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WHO'S BEHIND GOOGLE

Co-founders Larry Page, president of Products, and Sergey Brin, president of Technology, brought Google to life in September 1998. Since then, the company has expanded to more than 260 employees worldwide, with a management team that represents some of the most experienced technology professionals in the industry, backed by funding from two leading venture capital firms. Recently, Dr. Eric E. Schmidt joined Google as chairman and chief executive officer.

Staff Facts

Approximate number of employees: 260
Ph.D.s on staff: 50+
Languages spoken: 34
Number of roller hockey players: 32
Number of offices worldwide: 8
Massage Therapists: 2
Neurosurgeons: 1

Funding

Google is a privately held company with primary financial backing from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and Sequoia Capital, which together led an equity round of $25 million in June 1999. Google also has benefited from several other high-profile investors, including Stanford University, Andy Bechtolsheim (co-founder of Sun Microsystems and current vice president of engineering of the Gigabit Switching Group at Cisco Systems), and Ram Shriram, an entrepreneur who previously held senior executive positions at Netscape, Junglee and Amazon.com.

Management Team

Dr. Eric E. Schmidt, Chairman and CEO
Larry Page, Co-founder & President, Products
Sergey Brin, Co-founder & President, Technology
Omid Kordestani, Senior Vice President, Worldwide Business Development & Sales
Tim Armstrong, Vice President, Advertising Sales
Joan Braddi, Vice President, Search Services
Wayne Rosing, Vice President, Engineering
Urs Hölzle, Google Fellow
Craig Silverstein, Director of Technology
Cindy McCaffrey, Vice President, Corporate Marketing

Board of Directors

Dr. Eric E. Schmidt, Chairman and CEO
Sergey Brin, Google Inc.
John Doerr, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers
Michael Moritz, Sequoia Capital
Larry Page, Google Inc.
Ram Shriram

Technical Advisory Council

Jakob Nielsen, Nielsen Norman Group
Rajeev Motwani, Professor, Stanford University
Jeffrey Ullman, Professor, Stanford University
Terry Winograd, Professor, Stanford University

 


Google Inc. Management Team

Dr. Eric E. Schmidt
Chairman and CEO

dr. eric schmidtGoogle founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin recruited Eric Schmidt from Novell, where he led that company's strategic planning, management and technology development as chairman and CEO. Schmidt's Novell experience culminated a 20-year record of achievement as an Internet strategist, entrepreneur and developer of great technologies. Schmidt's well-seasoned perspective perfectly complements Google's needs as a young and rapidly growing search engine with a unique corporate culture.

Prior to his appointment at Novell, Schmidt was chief technology officer and corporate executive officer at Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he led the development of Java, Sun's platform-independent programming technology, and defined Sun's Internet software strategy. Before joining Sun in 1983, Schmidt was a member of the research staff at the Computer Science Lab at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), and held positions at Bell Laboratories and Zilog. Schmidt has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Princeton University, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California-Berkeley.

Schmidt is an avid pilot and political junkie who never tires of debating the great issues of our day and the relative merits of small plane jet propulsion systems.

Larry Page
Co-founder & President, Products

larry pageLarry Page was Google's founding CEO and grew the company to more than 200 employees and profitability before moving into his new role in April 2001. The son of Michigan State University computer science professor Dr. Carl Victor Page, Larry's love of computers began at age six. While following in his father's footsteps in academics, Larry became an honors graduate from cross-state rival the University of Michigan, where he earned a bachelor's of science in engineering degree, with a concentration on computer engineering. During his time in Ann Arbor, Page received numerous leadership awards for his efforts towardimproving the College of Engineering, served as president of the University's Eta Kappa Nu Honor Society and built a programmable plotter and inkjet printer out of Legos™.

Page, 29, met Sergey Brin while they were both Ph.D. candidates in computer science at Stanford University. In 1995 they started work on the research that led to Google. Together, they developed and ran Google, which began operating in 1998. The first paper they authored on Google, "The Anatomy of a Large Scale Hypertextual Search Engine," is now the 10th most accessed paper of all time according to the main computer science bibliography server.

Page has discussed business and technology on national broadcast programs including CNNfn and the Charlie Rose Show and as a speaker at numerous national and international forums, including The Churchill Club, the Wall Street Journal Technology Summit, The Commonwealth Club, Technologic Partners and PC Forum. He is a member of the National Advisory Committee (NAC) for the University of Michigan College of Engineering.

Sergey Brin
Co-founder & President, Technology

sergey brinSergey Brin, a native of Moscow, received a bachelor of science degree with honors in mathematics and computer science from the University of Maryland at College Park. He is currently on leave from the Ph.D. program in computer science at Stanford University, where he received his master's degree. Sergey, 28, is a recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. It was at Stanford he met Larry Page and worked on the project that became Google. Together they founded Google, Inc. in 1998.

Brin's research interests include search engines, information extraction from unstructured sources, and data mining of large text collections and scientific data. He has published more than a dozen publications in leading academic journals, including Extracting Patterns and Relations from the World Wide Web; Dynamic Data Mining: A New Architecture for Data with High Dimensionality, which he published with Larry Page; Scalable Techniques for Mining Casual Structures; Dynamic Itemset Counting and Implication Rules for Market Basket Data; and Beyond Market Baskets: Generalizing Association Rules to Correlations.

Brin has been a featured speaker at a number of national and international academic, business and technology forums including the Academy of American Achievement; European Technology Forum; Technology, Entertainment and Design; and Silicon Alley 2001. When not juggling his many responsibilities as company president, Brin studies the trapeze and scuba diving and participates enthusiastically in parking lot roller hockey games with other Googlers.

Omid Kordestani
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Business Development & Sales

omid kordestaniOmid Kordestani has more than a dozen years of high-technology consumer and enterprise experience, including key positions at Internet pioneer Netscape Communications. As vice president of business development & sales, Kordestani grew Netscape's website revenue from an annual run-rate of $88 million to more than $200 million in 18 months.

Kordestani joined Netscape as director of OEM sales, and during his four-year career at that company he was responsible for establishing major customer relationships with Citibank, AOL, Amazon, Intuit, Travelocity, Intel, @Home, eBay, and Excite. Prior to Netscape, Kordestani held positions in marketing, product management, and business development at The 3DO Company, Go Corporation, and Hewlett-Packard.

Kordestani received an MBA from Stanford University and a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from San Jose State University.

Tim Armstrong
Vice President,
Advertising Sales

tim armstrongTim Armstrong joined Google from Snowball.com. As that company's Vice President of Sales and Strategic Partnerships, he managed a team of 100 people and built the revenue foundation needed to take the company public in just 16 months. Armstrong was also responsible for key strategic partnerships that included equity and marketing investments by New Line Cinema and an exclusive partnership with the NFL.

Prior to his role at Snowball.com, Armstrong served as National Sales Manager for IDG's first Internet magazine, I-Way, before founding and serving as Director of Integrated Sales & Marketing at Starwave's and Disney's ABC/ESPN Internet Ventures. Armstrong is a graduate of Connecticut College with a double major in Economics and Sociology. A dedicated marathon runner, Armstrong does not require sleep or sustenance beyond an occasional nap and protein bar.

Joan Braddi
Vice President, Search Services

joan braddiJoan Braddi has more than a dozen years of high-technology sales and marketing experience in both the business and consumer markets. Before joining Google, she held the position of director of business development and sponsorship sales for Netcenter, Netscape's website division. By nurturing relationships with eBay, Network Solutions and other major sponsorship partners, she grew advertising and sponsorship revenue from $2 million per quarter to $12 million per quarter within 12 months. She was also responsible for business development opportunities within the business, computing, and Internet channels on Netcenter. As senior manager of Netscape's OEM sales, her first role with that company, Braddi established partnerships with Hewlett Packard, Oracle, Computer Associates, SGI, and Informix among others.

Prior to joining Netscape, Braddi oversaw emerging markets, applications, and OEM markets for the server division of Silicon Graphics. She is a graduate of San Jose State University with a degree in business administration. Braddi is confident she will soon be able to use Google to find an hour of leisure time and something to do with it.

Wayne Rosing
Vice President, Engineering

wayne rosingWayne Rosing has more than 30 years of engineering and research experience at some of Silicon Valley's most respected companies. He joined Google from Caere Corporation, where his most recent position was chief technology officer and vice president of Engineering. Rosing managed all engineering for Caere's optical character recognition (OCR) product lines and was the driving force behind the acquisition of the comprehensive forms application Omniform, which became one of Caere's key products.

Prior to joining Caere, Rosing served as president of FirstPerson, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Sun Microsystems. While at FirstPerson, Rosing headed the team that developed the technology base for Java. That success was preceded by his founding of Sun Microsystems Laboratories, which grew to more than 100 researchers under his leadership. Earlier in his career, Rosing was Director of Engineering for the Apple Computer LISA and Apple II divisions and held management positions at Digital Equipment and Data General.

His interest in the natural world has led him to explore the outer reaches of space through remote robotic telescopes he designs and builds himself and to the depths of the South Pacific where he plays undersea paparazzi to exotic sea creatures.

Urs Hölzle
Google Fellow

urs holzleUrs Hölzle joined Google from the University of California, Santa Barbara where he was an associate professor of computer science. He received a master's degree in computer science from ETH Zurich in 1988 and was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship that same year. In 1994, he earned a Ph.D. from Stanford University, where his research focused on programming languages and their efficient implementation.

As one of the pioneers of dynamic compilation, also known as "just-in-time compilation," Hölzle invented fundamental techniques used in most of today's leading Java compilers. Before joining Google, Hölzle was a cofounder of Animorphic Systems, which developed compilers for Smalltalk and Java. After Sun Microsystems acquired Animorphic Systems in 1997, Hölzle helped build Javasoft's high-performance Hotspot Java compiler.

In 1996, Hölzle received a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation for his work on high-performance implementations of object-oriented languages. Hölzle was also a leading contributor to DARPA's National Compiler Infrastructure project. He has served on program committees for major conferences in the field of programming language implementation, and is the author of numerous scientific papers and U.S. patents.

Hölzle was named Google Fellow after serving as the company's first VP of Engineering. In that role he led development of the company's operational infrastructure and was renowned for both his red socks and his free-range Leonberger, Yoshka (Google's top dog).

Craig Silverstein
Director of Technology

craig silversteinCraig Silverstein is currently on leave from Stanford University, where he is pursuing a Ph.D. in computer science, with a focus on information retrieval and data mining. Silverstein contributed his expertise in compression algorithms to Google while it was still a research project at Stanford. His other academic pursuits include super-efficient versions of basic data structures such as hash tables as well as efficient clustering of large data sets using Scatter/Gather and latent semantic indexing as it relates to clustering, which he explored at Xerox PARC.

Silverstein graduated with honors with a bachelor's degree in computer science from Harvard College, from which he also received Phi Beta Kappa distinction, the Microsoft Technical Scholarship, and twice received the Derek Bok Award for Teaching Excellence. He was the first employee hired at Google by the company's founders.

In addition to supplying technical guidance, Silverstein provides Googlers their daily bread, employing three baking machines running in parallel mode on a Linux operating system.

Cindy McCaffrey
Vice President, Corporate Marketing

cindy mccaffreyCindy McCaffrey has 20 years of experience in public relations, investor relations, marketing communications, employee and customer communications, and reporting and editing. Prior to joining Google, McCaffrey led domestic and international corporate communications activities at several of Silicon Valley's highest profile companies, including Apple Computer, E*TRADE, The 3DO Company, and SmartForce (formerly CBT Systems).

McCaffrey graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in journalism from the University of Nebraska, and pursued graduate studies in American Literature at Southwest Missouri State University. She began her career as a reporter and editor at daily newspapers, including The Omaha World-Herald; the Springfield (Mo.) Leader & Press; the Kansas City Business Journal; and The Contra Costa Times; and at high-tech trade publications, including Macintosh Today. She has committed to memory the entire text of Strunk and White's The Elements of Style.

Google Inc. Board of Directors

Dr. Eric E. Schmidt, Chairman and CEO

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin recruited Eric Schmidt from Novell, where he led that company's strategic planning, management and technology development as chairman and CEO. Schmidt's Novell experience culminated a 20-year record of achievement as an Internet strategist, entrepreneur and developer of great technologies. Schmidt's well-seasoned perspective perfectly complements Google's needs as a young and rapidly growing search engine with a unique corporate culture.

Prior to his appointment at Novell, Schmidt was chief technology officer and corporate executive officer at Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he led the development of Java, Sun's platform-independent programming technology, and defined Sun's Internet software strategy. Before joining Sun in 1983, Schmidt was a member of the research staff at the Computer Science Lab at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), and held positions at Bell Laboratories and Zilog. Schmidt has a BS in electrical engineering from Princeton University, and an MS and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California-Berkeley.

Schmidt is an avid pilot and political junkie who never tires of debating the great issues of our day and the relative merits of small plane jet propulsion systems.

Sergey Brin, Google Inc.

Sergey Brin, a native of Moscow, received a bachelor of science degree with honors in mathematics and computer science from the University of Maryland at College Park. He is currently on leave from the Ph.D. program in computer science at Stanford University, where he received his master's degree. Sergey, 28, is a recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. It was at Stanford he met Larry Page and worked on the project that became Google. Together they founded Google, Inc. in 1998.

Brin's research interests include search engines, information extraction from unstructured sources, and data mining of large text collections and scientific data. He has published more than a dozen publications in leading academic journals, including Extracting Patterns and Relations from the World Wide Web; Dynamic Data Mining: A New Architecture for Data with High Dimensionality, which he published with Larry Page; Scalable Techniques for Mining Casual Structures; Dynamic Itemset Counting and Implication Rules for Market Basket Data; and Beyond Market Baskets: Generalizing Association Rules to Correlations.

Brin has been a featured speaker at a number of national and international academic, business and technology forums including the Academy of American Achievement; European Technology Forum; Technology, Entertainment and Design; and Silicon Alley 2001. When not juggling his many responsibilities as company president, Brin studies the trapeze and scuba diving and participates enthusiastically in parking lot roller hockey games with other Googlers.

John Doerr, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers

John Doerr serves on the privately held company boards of Google, Good Technology, Elance and MyCFO. He also serves on the board of directors of Intuit, Amazon.com, Homestore.com, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Handspring, Freemarkets and Sun Microsystems. Doerr was the founding CEO of Silicon Compilers and co-founder of @Home Network. He joined Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in 1980 and sponsored a series of investments including, Compaq, Cypress, Intuit, Macromedia, Netscape, Lotus, Millennium Pharamceuticals, S3, Sun Microsystems, Amazon.com, and Symantec.

Prior to joining Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Doerr was at Intel where he held various engineering, marketing and management assignments, and was one of their top-ranked sales executives. He holds patents for computer memory devices he invented as a design engineer at Monsanto. Recent interests include education, the Internet and biotechnology genomics.

Michael Moritz, Sequoia Capital

Michael Moritz focuses on information technology investments. He is currently a director of Flextronics (FLEX), Google, PayPal, RedEnvelope, Saba Software (SABA), Shockwave and Yahoo! (YHOO). He previously was a founding director of Agile Software (AGIL), Global Center (acquired by Frontier Corp (FRO), LinkExchange (acquired by Microsoft, MSFT), eGroups (acquired by Yahoo!), NeoMagic (NMGC), Quote.Com (acquired by Lycos (TRLY), and Visigenic (acquired by Borland). Before joining Sequoia Capital in 1986, Moritz worked in a variety of positions at Time Warner and was a founder of Technologic Partners.

Larry Page, Google Inc.

Larry Page was Google's founding CEO and grew the company to more than 200 employees and profitability before moving into his new role in April 2001. The son of Michigan State University computer science professor Dr. Carl Victor Page, Larry's love of computers began at age six. While following in his father's footsteps in academics, Larry became an honors graduate from cross-state rival the University of Michigan, where he earned a bachelor's of science in engineering degree, with a concentration on computer engineering. During his time in Ann Arbor, Page received numerous leadership awards for his efforts towardimproving the College of Engineering, served as president of the University's Eta Kappa Nu Honor Society and built a programmable plotter and inkjet printer out of Legos™.

Page, 29, met Sergey Brin while they were both Ph.D. candidates in computer science at Stanford University. In 1995 they started work on the research that led to Google. Together, they developed and ran Google, which began operating in 1998. The first paper they authored on Google, "The Anatomy of a Large Scale Hypertextual Search Engine," is now the 10th most accessed paper of all time according to the main computer science bibliography server.

Page has discussed business and technology on national broadcast programs including CNNfn and the Charlie Rose Show and as a speaker at numerous national and international forums, including The Churchill Club, the Wall Street Journal Technology Summit, The Commonwealth Club, Technologic Partners and PC Forum. He is a member of the National Advisory Committee (NAC) for the University of Michigan College of Engineering.

Ram Shriram

Ram Shriram was vice president of business development at Amazon.com, reporting to Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO. During Shriram's tenure at Amazon.com he grew the customer count from 3 million to 11 million users. Prior to Amazon.com, Shriram was CEO of Junglee Corp., a company that Amazon acquired in 1998. Before joining Junglee, Shriram was an early member of the Netscape Communications executive team. He initiated and built relationships with a targeted set of partners worldwide, helping Netscape to build market share and revenue momentum.

In 1996, Shriram crafted Netscape's indirect channels of distribution worldwide, and managed several hundred people with 16 direct reports across three continents (North America, Europe, and Asia ), producing well over half of Netscape's $346 million annual revenue. A year later, Shriram oversaw the OEM and website sales functions at Netscape, and helped generate more than $100 million in revenue from Netscape's high-traffic website alone. Shriram also serves on the board of Yodlee.com and Elance.com, and is a leading angel investor in Silicon Valley.

Google Inc. Technical Advisory Council

Jakob Nielsen, Nielsen Norman Group

Jakob Nielsen, Ph.D., is a User Advocate and principal of the Nielsen Norman Group, which he co-founded with Donald A. Norman, author and former vice president of research at Apple Computer. Until 1998, Nielsen was a Sun Microsystems Distinguished Engineer and the company's web usability guru. Nielsen coined the term "discount usability engineering" and has invented several usability techniques for fast and inexpensive improvements of user interfaces, including heuristic evaluation. He holds 35 United States patents, mainly on ways of making the Internet easier to use. Nielsen is the author of numerous books, papers, technical reports and tutorials. His columns include UseIt.com's bi-weekly Alertbox on web usability, the Users First! column on the Ziff-Davis Network, and Deconstructing, which features famous websites in Internet World.

Rajeev Motwani, Professor, Stanford University

Rajeev Motwani is a professor of computer science at Stanford University, where he also serves as director of graduate studies. He obtained his Ph.D. in computer science from University of California, Berkeley in 1988. Motwani is well-known for his research on databases and data mining, web search and information retrieval, robotics, computational drug design, and theoretical computer science. He is the author of two widely-regarded books -- Randomized Algorithms published by Cambridge University Press and an undergraduate textbook published by Addison-Wesley. As a tribute to his work, Motwani has received the Godel Prize, the Okawa Foundation Research Award, the Arthur Sloan Research Fellowship, the National Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, the Bergmann Memorial Award from the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation, and an IBM Faculty Award. He serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Computer and System Sciences, and the SIAM Journal on Computing. He is a member of various corporate and technical advisory boards, and is a charter member of TIE (The IndUS Entrepreneurs).

Jeffrey Ullman, Professor, Stanford University

Jeffrey Ullman is the S.W. Ascherman Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. His interests include database theory, database integration, data mining, and education using the information infrastructure. Previously, Ullman was a professor at Princeton University and a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey. He received his bachelor of science degree in engineering mathematics from Columbia University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1966. In recognition of his research, Ullman has been the recipient of the Einstein Fellowship from the Israeli Academy of Sciences and a Guggenheim Fellowship; in 1989, he was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering.
Ullman has sat on the board of Junglee Corp. and authored or co-authored 16 books and 170 technical publications, including, Database System Implementation (with H. Garcia-Molina and J. Widom).

Terry Winograd, Professor, Stanford University

Terry Winograd is a professor in computer science at Stanford University, where he is developing teaching programs in human-computer interaction design. He is world-renowned for his work on designing effective interactive user experiences and focuses on developing the theoretical background and conceptual models for designing human-computer interaction. Winograd is a founder of Action Technologies and a regular consultant to Interval Research. In addition, he serves on the national advisory board of the Association for Software Design and a number of journal editorial boards, including the Journal of Human Computer Interaction, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Personal Technologies, and Informatica.

In 1966, Winograd received his bachelor of science degree in mathematics from The Colorado College. He completed his Ph.D. in applied mathematics at MIT. His book, Understanding Computers and Cognition, was named "Best Information Science Book of 1987" by the American Society for Information Science.