydroxide
Malic Acid
Maltitol
Microcrystallin Cellulose
Mineral Oil
Mineral Salts
Monosodium Glutamate MSG (made in USA)
Monopotassium Phosphate
Musk
M Vitamins & Minerals
Niacin-Niacinamide
Oleyl Alcohol/Oil
Parrafin
Pepsin
Peru Balsam
Petrolatum
Phenylalanine
Polyethylene Glycol
Polyglycerol
Polysorbates
Polysorbate 60; 80
Potassium Citrate
Potassium Iodide
Pristane
Propolis
Propylene Glycol Monostearete
Propylgallate
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride
Rennet
Reticulin
Rosin
Royal Jelly
Sphingolipids
Sodium Acid Pyraphosphate
Sodium Ascorbate
Sodium Benzoate
Sodium Citrate
Sodium Erythrobate
Sodium Hexametaphosphate
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate
Sodium Nitrate
Sodium Silaco Aluminate
Sodium Stannate
Sorbic Acid
Sorbitol-Mannitol (can cause IBS symtoms)
Soy Lecithin
Stearates
Stearamide
Stearamine
Stearic Acid
Sucrose
Sulfosuccinate
Sulphites
Sulpur Dioxide
Tallow
Tartaric Acid
TBHQ is Tetra or Tributylhydroquinone
Thiamine Hydrochoride
Tolu Balsam
Tragacanth Gum
Tri-Calcium Phosphate
Tyrosine
Vanillan
Vitamin A (palmitate)
Whey
Xanthan Gum
  1. Citric Acid: All the citric acid produced in the US is made from corn.  Outside the USA the acid can also be derived from other sources of dextrose, including cane sugar and wheat.  Some of the citric acid used in the US is imported from other countries, such as China. Imported citric acid may be made from corn, sugar or wheat.  USA made citric acid capacity remains stable. There are three domestic producers of citric acid--Archer Daniels Midland, Cargill, and Haarmann & Reimer--with total capability of 460 million lb/yr of citric acid. All three produce citric acid through the fermentation of corn-based dextrose. 

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Forbidden List

Abyssinian Hard (Wheat Triticum duran)
Alcohol (Spirits - Specific Types)
Artificial Color4
Artificial Flavoring6
Baking Powder2
Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
Barley Hordeum vulgare
Barley Malt
Beer
Bleached Flour
Blue Cheese (made with bread)
Bran
Bread Flour
Brewer's Yeast
Brown Flour
Bulgar (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
Bulgar Wheat
Calcium Caseinate (Contains MSG)
Caramel Color3
Cereal Binding
Chilton
Citric Acid4
Coloring
Couscous
Dextrins1
Durum Wheat Triticum
Edible Starch
Einkorn Wheat
Farina Graham
Filler
Flavoring6
Food Starch
Fu (dried wheat gluten)
Germ
Glutamate (Free)
Glutamine (amino acid)
Graham Flour
Granary Flour
Gravy Cubes4
Groats (barley, wheat)
Ground Spices4
Gum Base
Hard Wheat
Hydrolyzed Plant Protein (HPP)4
Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP)4
Inulin4
Kamut (Pasta wheat)
Malt
Malt Extract
Malt Syrup
Malt Flavoring
Malt Vinegar
Miso4
Matzo Semolina
Modified Food Starch4
Modified Starch4
Mono and Diglycerides2
MSG (Made outside USA)4
Mustard Powder 4
Natural Flavoring6
Pasta
Pearl Barley
Rice Malt (contains barley or Koji)
Rye
Seitan
Semolina
Semolina Triticum
Shoyu (soy sauce)4
Small Spelt
Soba Noodles4
Sodium Caseinate (Contains MSG)
Soy Sauce
Spirits (Specific Types)
Spelt (Triticum Spelta)
Sprouted Wheat or Barley
Starch4
Stock Cubes4
Strong Flour
Suet in Packets
Tabbouleh
Teriyaki Sauce
Textured Vegetable Protein - TVP
Triticale X triticosecale
Udon ( wheat noodles)
Vegetable Starch
Vinegars (Specific Types)
Vitamins4
Wheat Triticum aestivum
Wheat Nuts
Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
Wheat, Bulgar
Wheat Durum Triticum
Wheat Triticum mononoccum
Wheat Starch5
Wheat Germ (oil)
Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
Whole-Meal Flour
  1. Dextrin is an incompletely hydrolyzed starch. It is prepared by dry heating corn, waxy maize, waxy milo, potato, arrowroot, WHEAT, rice, tapioca, or sago starches, or by dry heating the starches after: (1) Treatment with safe and suitable alkalis, acids, or pH control agents and (2) drying the acid or alkali treated starch. (1) Therefore, unless you know the source, you must avoid dextrin. According to a Sept./Oct. 2001 article titled "Know the Facts" in Gluten-Free Living, probably all dextrins made in the USA are gluten-free.

    May 1997 Sprue-Nik News.
    (1) Federal Register (4-1-96 Edition) 21CFR Ch.1, Section 184.12277.
    (2) Federal Register (4-1-96) 21 CFR. Ch.1, Section 184.1444

  2. Mono and diglycerides can contain a wheat carrier in the USA. While they are derivatives of fats, carbohydrate chains may be used as a binding substance in their preparation, which are usually corn or wheat, so this needs to be checked out with the manufacturer. According to a Sept./Oct. 2001 article titled "Know the Facts" in Gluten-Free Living, probably all mono and diglycerides made in the USA are gluten-free.
  3. The problem with caramel color is it may or may not contain gluten depending on how it is manufactured. In the U.S.A. caramel color must conform with the FDA standard of identity from 21CFR CH.1. This statute says: "the color additive caramel is the dark-brown liquid or solid material resulting from the carefully controlled heat treatment of the following food-grade carbohydrates: Dextrose (corn sugar), Invert sugar, Lactose (milk sugar), Malt syrup (usually from barley malt), Molasses (from cane), Starch Hydrolysates and fractions thereof (can include wheat), Sucrose (cane or beet)." Also, acids, alkalis and salts are listed as additives which may be employed to assist the caramelization process.
  4. Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
  5. Most celiac organizations in the USA and Canada do not believe that wheat starch is safe for celiacs. In Europe, however, Codex Alimentarius Quality wheat starch is considered acceptable in the celiac diet by most doctors and celiac organizations. This is a higher quality of wheat starch than is generally available in the USA or Canada.
  6. According to 21 C.F.R. S 101,22(a)(3): "[t]he terns 'natural flavor' or 'natural flavoring' means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional."

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Additional Things To Beware Of:

  • Rice and soy beverages (i.e., Rice Dream), because their production process utilizes barley enzymes.
  • Bad advice from health-food store employees (i.e., that spelt and/or kamut is/are safe for celiacs).
  • Cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains (usually via the scoops).
  • Wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter, etc.
  • Lotions, creams and cosmetics (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis).
  • Stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels.
  • Toothpaste and mouthwash (major brands in USA are safe).
  • Medicines: many contain gluten.
  • Cereals: most contain malt flavoring, or some other non-GF ingredient.
  • Some brands of rice paper.
  • Sauce mixes and sauces (soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc.).
  • Ice cream.
  • Packet & canned soups.
  • Dried meals and gravy mixes.
  • Laxatives.
  • Grilled restaurant food - gluten contaminated grill.
  • Fried restaurant foods - gluten contaminated grease.
  • Ground spices - wheat flour is sometimes used to prevent clumping.

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American Dietetic Association Revises Its Gluten-Free Guidelines

Celiac.com 12/10/2000 - As reported in Ann Whelan's September/October issue of Gluten-Free Living, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) has released the 6th edition of its Manual of Clinical Dietetics, which offers revised guidelines for the treatment of celiac disease. This manual is currently used by hospitals and doctors all over North America, and represents the most up-to-date source of information with regard to the dietary treatment of various illnesses. The new standards set in this publication conform more closely with current international standards. Included on their safe list are items that have been on Celiac.com's safe list for over five years, including: amaranth, buckwheat, distilled vinegar (no matter what its source), distilled alcoholic beverages (including rum, gin, whiskey and vodka), millet, quinoa and teff.

A team of American and Canadian dietitians wrote the new gluten-free guidelines, including: Shelley Case, RD, Mavis Molloy, RD, Marion Zarkadas, M.Sc.RD (all from Canada and all members of the Professional Advisory Board of the Canadian Celiac Association), and Cynthia Kupper, CRD, CDE (Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group and celiac). Additional findings of this team regarding buckwheat and quinoa contradict what has been accepted as common knowledge for years by some US support groups, mainly that these two grains are more likely to be contaminated by wheat than other grains. In fact, according to the team, buckwheat and quinoa are far less likely to be contaminated than most other grains.

At the most basic level the new guidelines mean that celiacs do not need to avoid foods containing unidentified vinegar or distilled alcohol, this alone will allow much more freedom when shopping or eating out. Further, celiacs who drink alcohol will have much more freedom and a far greater choice when they want to have a drink. Additionally, celiacs will be able to more easily maintain a well-rounded and nutritious diet because they will have access to a far greater number of highly nutritious and safe grains.

The ADA's 6th edition of the Manual of Clinical Dietetics represents the first time that Canadian and United States dietary guidelines have come together to create a united North American gluten-free standard, and will hopefully lead to the adoption of a single standard by all US support groups so that hundreds of thousands of celiacs will not have to unnecessarily exclude more foods than necessary. These new guidelines go a long way towards an international standard, which should be the ultimate goal for all celiacs and celiac organizations in the world.

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