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 MUSIC : CD REVIEWS : Bad Religion EMAIL 





Bad Religion The Process of Belief


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Bad Religion




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TRIVIA:
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 what's the name of bad religion second album?

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Bad Religion - the L.A. band that was a catalyst of the Eighties punk revival - have re-formed to record The Process of Belief, fourteen throttling songs designed to remind Sum 41's worshippers about the oft-neglected cerebral side of punk. Working that old, reliable combination of buzz-saw guitars and shouted, instantly memorable melodies, the songwriting team of singer Greg Graffin and guitarist Brett Gurewitz strives to jolt listeners into awareness of the world around them, covering classic punk ground about the voided-out values of consumer culture and the numbness of the age. Their songs may not be elegant - many adhere to the same hyperfast tempo and rely on too-familiar guitar riffage. But the best of them compress provocative ideas about self-esteem, fate and personal responsibility into brash, blistering, exceedingly tuneful polemics: "Supersonic," for example, uses pure delirious speed to lament the frenzy of modern urban life. When things get overwhelming, Graffin sings in the chorus, there's always the quintessential punk response: "I just accelerate into oblivion."

TOM MOON
(RS 889 - February 14, 2002)



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 Author: nokittageorgychamber

Number 7 of 7





Subject: BAD ASS!
Rating: 3.5 | Somewhat Disagreed with the RS Review
Date: 3/15/2002 10:56:06 PM

THIS WAS PRETTY MUCH A GOOD CD. I LIKED MOST OF THE SONGS.


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 Author: vortex16

Number 6 of 7





Subject: Bad Religion; Process of Belief is great!
Rating: 4.5 |
Date: 3/9/2002 6:25:08 PM

Two years ago, Bad Religion decided to step away from their hardcore punk roots and go with the lighter sound of The New America. Maybe they needed to, as their 1998 release No Substance was considered to be a disappointment by fans and critics alike. But somehow, someway they got that creative power and fire back for their new record The Process of Belief. This is raw punk energy in it's purest form and age seems to do nothing to these guys but make them a little wiser. "Supersonic" opens the record with a great chorus and blistering speed to get you going and this little devil doesn't stop there. "Broken" and "Sorrow" sound nothing like the band has produced before, in fact it sounds (dare I say) slower. But don't be fooled and don't think for a second that these guys are going soft. This just adds some variety to the album and that's a good thing. But for the Bad Religion you know and love check "Can't Stop It", "Materialist" and "The Defense". The only quibble that I have is the song "Kyoto Now!" It doesn't have much spice and sounds like an everyday punk song. But this is a high voltage, headphone busting album and if you have ever had even the slightest bit of interest in this band you need this album.


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 Author: rwroark13

Number 5 of 7





Subject: Rolling Stone Needs Writers With Taste and Know What they Are Talking About
Rating: 5 | Disagreed with the RS Review
Date: 2/5/2002 9:08:03 PM

Bad Religion�The Process of Belief by: Ross Whitsett Coming at you like a baseball bat to the back of the head, Bad Religion have returned to Epitaph records with Brett Gurewitz back in the band full time in their latest effort The Process of Belief. Here are the survivors of eighties SoCal Punk, showing all the rip-offs�and there have been so many from Green Day to Blink 182 and any other commercial band that have no talent and are clueless to the idea that music could actually mean something�how to do it right. Unlike the pointless drivel that comes out of the latter�s mouths or the wretchedly depressing poetry of say, Aaron Lewis from Stain�so you�re pathetic and want to die, don�t whine about it and act like I should care�Greg Graffin and the boys have put together an adrenaline rush of classic punk�each song is short and to the point. Right away �Supersonic� declares that this will be a fast paced album that has feeling and a point to it, "I just want to live decently, meaningfully.� �Prove It� is a declaration that you are good enough and, �there�s no proof necessary, it�s only in your mind.� By the fourth track the listener will be set and excited by the notion they are listening to something worthwhile. �Broken� could be Bad Religion�s first top single, if people have the courage to air it, because it has everything that every horrible alternative song that was popular wishes it could have, emotion and depth. The song transitions in the verses from a straight rock riff to punk chords in the chorus, over this Graffin tells you while one may be �choking on reality� they are �still not broken� because, �there is no such thing as human debris.� Then they move into a quick shot at anyone that, �consents to ignorance and fear�, in �Destined For Nothing�, when they remind us that, �there ain�t no destiny for you and me.� By the eighth track, you are in shock form listening to such a work of art, and we are given �Sorrow�, Graffin�s own version of Lennon�s �Imagine�, shouting that, �if every living soul could be upright and strong...there will be sorrow, no more.� The album builds up in the second half, speaking of the �fallacy of epiphany�, asking �why do you lie? would you betray your soul?�, and finally ending with �Bored and Extremely Dangerous� where Greg ends by singing something that all could relate to, �If only someone would listen to me.� Much like last fall�s Fugazi effort, The Argument, as empowering as Process is, it resonates with melancholia and hollowness in its message. Its not uplifting to say the least, only, it gives creed to the idea that it is absurd to be self-loathing. Ultimately however, this is the one flaw in the album, it can leave the listener as what is spoken of in the last track, �bored to the extreme with nothing better to do.� The album constantly preaches against desperation and you truly feel the passion these men put into the work, with the dichotomy of soaring harmonies�their unprecedented characteristic that sets them part from most other punk bands where the singers don�t have good voices, however it usually doesn�t matter�with the volatile guitars. Graffin speaks of rejected love not from individuals but from existence altogether and the world we live in today. It is an album on the human condition and the main critique Bad Religion is expressing here is on those that don�t understand what that means. Greg doesn�t plead for change from those that don�t understand, but preaches to the few remaining human beings left.


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