Ballot Access News -- August 1, 2000

Volume 16, Number 5

This issue was originally printed on white paper.

Table of Contents
  1. LANDMARK RULING PROTECTING WRITE-IN VOTES
  2. NADER SUES 2 MORE STATES OVER DEADLINE
  3. OKLAHOMA LIBERTARIANS LOSE PRIMARY CASE
  4. CONGRESSMAN TACKLES DEBATES ISSUE
  5. INSTANT-RUNOFF VOTING GAINS IN BRITAIN
  6. PUERTO RICO ACCESS
  7. ARIZONA VICTORY
  8. HOPEFUL OREGON CASE
  9. MAJOR PARTIES DROP WASHINGTON PRIMARY
  10. TEXAS LAWSUIT GAINS
  11. BUCHANAN DEBATE CASE
  12. GEORGIA SENATE RACE
  13. MASSACHUSETTS VICTORY
  14. JUSTICE STEVENS' ERROR
  15. CONGRESSIONAL PAY
  16. OTHER LAWSUIT NEWS
  17. LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  18. US CRITICIZES AZERBAIJAN FOR EARLY FILING DEADLINES!
  19. PERILS OF NOT VOTING
  20. YOUR HELP NEEDED
  21. REFORM, LIBERTARIAN PARTIES FEAR DISUNITY
  22. PARTY REVENUE FROM STATE INCOME TAX "CHECK-OFF" (table)
  23. REFORM PARTY PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY BALLOT
  24. LIBERTARIAN CONVENTION VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT (table)
  25. 2000 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT (table)
  26. VERMONT PROGRESSIVES NOMINATE NADER
  27. MATCHING FUNDS
  28. NATIONAL PARTIES NOT ON CHART
  29. MOUNTAIN PARTY ON IN WEST VIRGINIA
  30. NATURAL LAW CONVENTION
  31. LIBERTY UNION CHOOSES McREYNOLDS
  32. INCLUSIVE POLLS
  33. Subscription Information

LANDMARK RULING PROTECTING WRITE-IN VOTES

NEW JERSEY SUPREME COURT ORDERS CLEAR INSTRUCTIONS

On June 30, the New Jersey Supreme Court unanimously reversed the State Court of Appeals, and ordered a new election for Mayor and Borough Council in Chesilhurst, because instructions for write-in voting had been so unclear. Petition of Gray-Sadler, A-97-99.

At the November 1999 election, the incumbent Mayor and Councilmen of Chesilhurst were unopposed on the ballot. However, a write-in slate had campaigned vigorously. The official vote for Mayor was incumbent Arland Poindexter 172; write-in candidate Kati Gray-Sandler, 154. Gray-Sandler and her running mates sued. The trial forced an examination of the paper rolls in the voting machine, which showed another 21 write-ins for Gray-Sandler which had not been counted because they had been placed in the wrong location. Also, some voters testified that they had desired to cast a write-in vote, but the instructions were so inadequate, they were unable to do so.

The trial court had ordered a new election, but the State Court of Appeals had reversed that. The Supreme Court has now reversed the State Court of Appeals, and ordered a new election in September.

The Supreme Court found that the instructions for casting a write-in vote were so murky, it was not surprising that many of the write-ins had been cast in the wrong place. It said, "In all future elections throughout the state, explicit instructions on how to cast a write-in vote must be provided with the sample ballots... Similarly clear and informative instructions must be provided at the polling place... As a general rule, any of the instructions contained inside the voting machines should be displayed outside the voting machines so that voters have an opportunity to read the instructions in advance and pose any question they may have to the election officials."

The court quoted the U.S. Supreme Court: "A citizen's constitutional right to vote for the candidate of his or her choice necessarily includes the corollary right to have that vote counted."

The decision will be useful this fall against states such as Pennsylvania, where the law says all write-ins must be counted and canvassed, yet where this law is routinely disregarded. At the November 1996 election, Pennsylvania elections officials did provide a state tally of write-ins for Ralph Nader, but this year they say they won't repeat such a "favor" for any write-in presidential candidates.


NADER SUES 2 MORE STATES OVER DEADLINE

On July 20, Ralph Nader filed a federal lawsuit against the Illinois petition deadline of June 26. Nader 2000 v Illinois State Board of Elections, 00-cv-4401, n.d. The case was assigned to Judge William Hibbler, a Clinton appointee.

On July 28, he filed a similar lawsuit against the South Dakota independent candidate petition deadline of June 20. Nader 2000 v Hazeltine. John Hagelin expects to join the case.

The Nader lawsuit against North Carolina's May petition deadline for new parties had a hearing in federal court at 9:30 a.m. on July 31. A decision is expected at any time.

The lawsuits are all based on Anderson v Celebrezze, a 1983 U.S. Supreme Court decision which said that early petition deadlines for independent and minor party presidential candidates are unconstitutional. Nader needed to file these lawsuits because he didn't get enough signatures in those states by the deadlines. He is continuing to collect signatures in those states. He may file a similar lawsuit against Oklahoma, another state in which his petition wasn't finished in time.


OKLAHOMA LIBERTARIANS LOSE PRIMARY CASE

On July 24, U.S. District Court Judge Tim Leonard refused to force the Oklahoma Election Board to let any registered voter vote in the Libertarian Party primary. Beaver v Ward, civ-00-1071-L. The judge said that state law, which lets a party decide for itself whether to let independent voters into its primary, but which doesn't give it the right to invite members of other parties into its primary, is probably valid.

Judge Leonard's order does not even mention the June 2000 U.S. Supreme Court opinion California Democratic Party v Jones, which seemed to say that parties have a First Amendment right to decide for themselves, who votes in their primaries. The judge, a Bush appointee, said letting Republicans and Democrats vote in the Libertarian Party primary would harm the major parties. He also said that, since precinct officials for the upcoming August primary have already been trained, there would be no good opportunity to teach them how to handle something new.

The party wanted all voters to be able to vote in its primary, because it felt that this would be a good way to get more voter support. The party will not appeal the denial of an injunction, but will try again to persuade the Judge that the law is unconstitutional.


CONGRESSMAN TACKLES DEBATES ISSUE

On July 18, Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr., of Chicago, introduced Concurrent Resolution 373, which calls on the Commission on Presidential Debates to change its criteria from 15% standing in the polls, to 5%. He is seeking co-sponsors. Please ask your member of the U.S. House to sign on.


INSTANT-RUNOFF VOTING GAINS IN BRITAIN

The London Times of June 29 reports that Prime Minister Tony Blair will soon recommend Instant Runoff Voting for Parliamentary elections. However, he will not support proportional representation. Instant Runoff Voting lets voters put a "one" next to a favorite candidate, and a "two" next to the voter's next-favored candidate. If the favored candidate is eliminated in the first round of counting, the voter's ballot is then transferred to the second-place choice.


PUERTO RICO ACCESS

On July 21, the Civil Action Party of Puerto Rico asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear its ballot access appeal. Partido Accion Civil v Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, no. 00-124. Puerto Rico requires new parties to submit a petition signed by 5% of the last vote cast. Each signature must be notarized. Only attorneys can do the notarization work, and they cannot be paid more than $1 per signature. Since this law has been in effect, only one party has ever complied with the requirement. Yet the Puerto Rico Supreme Court upheld it, earlier this year. The party is seeking other organizations to file amici briefs on its behalf.


ARIZONA VICTORY

On July 21, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled that independent voters may sign petitions to put candidates on primary ballots. Ahearn v Kennedy, cv-00-12165. As a result, a Democrat was restored to the September 2000 Democratic primary for Corporation Commissioner.

The election code is internally contradictory. One law says anyone who is entitled to vote in a primary is entitled to sign a petition for a candidate in that party's primary. Another law says only party members may sign. The Court said since the law is contradicts itself, the conflict would be resolved in favor of voter choice. The Democratic Party expressed no opinion or preference (a new Arizona law, which hadn't yet gone into effect, says that any registered voter may sign any primary petition; this lawsuit only dealt with the old law).


HOPEFUL OREGON CASE

On June 30, an Oregon State Court Judge ruled that if the state is going to transfer voters into an "inactive" file, and then refuse to count their signatures on initiative petitions, then at least it must notify all such voters that they can no longer sign petitions. In the meantime, their signatures do count on petitions. McIntire v Bradbury, A6-6252, Multnomah Co. Circuit Court.

Oregon puts voters into an inactive file if they appear to have moved and have not re-registered at the new address. The 1993 federal "Motor Voter" law forbids this, but the Court ruled that the "Motor Voter" law only affects federal elections, so it is no help for initiatives. Oregon activists hope that the state, faced with the bother of sending notices to each person in the inactive file (telling them that they can no longer sign initiative petitions), may change its policy and let "inactive" voters sign all petitions.


MAJOR PARTIES DROP WASHINGTON PRIMARY

On July 20, the Democratic Party of Washington state filed a federal lawsuit to escape that state's "blanket" primary. The next day, the case was settled when both major parties and the Secretary of State signed a stipulation, ending the blanket primary after January, 2001. The major parties are the only parties entitled to choose their nominees by primary (other parties nominate by convention). Washington Democratic Party v Munro, 00-5419-FDB.

The parties agreed to keep the blanket primary for this year. The case remains open, and if the legislature doesn't pass a law next year for a different kind of primary, the court, state elections officials, and the major parties, will design a closed primary.

The case was settled quickly because of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in June, Calif. Democratic Party v Jones. It said that parties cannot be forced to use blanket primaries. The only remaining major party that likes blanket primaries is the Alaska Democratic Party.


TEXAS LAWSUIT GAINS

Texas currently provides that a party which is not qualified statewide, may nevertheless qualify in a single county, and run candidates for county office. However, the state won't let a party which is not qualified statewide, get on the ballot in just a single U.S. House seat, or in a single legislative race.

Last September, U.S. District Court Judge Sam Sparks upheld that policy. However, on June 28, the U.S. Court of Appeals told him to re-think his decision. The 5th circuit said Judge Sparks had concluded that the state had a compelling reason for its policy, but that he didn't say what that compelling reason is. Therefore, he must re-write his decision.


BUCHANAN DEBATE CASE

On July 25, Pat Buchanan filed a lawsuit in federal court in Washington, D.C., against the FEC, to force it to follow its own regulations which forbid corporate donations to federal candidates. The lawsuit argues that the Commission on Presidential Debates is not non-partisan, and therefore corporate contributions to it are illegal. Buchanan v FEC, 1:cv-00-1775. The case was assigned to Judge Ellen Huvelle, a Clinton appointee who also has Hagelin's case.

There are now four lawsuits pending in federal courts on the presidential debates issue: this one; one filed in the same court in 1996 by John Hagelin; one filed in New York by The New York Independence Party and the Constitution Party; and one filed in Boston by Ralph Nader.


GEORGIA SENATE RACE

Georgia will hold a special election to fill a vacant U.S. Senate seat on November 7, 2000. The election will be non-partisan, since all special elections in Georgia are non-partisan. Anyone can get on the ballot by either paying $4,101, or filing 9,528 signatures. The Secretary of State hasn't announced the petitioning period yet. If the period is too short, the state may be forced to reduce the number of signatures, under a 1982 precedent of the Eleventh Circuit called Citizens Party v Poythress.


MASSACHUSETTS VICTORY

On July 18, the Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled that petitions are not invalid, just because they were photocopied so that the reverse side is upside down, relative to the front side. Robinson v State Ballot Law Commission, no. 8344. Last year the same court had ruled that stray graffiti and doodles on a petition sheet make the sheet invalid, so this decision is an improvement from last year's draconian rule. The new theory is that alterations are only fatal, if the effect of the alteration is to change the information that a potential signer would see, while he or she is deciding whether to sign the petition.

As a result of the ruling, Jack Robinson was restored to the Republican primary ballot for U.S. Senate.


JUSTICE STEVENS' ERROR

The July 1 B.A.N. reported that Justice John Stevens said in Calif. Democratic Party v Jones that the California blanket primary is void for federal elections, because it was adopted by an initiative, instead of by the legislature. Article I of the Constitution gives "state legislatures" the power to write election laws for federal office. Stevens read that to mean that the voters (acting via the initiative process) can't write election laws for federal office. He said this is a tentative conclusion, since he hadn't had a chance to fully research it.

However, the U.S. Supreme Court already settled this issue, back in 1916. Ohio ex rel Davis v Hildebrant said that the reference to "state legislatures" in Article I refers to all the legislative powers of a state: it includes not only acts of the legislature, but also laws passed by initiative. The 1916 case was about whether an initiative, changing Ohio's U.S. House district boundaries, was constitutional. The Court upheld that initiative.


CONGRESSIONAL PAY

Congress is increasing its own pay by $3,800 per year, which will raise filing fees in the states in which fees are based on a percentage of salary. The Florida fee will rise to $8,706.


OTHER LAWSUIT NEWS

1. federal law: on May 18, the 3rd circuit upheld a federal law which bans direct corporate contributions to candidates for congress. Mariani v FEC, 212 F 3d 761.

2. Alaska: on July 13, a supporter of Pat Buchanan filed a lawsuit in state court, alleging that the Reform Party's private mail-in presidential primary violates state law. Lamb v Hagelin, 3-AN-00-8649.

3. Arizona: on July 26, the Arizona Libertarian Party, Inc. (the Tucson faction) filed a lawsuit to force all the counties to include the office of "precinct committeeman" on the party's September primary ballot. A previous court ruling said that a qualified party must elect these officers, yet some counties of the state won't print that office on the Libertarian primary ballot. Konikov v Santa Cruz Co. Bd. of Supervisors, Santa Cruz Co. Superior Court.

4. California: three Republican legislative candidates who lost the March primary, but who would have won if that primary had been closed, have filed a federal lawsuit to demand that they be declared the nominees. Lorinzce v Jones, 00-cv-1520, e.d. The case went to Judge David Levi, who had upheld the blanket primary in 1997. The hearing is August 4.

5. California (2): the state has asked for a rehearing in Schaefer v Townsend, the 9th circuit case over whether candidates for Congress must be registered voters.

6. Colorado: initiative supporters have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear their appeal against a Colorado law which requires all initiatives to deal only with a single subject. The law, which is ambiguous, has been applied extremely restrictively in recent years. Campbell v Davidson, 99-2015.

7. Louisiana: on July 31, an independent candidate for the U.S. House filed a federal lawsuit against the law which prevents her from having any label next to her name on the ballot; not even the word "independent" is permitted. Rosenthal v McKeithen.

8. Michigan: on July 25, a lawsuit was filed to overturn a campaign finance law which requires candidates for state office to sign under penalty of perjury that they have filed all required campaign finance reports. The party argues that the law criminalizes potential inadvertent mistakes. Michigan Libertarian Party v Secretary of State, 00-92155-AW, Ingham Co. Circuit Court.

9. Pennsylvania: on July 24, the Green Party filed a federal lawsuit against mandatory filing fees. Back in 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court said there must be an alternative to filing fees, at least for paupers, but Pennsylvania has no such alternative. Filing fees range up to $200. Belitskus v Pizzingrilli, 3:cv-00-1300.

10. South Dakota: there will be a hearing August 8 in Libertarian Party of S.D. v Hazeltine, over the law that requires a statewide candidate of a new party to submit 250 signatures of party members, to get on that party's primary ballot.

11. Virginia: on July 17, a federal judge upheld a law which requires that statewide petitions contain 400 signatures from each congressional district. Wood v Quinn, 3:00cv335.


LEGISLATIVE NEWS

1. California: SB 28 says that any party may decide for itself, whether to let independent voters vote in its primary. It has passed the Senate and is pending in the Assembly Elections Committee. Ever since 1986, parties have had this right, but it will be more orderly to have it in the law.

2. California (2): Governor Gray Davis signed SB 917 on July 21. It repeals a law that the names and wages paid to petition circulators must be reported publicly.

3. South Carolina: HB3786 was amended to provide that qualified parties have until August 30 to certify the names of their presidential and vice-presidential candidates. The earlier version of the bill had set August 15, but then it was realized that the Democratic Party would be unable to comply, since its convention ends on August 16.


US CRITICIZES AZERBAIJAN FOR EARLY FILING DEADLINES!

According to the BBC World Service, on July 25, the U.S. State Department condemned Azerbaijan because its election law bans parties from the ballot if they did not register at least six months before an election. Philip Reeker was the U.S. State Department spokesman who voiced the complaint.

California bans parties from the ballot unless they qualify 13 months before any general election, and Ohio bans them unless they qualify 12 months before an election.


PERILS OF NOT VOTING

At the Maine primary election on June 13, Green candidate David Palmer was unopposed for his party's nomination for State Representative, 37th district. He had already qualified for public campaign funds of $3,200, to be spent in the general election.

Unfortunately, he didn't bother to vote on primary day. No one else voted for him either, even though his name was on the ballot. The Secretary of State then ruled that he was not nominated at the primary. His name will not appear on the November ballot, and he must return the campaign funds.


YOUR HELP NEEDED

Sociology professor Sa'ad Eddin Ibrahim of the American University in Cairo, who holds dual Egyptian--U.S. citizenship, has been imprisoned in Egypt since June 30. He specializes in the study of political behavior, and he has been outspoken against his country's suppression of free elections. His colleagues from many countries are asking for letters of support for him. The Egyptian Ambassador to the U.S. is Ambassador Nabil Fahmy, Embassy of Egypt, 3521 International Court, NW, Washington DC 20008. Professor Ibrahim is accused of receiving $220,000 from the European Commission to produce a documentary about Egypt's election process, which will "harm Egypt's reputation".


REFORM, LIBERTARIAN PARTIES FEAR DISUNITY

In the United States, parties nominate presidential candidates at national conventions. However, the choice of any party's national convention for president is not legally binding. Due to Constitutional procedures for electing a president, and the tradition that all ballot access laws (even for federal office) are written by state governments, the state parties always have the power to determine which presidential candidate to list in their own state. Sometimes, the state parties refuse to abide by the results of the national convention.

The Democratic Party has suffered from this form of disunity, in the presidential elections of 1948, 1960, 1964 and 1968. In 1948 the Democratic Parties of Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and South Carolina refused to list Harry Truman on the November ballot. Instead, they listed Strom Thurmond as the Democratic nominee for president. Similar incidents occurred in the 1960's in Alabama and Mississippi. The Republican Party suffered from it in 1912, when the Republican Parties of California and South Dakota listed Theodore Roosevelt, even though the national convention had chosen William Howard Taft. The Socialist Party suffered in 1940 in Connecticut, and the Prohibition Party suffered in 1928 in California, from similar incidents.

This year, the Reform Parties of New York and Connecticut are hinting that they will not place Pat Buchanan on their November ballots, even if Buchanan becomes the national Reform nominee. Similarly, the Arizona Libertarian Party (the Phoenix faction, which is recognized as the legitimate party by the state) may refuse to list Harry Browne on the Arizona November ballot.

Supporters of Buchanan in Connecticut and New York, and supporters of Browne in Arizona, recently launched independent petition campaigns to nominate them in those states, just in case the ballot-qualified parties do indeed refuse to list the national nominees.

The Arizona Browne supporters not only must gather 9,598 valid signatures on an independent petition; they must then also win a lawsuit against Arizona's June 14 deadline. The Connecticut and New York deadlines have not yet passed.

The Arizona Libertarian Party will probably decide whether to list Browne, or someone else, or no one, by August 5. The Connecticut and New York Reformers may not decide until mid-September.

The reasons for the enmity between the New York and Connecticut units of the Reform Party, and Buchanan, have been reported in the news media. Connecticut Reform Party officers always been loyal to Ross Perot, and many Perot supporters have been opposed to Buchanan ever since May, when Buchanan made it clear that his approach to many issues is different from Perot's. Lenora Fulani, who is powerful in the New York party, broke with Buchanan on June 18.

The Arizona Libertarian Party has been unhappy with the national party because the national party recognized the other Arizona faction ("Tucson faction") in January. The national party had conducted a poll of national party members who live in Arizona in November 1999, which was won by the Tucson faction by 251-131.

The Phoenix faction criticizes the methodology of that poll, pointing out that the national dues-paying membership was the wrong group to poll, since only 36% of the national dues-paying party members appear to be registered Libertarians. The Libertarian Party has long used an odd form of dues-paying membership, in which national membership and state membership are distinct, and it is possible for someone to be a national member without being a state member, and vice versa.

Members of both Arizona factions participated in the national convention in Anaheim last month. Members of the Tucson faction were "the" Arizona delegates. Many of the other faction were credentialed as delegates from other states which are sympathetic, and which had vacancies in their delegations.


PARTY REVENUE FROM STATE INCOME TAX "CHECK-OFF" (table)

Dem. Rep. Green Constit'n Lib't. Reform Nat Law other (1) other (2)
Arizona $11,127 $13,650 - - - - - - $3,203 $194 - - - - - - - - -
Idaho $41,357 $56,370 - - - $5,054 $5,231 $3,801 $3,588 - - - - - -
Kentucky $129,894 $84,884 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Maine $6,182 $2,633 $3,589 - - - - - - $291 - - - - - - - - -
Minnesota $261,815 $210,595 $28,275 $12,940 - - - - - - - - - $56,625 $4,200
North Carolina $137,330 $99,879 - - - - - - $2,420 - - - - - - - - - - - -
Ohio $264,766 $264,766 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Rhode Island $27,455 $19,837 - - - - - - - - - $294 - - - $2,210 - - -
Utah $36,817 $50,593 - - - $1,215 $2,170 $474 $383 $3,242 $1,576
Virginia $24,720 $19,464 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
TOTAL $941,463 $822,671 $31,864 $19,209 $13,024 $5,054 $3,971 $62,077 $5,776
PERCENT 49.42% 43.18% 1.67% 1.01% .68% .27% .21% 3.26% .30%

Every year, the ten states mentioned above let taxpayers send a contribution to the political party of the taxpayer's choice. The chart above shows the amounts donated to each political party named on tax forms. The Ohio form only lets a taxpayer decide whether to contribute, but doesn't let him or her choose a party; the money is divided equally among parties which polled 20% for president or Governor at the last election. All the other states mentioned above allow a free choice of party.

The parties in the "Other (1)" column are: Minnesota Independence Party (Governor Ventura's party), the Rhode Island Cool Moose Party, and the Independent American Party of Utah. The parties in the "Other (2)" column are: Progressive Minnesota, Utah Independent Party.


REFORM PARTY PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY BALLOT

[[[PLACE IMAGE HERE]]]

This is a reproduction of the Reform Party presidential primary ballot. Last month, such a ballot was mailed to everyone who asked for one; everyone who is a registered member of the Reform Party; everyone who signed a ballot access petition to put the Reform Party on the ballot; and everyone who signed an independent candidate petition for Pat Buchanan or John Hagelin. The ballots are due by August 9 and the results will be announced at the Reform Party national convention in Long Beach, California, on August 11. Approximately 900,000 ballots were mailed.


LIBERTARIAN CONVENTION VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT (table)

The chart below shows the vote for president and vice-president at the Libertarian Party national convention, Anaheim, California, June 30-July 3. Harry Browne, for president, won on the first ballot. His opponents were Don Gorman of New Hampshire, Jacob Hornberger of Virginia, Barry Hess of Arizona (who polled 53), and Dave Hollis of California (who polled 8). There were 23 votes for "none of the above"; 5 for L. Neil Smith; and 9 scattering votes, including one Virginia vote for George W. Bush. For vice-president, no one got a majority on the first ballot. On the second, Art Olivier, former Mayor of Bellflower, California, was nominated; his chief opponents were Steve Kubby (also of California), and Ken Krawchuk of Pennsylvania. Kubby is well-known as a cancer survivor who depends on medical marijuana, and who is on trial for growing his own marijuana, even though a California initiative decriminalized medical marijuana, prior to his arrest.

STATE PRESIDENT V-P, FIRST VOTE V-P, SECOND VOTE
BROWNE GORMAN HORN. OTHER OLIVIER KUBBY KRAW. OTHER OLIVIER KUBBY
Alabama 5 1 1 0 5 1 0 0 5 1
Alaska 6 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 1 5
Arizona 15 2 3 14 12 8 2 2 14 9
Arkansas 6 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 1 5
California 102 35 23 18 63 62 2 7 82 77
Colorado 19 11 0 0 11 10 0 8 15 10
Connecticut 5 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 4 1
Delaware 1 4 0 0 1 1 2 1 3 2
District of Columbia 0 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 3
Florida 21 0 2 2 8 8 0 4 14 6
Georgia 25 2 0 2 7 15 2 1 12 15
Hawaii 0 3 2 0 1 3 0 1 1 3
Idaho 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Illinois 8 8 9 3 9 9 0 6 9 12
Indiana 13 2 1 0 12 1 1 1 14 0
Iowa 3 2 2 2 4 5 0 0 2 7
Kansas 5 3 0 2 0 10 0 0 0 10
Kentucky 5 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 4 1
Louisiana 9 3 0 2 5 6 0 1 6 4
Maine 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0
Maryland 2 8 1 2 2 2 7 1 1 7
Massachusetts 19 8 1 4 12 11 5 2 16 16
Michigan 19 0 11 10 17 12 6 1 26 10
Minnesota 9 3 6 2 6 6 5 2 14 6
Mississippi 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Missouri 9 6 0 2 6 8 2 1 6 7
Montana 5 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 4 0
Nebraska 3 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3
Nevada 10 5 2 0 15 2 0 0 15 2
New Hampshire 1 3 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 2
New Jersey 7 4 9 1 3 7 3 0 7 7
New Mexico 4 0 2 1 2 5 0 0 3 4
New York 7 5 8 2 6 12 2 1 6 14
North Carolina 10 1 0 0 1 8 1 0 2 7
North Dakota 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Ohio 19 5 3 0 19 4 0 0 20 4
Oklahoma 4 0 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1
Oregon 9 4 0 1 7 4 3 1 8 6
Pennsylvania 2 16 9 7 4 5 18 1 11 10
Rhode Island 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2
South Carolina 10 0 0 0 8 1 0 1 9 1
South Dakota 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1
Tennessee 10 2 2 4 8 8 1 0 10 8
Texas 19 6 6 7 20 10 0 0 21 11
Utah 8 1 0 1 5 3 0 0 5 3
Vermont 6 0 0 0 4 2 0 0 3 3
Virginia 15 2 2 4 7 7 4 4 12 9
Washington 20 4 6 1 13 11 1 1 14 11
West Virginia 6 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 7 0
Wisconsin 3 3 5 2 3 10 0 0 3 8
Wyoming 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 2
TOTAL 493 166 120 98 333 303 70 52 418 338


2000 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT (table)

STATE REQUIREMENTS SIGNATURES COLLECTED DEADLINE
FULL PARTY CAND. LIB'T REFORM NAT LAW CONSTIT'N GREEN
Alabama 39,536 5,000 already on finished finished already on *4,000 Aug 31
Alaska (reg) 6,606 #2,410 already on already on already on *3,600 already on Aug 8
Arizona 13,565 *#9,598 *unclear already on already on too late *already on June 14
Arkansas 21,181 #1,000 already on finished already on already on *finished Aug 1
California (reg) 86,212 149,692 already on already on already on already on already on Aug 10
Colorado (reg) 1,000 #pay fee already on already on already on already on already on July 10
Connecticut no procedure #7,500 *finished *unclear 1,000 *finished already on Aug 9
Delaware (reg) 241 4,819 already on already on already on already on already on Aug 19
D.C. no procedure es. #3,500 *800 0 *2,200 0 already on Aug 15
Florida be organized 82,203 already on already on already on already on already on Sep 1
Georgia 39,094 #39,094 already on *finished *too late *too late *too late Jul 11
Hawaii 602 #3,703 already on already on already on already on already on Sep 7
Idaho 9,835 4,918 already on already on already on already on *2,500 Aug 31
Illinois no procedure #25,000 *already on *already on *already on too late *in court June 26
Indiana no procedure #30,717 already on *finished *finished *too late *finished Jul 17
Iowa no procedure #1,500 *1,000 finished 900 finished *finished Aug 17
Kansas 14,854 5,000 already on already on *finished already on *finished July 31
Kentucky no procedure #5,000 already on already on 1,000 *6,100 *5,700 Aug 30
Louisiana est. (reg) 135,000 #pay fee 916 already on 20 53 114 Sep 5
Maine 21,051 #4,000 *3,500 already on 1,000 *finished already on Aug 8
Maryland 10,000 25,607 already on finished *need 1,500 already on *finished Aug 7
Massachusetts est. (reg) 37,500 #10,000 already on *finished *finished *7,500 *finished July 31
Michigan 30,272 30,272 already on already on already on already on *finished July 19
Minnesota 104,550 #2,000 *1,500 0 0 already on *finished Sep 12
Mississippi be organized #1,000 already on already on already on already on *1,300 Sep 7
Missouri 10,000 10,000 already on already on already on already on *finished July 31
Montana 5,000 #5,000 already on already on already on already on *finished Aug 1
Nebraska 5,453 2,500 already on *6,000 already on *2,300 *6,000 Aug 28
Nevada 4,099 4,099 already on *already on already on already on *already on July 7
New Hampshire 9,827 #3,000 *11,600 *finished *2,200 finished *2,500 Aug 9
New Jersey no procedure #800 *finished finished finished finished already on July 31
New Mexico 2,494 14,964 already on already on already on already on already on Sep 11
New York no procedure #15,000 *6,000 *unclear *0 *2,000 already on Aug 21
North Carolina 51,324 98,062 already on already on *too late *too late *in court June 30
North Dakota 7,000 4,000 *50 already on *200 already on *500 Sep 7
Ohio 33,543 #5,000 already on finished already on finished *finished Aug 23
Oklahoma 43,680 36,202 already on already on disputed *too late *too late July 15
Oregon 16,663 13,755 already on *already on *already on *already on already on Aug 28
Pennsylvania no procedure 21,739 *finished *finished *too late *finished *finished Aug 1
Rhode Island 15,323 #1,000 *finished already on *750 0 *1,500 Sep 7
South Carolina 10,000 10,000 already on already on already on already on probably on July 17
South Dakota 6,505 #2,602 already on already on *in court already on *in court June 20
Tennessee 24,406 25 *50 *already on *finished *finished *already on Aug 17
Texas 37,381 56,117 already on *already on finished too late finished May 30
Utah 2,000 #1,000 already on already on already on already on *need 50 Aug 31
Vermont be organized #1,000 already on *0 already on already on *already on Sep 20
Virginia no procedure #10,000 *18,000 *8,000 *10,000 *11,000 *6,500 Aug 25
Washington no procedure #200 *already on *already on *already on *already on *already on Jul 1
West Virginia no procedure #12,730 already on *finished already on *too late *finished Aug 1
Wisconsin 10,000 #2,000 already on *0 0 already on already on Sep 5
Wyoming 3,485 3,485 already on *already on already on *2,300 *1,000 Aug 28
TOTAL STATES ON *36 *31 *25 *25 *19

"Deadline" is procedure with latest deadline. * -- entry changed since last issue. #candidate procedure allows partisan label. See story below for multi-state parties not listed here. NOTE: Constitution Party is doing an independent petition in Wyoming, and Natural Law is doing the same in Kansas, since their party petition failed. See previous story for explanation of "unclear" in the Libertarian & Reform columns.


VERMONT PROGRESSIVES NOMINATE NADER

On July 9, the Vermont Progressive Party nominated Ralph Nader for president and Winona LaDuke for vice-president. The Vermont Progressive Party is a qualified party in the state, whereas the Green Party is not qualified there.

The Patriot Party of South Carolina is expected to also nominate Nader, at its state convention in Columbia on August 12. The party has applied to change its name back to United Citizens Party, which was its original name when it was formed in 1970. Between 1984 and 1994 it was called the New Alliance Party.


MATCHING FUNDS

The three minor party presidential candidates who have applied for primary season matching funds had received these amounts from the U.S. Treasury, as of June 30: Pat Buchanan $3,852,250; John Hagelin $314,135; Ralph Nader $100,000. Additional amounts to these candidates were announced on July 31, too late to include in this issue. Two other candidates, Harry Browne and Howard Phillips, raised enough money to qualify for primary season matching funds, but don't believe in taking them.


NATIONAL PARTIES NOT ON CHART

Socialist Workers: on in Colorado and Washington; finished in D.C., Florida, Iowa, Minnesota, New Jersey; has 15,000 in New York, 250 in Mississippi, 1,000 in Rhode Island.

Socialist: on in Colorado, Florida, Vermont, and Washington; finished in New Jersey; 850 in Iowa, 1,000 in New York, 350 in Rhode Island, 25 in Tennessee, 50 in Wisconsin.

Grassroots: on in Colorado and Vermont; 1,000 in Minnesota; finished in New Jersey.

Prohibition: on in Colorado; finished in Tennessee.

Workers World: on in Washington; has 1,000 in Wisconsin. The party decided not to complete its petitions in New Jersey and Ohio.


MOUNTAIN PARTY ON IN WEST VIRGINIA

The Mountain Party of West Virginia has gained a place on the ballot for its candidate for Governor, Denise Giardina. She is a well-known author and is expected to poll at least 10% of the vote; if she gets even 1%, the Mountain Party will then be qualified automatically for 2002 and 2004. This is the first time that West Virginia has ever had a party on the ballot which exists only in that state. The Mountain Party is an ardent foe of "mountain-top removal" coal mining.


NATURAL LAW CONVENTION

The Natural Law Party will hold its national convention August 31 to September 2, at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center in Arlington, Virginia. John Hagelin is certain to be nominated for president. Since the basis for Hagelin's primary season matching fund money is that he is seeking the Natural Law (and also Reform) nomination, the late convention date maximizes the period during which Hagelin is eligible for primary season funding.


LIBERTY UNION CHOOSES McREYNOLDS

On July 23, the Liberty Union Party, a qualified party in Vermont, voted to nominate the Socialist Party ticket of David McReynolds for president and Mary Cal Hollis for vp. The Liberty Union Party also supported the Socialist ticket in 1980, 1988 and 1996. In 1992 it supported the New Alliance presidential candidate.


INCLUSIVE POLLS

Rasmussen Poll results released July 26: Bush 45.0%; Gore 34.3%; Nader 3.9%; Buchanan 1.5%; Browne 1.1%; Phillips .1%; some other 3.0%; not sure 11.0%. www.portraitofamerica.com/html/poll-804.html This poll is updated daily.

Zogby Poll results of July 17: Bush 42.5%; Gore 37.4%; Nader 6.0%; Buchanan 2.6%; Browne 1.7%; undecided or other, 9.8%. For later results (posted weekly), see www.zogby.com/features/featuredtables.dbm?ID=8


Ballot Access News. is published by and copyright by Richard Winger ban.AT.igc.org. Note: subscriptions are available!
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Compilation copyright (c) © 2000 Bob Bickford