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GWINNETT WEDNESDAY • August 28, 2002

Two bullets struck Duluth police officer
At least 1 was 'friendly fire'
Beth Warren - Staff
Wednesday, August 28, 2002

Officer Jill Manders was struck by two bullets during Thursday's neighborhood shootout between police and a resident, Duluth police Chief Randy Belcher said Tuesday.

Now police must determine if both shots came from the same gun.

At least one of those shots was a 5.7x28mm bullet from a pistol carried by Duluth police supervisors, Gwinnett District Attorney Danny Porter said.

"That's hard on everybody," Belcher said. "There's no way to actually tell yet. . . . Until the ballistic tests are done, it's kind of a guessing game."

Duluth police supervisors carry Five-seveN pistols, which use bullets that can penetrate Kevlar helmets and bullet-resistant vests, according to the gun manufacturer's Web site.

Suspect Roman Khaimov, 38, who had fired several rounds at police with a .357-caliber revolver, died in his Benthollow Lane garage after being shot several times by police, Porter said.

Manders was struck by "friendly fire" from her position outside of the suspect's house, Porter said. He said she was next to a fence in an adjoining yard.

A bullet tore through her right calf, while a second shot grazed her left thigh, the chief said. She was treated at an area hospital and is recovering at home.

Manders, an eight-year police veteran, hasn't been given the OK by doctors to return to work, but she may be able to return in a week or two, Belcher said.

The incident began at W.P. Jones Park, adjacent to a Duluth police station, when Khaimov pulled his car next to a car driven by his estranged wife, Inna Savinova, and fired into her window, police said. Khaimov then drove away.

Savinova feared she might have been shot after seeing blood on her arms and face. She rushed to flag down a Duluth officer.

The chief helped assess Savinova's injuries, realizing she had been injured by glass from the shattered car window. Meanwhile, officers rushed to Khaimov's neighborhood, the Grove Park subdivision, off Pleasant Hill Road.

From inside his home, Khaimov traded heavy gunfire with police for at least half an hour while neighbors took cover inside their homes.

A team of officers had knocked on back doors of area homes to see if residents wanted to evacuate during the standoff.

Bullets peppered houses, fences and yards on nine properties, Porter said.

It was the first incident in at least 26 years in which a Duluth officer has discharged a weapon in the line of duty, Belcher said.

"It's just an unfortunate situation that took place," the chief said. "The officers who responded took what actions they thought were necessary at the time. My heart goes out to the officers that were involved and to the family" of Khaimov.

Family and friends of Khaimov said he had been suffering from depression.

Gwinnett County police detectives are investigating the incident and will forward a report of their findings to Porter for review. Porter refused to discuss other details, including how many shots were fired and how many times Khaimov was struck.

 

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