lpl logo

Swissair Tragedy


| Home | Front Page News | Community Directory | Subscribe | Classifieds |
| Editorial | About Our Company | Map | Lighthouse Awards | Contact Information | Advertising Rates | Summertime Events |

linelp

| Previous Article | Article Index | Next Article |

Hospitality industry also playing a role



Susan Corkum-Greek
Lighthouse staff

 COUNTY - Emergency personnel weren't the only ones catapulted into action by the crash of Flight 111.

 People in the hospitality industry also responded to the tragedy, quickly compiling an inventory of accommodations available through the region.

 Swissair, owners of the downed jet, and Delta Airlines, which shared the flight out of New York, immediately requested blocks of several hundred rooms to be used by company officials, investigators and family members. The first delegation arrived Thursday afternoon.

 By the time authorities in Halifax contacted the South Shore Tourism Association, around 9:30 a.m. that morning, executive-director Lynne Perry and her staff already had the task well in hand.

 "The thing is we all knew last night, prior to the crash, that Halifax rooms were full," she said Thursday. "So as soon as all (10 South Shore) tourist bureaus opened, I asked the managers to put together a list of all rooms available over the next two days."

 The assignment was later expanded to include rooms available up until September 8. It was completed shortly after noon Thursday and faxed off to Nova Scotia Check-Ins, Tourism Nova Scotia, Tourism Halifax and again, to all of the regional bureaus.

 In the meantime, Mrs. Perry received word that Peggy's Cove, one of the South Shore's biggest tourist attractions, would be closed to the public for at least one week while it serves as the command centre for an investigation into the fatal crash.

 Cpl. Frank Skidmore, spokesman for the Tantallon RCMP detachment, told reporters, "We've restricted the access here simply because this is a small, tight area. Plus, we need (it) operationally. So as long as it takes, we may have to control those who come and go."

 Mrs. Perry said she and her staff re-contacted all of the tourist bureaus, asking them to post signs informing people of the situation. She also contacted the local radio station in an effort to help divert traffic.

 While clearly "a terrible tragedy," Mrs. Perry said she feels the people of Nova Scotia have been "very professional" and "compassionate" in their response to the crash. "And that caring attitude is something that is now being portrayed internationally" through the media.

 She said it was fortunate that the Labour Day weekend is usually preceded by a dip in tourist traffic that begins to pick up again toward the end of the month. Otherwise, the area might not have been in a position to accommodate the requests of the airlines and investigators.

 As it was, at least one Bridgewater hotel was booked solid by Thursday afternoon and others in the area had been asked to hold rooms. "I think we'll be able to handle it," she said.


| Previous Article | Article Index | Next Article |

linelp

| Home | Front Page News | Community Directory | Subscribe | Classifieds |
| Editorial | About Our Company | Map | Lighthouse Awards | Contact Information | Advertising Rates | Summertime Events |

linelp



Lighthouse Publishing OnLine - Company profile
Lighthouse Publishing On-line
Please send your comments and hotlist entries to Comments
(c) 1996-1999 Lighthouse Publishing Ltd.
Designed by Morgan D. Lalonde