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Rod Stewart
The Great American Songbook



THE ROLLING STONE REVIEW



Once, Rod Stewart was rock's greatest interpreter of other people's songs -- the Sinatra of his age, somebody who took on Dylan, Motown and a whole lot in between and made it all sound urgent and thrilling and alive. Which is why this collection of fourteen American standards from the Thirties is such a disappointment. In his golden age (which, granted, ended thirty years ago), Stewart sang with great musicians, such as guitarists Jeff Beck and Ron Wood, guys who weren't afraid to make him work. Here, on chestnuts such as "It Had to Be You," "You Go to My Head" and "These Foolish Things," he sings against syrupy, obvious orchestral arrangements, driven by a beat that sometimes seems on the verge of a nap -- all of which encourages Stewart's worst habits: He sounds lazy, glib and uninvolved, just the opposite of when he still mattered.

BILL TONELLI
(RS 908 - October 31, 2002)




Everytime We Say Goodbye - (featuring Dave Koz)

That Old Feeling (featuring Arturo Sandoval)

I'll Be Seeing You

That's All

Where Or When

It Had To Be You

For All We Know

These Foolish Things

Moonglow

The Way You Look Tonight

The Nearness Of You

You Go To My Head

They Can't Take That Away From Me

We'll Be Together Again

The Very Thought Of You

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YOUR REVIEWS


Average User Rating


jleavens writes:

Rating:

Disagreed with the RS Review

It must be great to be a music snob. You can wake up every morning hating everything new, and every new direction that an old artist may choose to take. I was very disappointed by the review of this album. I got this album the other day, and have been dancing around my place to it ever since. I was afraid that it was not going to be very good, but it really is an amazing record. I'm so thankful that Rod continues to do a few things unlike anyone else can......sing a song for the fans, and piss of the critics who continue to stew in their hatred for him. The Faces are dead, get over it. Their records are a good listen, but times change and so do people, and...gasp!....so do musicians. Thanks Rod...I own every one of your albums, and this one will always have a special place in that collection.

{ Oct. 25, 2002 | Post 14 of 14 }

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casino69 writes:

Rating:


Sting, Phil Collins, Elton John, Bob Dylan, David Bowie, Neil Young. What do all of these names have in common? Well they're all names of people who used to be important and musically inovative. Quite matter of factly however songwriters, unlike fine wines, do not improve with age but rather wilt away into soppy balladry and 'interesting' new directions that never bear fruit. Rod in the 70's when he was in the faces was most definately 'in'. But hes long since exited the cool department of the life store and should stop dragging his once proud name through the mud and just be content to churn out his greatest hits in $200 a ticket arena tours. In Rod we trust...not.

{ Oct. 22, 2002 | Post 13 of 14 }

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