Lao Human Rights Council

WHITE PAPER ON GENOCIDE IN LAOS
by
Dr. Vang Pobzeb

Submitted to:
The Honorable Mary Robinson
U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights
U.N. Office at Geneva
8-14 Avenue de la Paix
1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

Date: July 28, 1997

Request: Investigating and stopping genocide and human rights violations in Laos.

Submitted to:
Chairperson and
Members of the U.N. Working Group
on Indigenous Populations
U.N. Office at Geneva
8-14 Avenue de la Paix
1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

Date: July 28, 1997

Request: Investigating and stopping genocide and human rights violations in Laos.

Genocide in Laos and Violations of Human Rights

Hmong and Lao people in Laos, Hmong and Lao American people in the United States, and the Lao Human Rights Council, Inc. in the United States sincerely inform the U.S. government, United Nations, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, and international human rights organizations about the true situation inside Laos. The true situation inside Laos is that genocide, human rights violations, and an ethnic cleansing war against the Hmong, both returnees and other Hmong people, are taking place. These inhumane acts have been going on for 22 years and the genocide and "killing fields" are still going on in 1997. The Communist Lao government is a violator of the human rights of the people of Laos. The people of Laos need true peace, freedom, democracy, justice, and human rights. Communism and dictatorship powers are not acceptable to the people of Laos. It is important that the United Nations and international communities become aware of the true situation in Laos, since the Lao Communist government no longer qualifies to maintain its seat in the United Nations because of the genocide and human rights violations occurring in Laos. This Communist government has not told the truth about the situation in Laos to the United Nations and the international communities.

Genocide in Laos

About 2.5 to 3 million people of Laos, Cambodia and South Vietnam have died because of the policy of genocide, human rights violations, and other related causes in the past two decades. Of this figure, about 300,000 were people of Laos killed by the Communist Lao government. Most of the victims were Hmong people. About 46,000 of these people killed by the Lao Communist government were former soldiers, their associates, and government officials under the Royal Lao government and CIA.

Many thousands of them are still in prison in 1997, without having had fair trials. Today, the killing fields are still going on in Laos. The genocide and human rights violations in Laos are "crimes against peace and crimes against humanity."

About 25,000 Hmong and Lao people were arrested, imprisoned and killed by the Communist government between 1990 and 1997. Mr. Wang Kou Vang, Nao Xue Vang, Boua Yeng Vang, Thongsouk Saysangkhi, Latsami Khamphoui and Feng Sakchittaphong, along with several thousands of other Hmong and Laotian people and citizens, were arrested and sentenced to life in prison between 1990 and 1997. Many of the Laotian and Hmong people, including political prisoners, were killed through "medical injections" and "food poisoning," yet the outside world is not being told about such killings in Laos.

Indeed, human rights violations in Laos are the worst committed against a people since the murder of six million Jewish people during World War II. The legacies of the "secret war" in Indochina and the continual acts of genocide in Laos were the major factors causing approximately 500,000 people of Laos to flee for Thailand and other places around the world between 1975 and 1995. These people are political refugees.

The legacies of the "secret war" in Laos and the Vietnam War have caused the Communist Lao government to arrest, imprison, persecute and kill many hundreds of thousands of people in Laos for revenge.

Methodologies of killing in Laos include: political and other extra-judicial killing; torture and other cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment or punishment; disappearance; arbitrary arrest; denial of fair public trial; medical injection and food poisoning; and other inhumane actions.

There is no freedom of the press, of general assembly, or of association in Laos. Arbitrary interference with privacy, family, home and correspondence, racial discrimination, and an ethnic cleansing war against the Hmong people and other minorities inside Laos have all been taking place in Laos during the past 22 years. These acts are still going on in 1997.

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1993, which was published by the U.S. Department of State, states that:

"The Lao People's Democratic Republic (LPDR) is a Communist, one-party state. The Lao People's Revolutionary Party (LPRP) is the primary source of political authority in the country. The party's leadership imposes broad controls on Laos' 4-5 million people. Consequently, it is well-known that the Communist government controls the freedom of the people of Laos."

Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1994 states that:

"Citizens do not have the ability to change their government despite Constitutional provisions for the public election of National Assembly members."

Consequently, citizens and human rights and democracy activists who want to challenge and complain against the dictatorship role of the Lao Communist government are arrested, imprisoned and killed. Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1994 continues to state that:

"There are no domestic human rights groups [in Laos]. Any organization wishing to investigate and publicly criticize the government's human rights policies would face serious obstacles, if it were permitted to operate at all. Laos generally does not cooperate with international human rights organizations."

During the democracy revolutions in Eastern Europe and in the Soviet Union between 1989 and 1992, many hundreds of democracy and human rights activists in Laos and their supporters called for democracy and the institution of multi-political parties in Laos. In October 1990, the Lao Communist government arrested and imprisoned three pro-democracy activists and vice- ministers of the Lao Communist government. Their supporters and associates were also arrested, imprisoned and killed. Many of the victims are still in prison in Laos in 1997.

The Bangkok Post of April 27, 1990, reported that:

"At least 35 people were killed when Laotian government troops suppressed pro-democracy rallies in four Laotian provinces last month."

Consequently, the Lao Communist government has suppressed pro-democracy groups and human rights activists in Laos since the end of the Vietnam War, and continues to do so in 1997, in order to maintain the Communist state and dictatorship powers in Laos.

After the end of the Vietnam War and the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, many bureaucrats, officials and lifetime foreign service individuals in the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Embassies in Thailand and Laos, the Thai government, the UNHCR, and Embassies of other countries around the world who are in Laos, have been working together to denounce and deny information, evidence and reports of genocide and human rights violations in Laos. They have been working together to hide information and deny reports of forced repatriation of refugees from Thailand to Laos and of persecution of returnees in Laos because they need to do business in Laos.

However, many credible reports confirm that forced repatriation of refugees from Thailand to Laos and persecution, torture, and murder of returnees in Laos is occurring. On September 11, 1993, Mr. Vue Mai, a leader of Hmong returnees in Laos, was arrested by the Communist Lao government. He then disappeared. The U.S. Department of State, UNHCR and U.S. Embassies in Laos and Thailand remain silent on the disappearance of Vue Mai and on several similar disappearances. The arrest and disappearance of Vue Mai and the other similar cases are credible evidence of persecution against returnees in Laos. From 1991 to 1995, about 5,000 Hmong returnees in Laos were arrested, imprisoned and killed by the Communist Lao government. Since 1991, over 14,000 Hmong refugees in Thailand have been forced to return to Laos.

The policies of the Comprehensive Plan of Action (CPA) of 1989 on Indochinese refugees and the Tripartite Agreement of 1991 on Laotian and Hmong refugees are seriously "corrupt" and "flawed." This is because the policy of voluntary repatriation has been changed to one of forced repatriation, and the UNHCR and U.S. Embassy in Laos do not monitor and guarantee the safety and freedom of returnees in Laos.

About 35,000 Hmong refugees have escaped from refugee camps in Thailand to many displaced locations and unknown areas since 1991 in order to avoid forced repatriation from Thailand to Laos. The futures of these refugees are in danger and are uncertain, because they lack food, shelter, and basic human needs, and they are not receiving international attention and protection.

The forced repatriation of refugees from Thailand to Laos; the arrest and imprisonment of refugees who oppose forced repatriation, corruption and the flaws in the CPA and Tripartite Agreement; and the denials of evidence and reports of forced repatriation and human rights violations in Laos are all betrayals of the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights laws and the "American values" of human rights, freedom, democracy, justice and civil rights.

Reliable sources from Thailand and Communist Laos confirm that the Thai authorities forced thirteen (13) Hmong refugees in Thailand to return to Laos in January 1996. The Communist Lao government imprisoned these innocent returnees in Samkhe Prison in Vientiane, Laos. Indeed, there are many thousands of cases similar to these thirteen cases, in which the Communist Lao government has acted against Hmong returnees and other people in Laos. These acts are violations of international human rights and refugee laws and of the Charter of the United Nations.

Cases of Persecutions and Genocide Against the Hmong and
Laotian People and those who are Returnees in Laos

Several reliable and credible reports from family members of the victims in Laos and parties concerned, as well as human rights organizations, confirm that the Communist Lao government has arrested, imprisoned, tortured and murdered the following Laotian people in Laos:

1. In March 1977, the Communist authorities of the Lao Communist government arrested and imprisoned King Savang Vatthana, the Queen, the Crown Prince, Vong Savang, and Mr. Touby Lyfoung, and many hundreds of high-ranking officials and former soldiers in Laos. Several sources confirmed that the above arrestees were executed by the Lao Communist government. In the past two decades more than 300,000 people of Laos have been killed by the Lao Communist government. Of this figure, about 46,000 victims were former soldiers, high-ranking officials, CIA employees and their family members and associates.

2. The U.S. government, UNHCR and the Thai government must recognize that forced repatriation and murders of Hmong refugees have been occurring since 1987. The Washington Post of March 22, 1987, said that, "Some refugee officials in Washington have said the Hmong would be tortured or even killed if they returned" to Laos. The Minneapolis Star and Tribune of April 22, 1987, reported that the Pathet Lao government killed the Hmong returnees in March 1987. The Bangkok Post of November 23, 1987, reported that "more than 100 Hmong have been killed by Pathet troops this year (1987) after being forced across the Mekong from Ban Hat Bia," Thailand.

Kia Lor, a survivor and witness of the Hmong massacres by the Communist Lao government, stated that "All of the people began crying because we knew that they would kill us." She recalled:

"They took us to the top of a hill, putting a rope around the adults' necks, they made us sit in a line like we were going to dance. They told the women, `Take your babies off your backs and hold them in front of you.' My mother told us, `Now they will kill us. We don't talk.' Then the soldiers shot us with B-40 rockets and their guns."

Kia passed out in shock and loss of blood. She woke just before sunset and found everyone around her dead.

"My mother was lying on her back, shot in her head. Brother Teng's head was all broken, and brother Pheng and sister Yer were shot in the chest. All of them dead. I just sat with the bodies."

Kia, badly wounded in her shoulder and arms, lay beside her mother's body for three days.

"I saw the flies lay eggs on my mother and the other bodies. I tried picking them out of my mother's wounds but I was unable to get them out of my own wounds."

(SOURCES: Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, New York, United States, 1989, pp. 16-18; and Bangkok Post, Thailand, November 23, 1987.)

On July 15, 1997, the U.S. Congressional Human Rights Caucus conducted a congressional hearing on human rights violations in Laos. Kia Lor testified before the U.S. Congress. She witnessed that on November 16, 1987, "The Lao Communists killed my mom, my older brother, my middle brother, younger brother, and baby sister. Altogether, the Lao Communists killed 33 Hmong that day. I was shot and seriously wounded. The Communists thought I was dead, and they left me for dead. The Lao Communists killed all my family. I am all alone" (St. Paul Pioneer Press, July 16, 1997, pages 1A and 5A). Kia Lor continued, "If the U.S. government chooses to ignore these murders and human rights violations, the Lao Communists will continue to take advantage of the Hmong and continue to persecute and kill them." She told the members of the U.S. Congress that, "You cannot just stand by and let the Lao Communists destroy the Hmong men, women and children like my family" (Star Tribune, July 16, 1997, page A9).
Indeed, many thousands of Hmong and Lao people and returnees have been massacred and killed by the Lao Communist government in Laos in the past two decades. The "Killing Fields" of Laos are still going on today.

3. On October 8, 1990, the Lao Communist government arrested and imprisoned Mr. Thongsouk Saysangkhi, Latsami Khamphoui and Feng Sakchittaphong without a fair trial. They all three were vice ministers under the Lao Communist government.

4. Reliable and credible sources from Laos confirmed and reported that the Communist Lao government arrested, tortured and imprisoned Mr. Wa Kou Vang and Nao Xue Vang in Phongsavang, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos, and Mr. Boua Yeng Vang at Paksane Airport, along with 30 other Hmong people in Muang Mok, Borikhamaxay Province on March 4, 1992. Those victims are not returnees. They are innocent citizens in Laos. They were sentenced for a lifetime without a fair trial.

5. According to credible sources from Laos and Thailand, the following Laotian returnees were arrested, imprisoned and killed by the Communist Lao government.

(a) Mr. San Khamoung Vilai, forced from Thailand to Laos in 1989, he died in jail on May 13, 1993 in Muang Pak Lai, Sagnabouri Province, Laos.

(b) Mr. Vam Deth was forced to Laos from Thailand in 1989 and he was imprisoned after he arrived in Muang Pak Lai, Sagnabouri Province. He died in 1992.

(c) Mr. Boun Phoumi was forced to Laos on May 15, 1991. He was arrested and imprisoned immediately after he arrived in Muang Pak Lai. He died in jail in December, 1993.

(d) Mr. Sam Bouam Sou was repatriated under the UNHCR from Thailand to Laos in 1992. He was arrested and imprisoned immediately after he arrived in Pak Lai, Sagnabouri Province. In February 1993 he died in jail.

(e) Mr. Xieng Van was a volunteer returnee under the policy of the UNHCR on July 1, 1993. He was arrested and imprisoned immediately after he arrived in Pak Lai. He died in jail in Pak Lai, Sagnabouri Province, Laos, on July 5, 1993.

6. Mr. Vue Mai, a leader of Hmong returnees, disappeared on September 11, 1993. Mrs. Vue Mai and her son told the world that the Communist government in Laos is 100 percent responsible for the disappearance of Mr. Vue Mai.

7. Mr. Chong Moua Thao, the Vice Chairman of the Chieng Kham Refugee Camp, Thailand, and a leader of returnees, died of food poisoning after eating with Lao government officials on September 15, 1993.

8. Mr. Chao Moua (BSC 047) was forced by government officials and the UNHCR to return from the Napho Camp to Laos in April 1994. He was murdered by the Lao Communist government on May 18, 1994, in Van Vieng, Northern Vientiane, Laos.

9. Mr. Chong Neng Vang was arrested, tortured and murdered by the Lao Communist government on June 22, 1994. He was not a returnee, but a former CIA soldier (1963-1975) who was forced down from the highlands to a relocation site two years ago.

10. In July 1994, the Voice of America (VOA) broadcast in the Lao language that those Hmong people and returnees in Laos who were interested in coming to the United States for resettlement and family reunification must register in order to be considered for resettlement. The Lao Communist government authorized that registration must be passed through its administration and authorities, before the U.S. Embassy in Vientiane. Between July and August 1994, about 3,000 Hmong people and returnees registered in the offices of the Lao Communist government. On July 27, Mr. Blia Tou Vue, a victim of forced repatriation, and his two relatives, Pao Vue and Yang Chue Vue, were arrested and sentenced to 20 years in jail without a fair trial. According to eyewitnesses from Laos, about 2,000 of the 3,000 people were arrested and imprisoned between July and August 1994. About 1,000 people escaped to the countryside. Their lives are unknown (Sources from Laos, September 11, 1994).

11. Mr. Yang Chao Xiong, a returnee from the Chieng Kham Camp, Thailand, was arrested and imprisoned on May 22, 1994, in Phongsavang, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos.

12. On October 28, 1994, Lao soldiers massacred two Hmong people in Vientiane Province. Sources from Laos confirmed that the two victims were Mr. Nhia Chue Her and Kou Her. Mr. Kia Xue Hang accompanied the two victims and witnessed the massacres (letter of January 19, 1995, from nine U.S. Senators to Warren Christopher).

13. Between November 1994 and April 1995, the Communist Lao government sent many thousands of soldiers to massacre, torture, arrest, and kill about 5,000 Hmong men, women and children, including innocent civilians of the general public, in Phan Phai and Phou Lan, near Muang Cha (Lima Site 113) and many other places in northern Laos (information from informed sources in Laos dated April 24, 1995, and the Lacrosse Tribune, April 9, 1995).

14. On March 11, 1995, several hundreds of Communist Pathet Lao soldiers under the government of the Lao People's Democratic Republic (LPDR) tortured, raped and opened fire on the Hmong civilians, killing Mr. Chong Koua Vang, Mr. Nao Sher Lee and Mrs. Vang. "The soldiers surrounded the three wounded civilians and tied them up. The soldiers proceeded to cut the victims' clothing into pieces, then beat them until their bones and skulls were crushed. Mrs. Vang was raped and tortured, then beaten to death. The three died with no clothes on," in Moung Mok, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos. Mr. Nao Sher Lee was a returnee. These three victims are relatives of Mr. Tou Ger Vang in Fresno, California.

15. On May 11, the Communist Pathet Lao soldiers massacred and killed two Hmong civilians: Mr. Za Xiong Yang and Mrs. Xia Vue in Kham Vieng Village, Mouang Mok, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos. Three other civilians were seriously wounded. These victims have family members in Fresno, California.

16. On May 26, 1995, the Communist Pathet Lao soldiers opened fire and killed Mr. Neng Vang, a Hmong returnee in Nambat Village, Oudomxai Province, Laos. Neng Vang and about 374 Hmong refugees were forced to return to Laos on March 30, 1995, from the Napho Camp, Thailand. Neng Vang's family members are in Sacramento and Fresno, California.

17. Reliable sources from Laos, are eyewitnesses that about 13 returnees died after they ate food in the repatriation site in Muang Pham, Bouakhao Province, Laos, in June 1995. About 100 returnees were seriously sick after they ate the food which was provided by the UNHCR and the Communist Pathet Lao government. Those Hmong returnees and victims were forced to return to Laos from the Napho Camp, Thailand on May 10, 1995.

18. The Communist Lao government imprisoned thirteen (13) Hmong returnees in Samkhe Jail in Vientiane, Laos, in 1996. These victims are:

a. Mr. Wang Chue Yang, 41 years old
b. Mr. Chue Ma Vang, 55 years old
c. Mr. Tong Toua Vang, 58 years old
d. Mr. Xai Xang Chang, 48 years old
e. Mr. Pang Tou Lee, 37 years old
f. Mr. Lee Vang, 30 years old
g. Mr. Xai Toua Vang, 48 years old
h. Mr. Xang Herr, 33 years old
i. Mr. Cher Tong Lee, 46 years old
j. Mr. Chang Teng Thao, 58 years old
k. Mr. Yong Xao Herr, 50 years old
l. Mr. Shoua Thao, 33 years old
m. Mr. Xia Dang Thao, 30 years old (Sources: Eyewitnesses from Laos and St. Paul Pioneer Press, April 2, 1997)

19. Witnesses in Laos confirmed that on October 20, 1996, two soldiers of the Communist Lao government: Kham Muang and Kham Kuet arrested, tortured and killed Mr. Va Lee, a Hmong civilian in the village in Muong Ong, Muong Cha area, northern Laos.

20. Reliable sources from Laos confirmed that between October 1996 and February 1997, the Communist Lao government sent its soldiers to kill more than 2,000 Hmong people in Muong Ou, Muang Cha, Northern Laos, Paksan, Bonrikham Xay, Khammouane, Southern provinces, and elsewhere in Xieng Khouang Province, Northern Laos. Many thousands of civilians were arrested and imprisoned by the Communist Lao government.

On January 16, 1997, the Communist Lao soldiers massacred and killed eight Hmong civilians in Muong Ou, Muang Cha area, Northern Laos. Those victims of genocide were:

Adults:

1. Mrs. Yia Xiong, 65 years old.
2. Mrs. Mee Xiong, 35 years old.
3. Mrs. Cha Mee Xiong, 25 years old.

Children:

4. Yong Yang, 12 years old.
5. Khue Yang, 11 years old.
6. Tou Kao Yang, 3 years old.
7. Tong Yang, 3 years old.
8. Shoua Yang, 7 months old.

(Sources: eyewitness reports from Laos and St. Paul Pioneer Press, March 24, 1997.)

21. On November 29, 1996, Lao Communist soldiers arrested, imprisoned, and tortured five Hmong civilians in KM 52, Northern Vientiane, Laos. Those victims were:

1. Mr. Chue Xang Khang.
2. Mr. Kayee Khang.
3. Mr. Choua Dang Khang.
4. Mr. Choua Dang Xiong.
5. Mr. Chue Toua Ly.

22. Mr. Kou Yang, a leader of Hmong returnees in Laos, witnessed and confirmed that human rights violations and genocide in Laos have been going on for two decades. He witnessed that on April 28, 1994, several hundreds of Hmong refugees in the Napho Camp, Thailand were forced to return to Communist Laos. At the Nong Khai bridge between Laos and Thailand, two officials of the U.S. State Department and U.S. Embassy in Thailand met with Kou Yang. Kou Yang declared to them there they must remember that they, the Thai authorities, and officials of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) were conspirators in the forced repatriation of Kou Yang and several hundreds of Hmong and Lao refugees from the Napho Camp, Thailand to return to Laos. The two officials remained silent after he said this. Kou Yang witnessed that the UNHCR, Lao Communist government, and international organizations did not provide food or basic human needs to Hmong and Lao returnees in Laos. Many hundreds of people starved to death. Many thousands of people lacked medical care.

Kou Yang witnessed that the situation of human rights violations and the killing fields in Laos are most serious. He has personal knowledge of four cases:

1. On June 18, 1995, Pathet Lao military and police forces took into custody about 20 Hmong soldiers recruited to fight for them during the war and had them killed because they thought they would turn anti-government.

2. In December 1995, three children died after a Lao helicopter dropped what looked like "yellow rain" on the Pha Thao Village (North Vientiane, Laos).

3. On June 20, 1996, uniformed Pathet Lao soldiers accused three Hmong of helping the resistance movement and took them to concentration camps.

4. On October 22, 1995, Yang was visiting his family in Kong Khai, a four-day walk from his village, when Lao soldiers who thought villagers had been involved in a skirmish 20 miles away attacked Kong Khai, killing Yang's brother- in-law with a grenade. A child was also killed in the fighting he said.

(Fresno Bee, Fresno, California, February 17, 1997 and March 17, 1997; interview of Kou Yang on February 9, 1997; and Affidavit of Kou Yang, March 25, 1997.)

Mr. Kou Yang declared that he is seeking "political asylum" in the United States because he fears persecution and punishment upon his return to Communist Laos. Mr. Kou Yang expressed with concern, "I am afraid because I have already been contacted by leaders of the State Department who funded non-governmental organizations involved with returning Hmong to Laos. Because they received a lot of U.S. government money to repatriate the Hmong people to the Communist regime in Laos, they apparently do not want the truth to come out about the bad things happening to the Hmong in Laos" (Fresno Bee, March 17, 1997).

On July 15, 1997, Kou Yang, a witness and a leader of Hmong returnees in Van Vieng, Laos, declared to the U.S. Congress that the Lao Communist government in Laos has been committing human rights violations and genocide against Hmong people and returnees in Laos (St. Paul Pioneer Press and Star Tribune, July 16, 1997).

H.R. 1561 of May 1995 prohibits use of funds when it states: "None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a) are authorized to be available for any program or activity that provides for, promotes, or assists in the repatriation of any person to Vietnam, Laos, or Cambodia, unless the president has certified that (1) all persons described in subsection (a)(4) who were residents of refugee camps as of July 1, 1995, have been offered resettlement outside their countries of nationality."

As a result, the U.S. Congress must monitor, investigate and audit some governmental officials, actors and non-profit organizations based in the Washington, D.C. area and their officers and supporters, because they have been using the money of American taxpayers to operate the repatriation program of Hmong and Lao refugees from Thailand to death in Communist Laos.

23. Eyewitnesses reported from Laos confirmed that on January 28, 1997, the Communist Lao government arrested, tortured and imprisoned nine Hmong people in Phongsavan, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos. Those victims and prisoners are:

1. Mr. Xaiker Vue from Ban Lun Hua.
2. Mr. Nou Vue from Ban Lun Hua.
3. Mrs. Bouahue Vang from Ban Kham Phueng.
4. Mr. Ger Vang from Ban Kham Phueng.
5. Mr. Tongva Lee from Ban Kham Phueng.
6. Mr. Vangneng Lee from Ban Kham Phueng.
7. Mr. Yia Lor from Ban Khamsy.
8. Mr. Cha Xiong from Ban Khamsy.
9. Mr. Xaidoua Vue from Ban Khamsy.

24. Eyewitnesses reported from Laos confirmed that in March 1997, 40 Communist Lao soldiers massacred and killed Mr. Song Seng Ly and his son in a village in Phongsavang, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos. The Communist Lao soldiers cut the body of Song Seng Ly and his son into many pieces and burned them.

25. Eyewitnesses reported from Laos confirmed that on June 11, 1997, the Communist Lao government killed Mr. Xay Chue Lor, Mrs. Mai Vue Lor, Ka Mao Lor and Mrs. Pa Lor in Van Xay Village, Xieng Khouang Province, Laos. Those victims are civilians.

26. Eyewitnesses and sources from Laos confirmed that the Communist Lao government arrested and imprisoned fifteen (15) Hmong families who were forced to return from Southern China to Burma and then Sam Neua, Northern Laos, on June 13, 1997. There were more than 40 Hmong returnees who were arrested and imprisoned by the Communist Lao government.

27. Witnesses reporting from Laos confirmed that on July 17, 1997 the Communist Lao soldiers invaded Nam Fam Village, near Muang Cha area, Northern Laos. The Communist Lao soldiers arrested and imprisoned:

Mr. Xao Kao Chang
Mr. Vang Xue Chang
Mr. Xai Pao Chang
Mr. Chue Yang
Mr. Chong Neng Yang
Mr. Nhia Dang Xiong

In addition, the Communist Lao soldiers also killed many hundreds of Hmong civilians in Nam Fam, Muang Cha area, Muong Oun and other locations. Sources from Laos reported that the Communist Lao government still are using poison gas and chemical weapons to kill Hmong people and Lao people in Laos.

28. Statements and reports of Kou Yang, a leader of Hmong returnees in Ban Phan Thao, Van Vieng, Vientiane Province, Laos, of March 25, 1997, and letter of May 9, 1997, which was signed by 50 Hmong returnees and group leaders of Ban Phan Thao, Van Vieng, Laos, stated that the Lao Communist government has seized over 50 hectares of land from Hmong returnees. Therefore, there are 55 families who did not get land for agricultural development and production (Statements and letters of Yang Koua, March 25, 1997, and 50 group leaders of Hmong returnees, Ban Phan Thao, Van Vieng, Laos, May 9, 1997).

In order for the Nazi authorities to murder more than 6 million Jewish people in Europe during World War II, the Nazi authorities used many agents, individuals and organizations to divide and cause disunity among the Jewish people, organizations and communities throughout Germany, Poland, and other countries in Europe. The Nazi authorities and their supporters and agents worked hard to hide information and evidence of the genocide carried out against the Jewish people. The Nazi authorities and their supporters and agents worked hard to sabotage and make false accusations against Jewish organizations and actors who saved the lives of Jewish people and opposed the genocide against the Jewish people. The World Jewish Congress was attacked and sabotaged by the Nazi authorities, agents and supporters. The Nazi authorities used their agents and supporters to support the deportation of Jewish people from Poland to Germany and from Jewish territories to many concentration camps in Germany and other countries in Europe, in the attempt to achieve their "final solution" to the problems of Jewish people in Europe the "Holocaust." Similarly, the Communist Lao government in Laos and its Embassy in Washington, D.C., and their supporters and actors of the repatriation of Hmong and Lao refugees in Thailand have been using some nonprofit organizations and individuals in the United States to support and endorse the repatriation and deportation of Hmong and Lao refugees from camps in Thailand to Communist Laos. Officials of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Communist Lao government, U.S. Embassies in Laos and Thailand, the Thai government, the State Department in Washington, D.C., and their supporters, conspirators and associates must recognize and honor the existence of information and evidence of forced repatriation of refugees from Thailand to Communist Laos and human rights violations against the people of Laos and returnees in Laos, including Vue Mai. Conspirators of the repatriation program, genocide in Laos, and Communist agents have sabotaged and made false statements against Hmong and Lao human rights organizations in the United States, including a threat to the Lao Human Rights Council, Inc. and other protectors of civil rights and human rights. This is similar to the conspiracies against the Jewish people and Jewish organizations during World War II. Conspirators and actors who were involved in the "genocide" against Jewish people in Europe committed "crimes against peace and crimes against humanity." Similarly, conspirators and actors who have been in the forced repatriation programs of Hmong and Lao refugees from Thailand to communist Laos and genocide against people and returnees in Laos are also committing "crimes against peace and crimes against humanity." These are "Nazi war criminals" in Laos. As a result, the United States and member states of the United Nations and international human rights organizations must not remain silent on human rights violations in Laos.

Hmong and Lao people in Laos and refugees in Thailand are human beings. They need international human rights protection. Hmong and Lao refugees in the camps in Thailand oppose forced repatriation to return to Laos because there are no human rights methodologies and groups monitoring and stopping genocide and persecution against returnees and other people in Laos.

There are many thousands of cases similar to the above, in which Hmong and Lao people in Laos have been arrested, tortured, imprisoned and killed by the Communist Lao government in Laos in the past 22 years. As stated previously, the genocide and killing fields are still going on inside Laos. Therefore, Hmong and Lao people in Laos and Hmong and Lao American people and the Lao Human Rights Council, Inc. in the United States call upon and appeal to the U.S. government, the United Nations, international communities, and international human rights organizations to investigate and stop the genocide, killing fields, and other human rights violations against Hmong and Lao people in Laos. There is no true peace and there are no human rights in Laos. This is because the Communist Lao government has been waging a major war against the Hmong ethnic group and against other minority groups in Laos, for revenge, for two decades. The killing fields against these groups still goes on today.

The Charter of the United Nations and other international human rights conventions and principles require that all member states of the United Nations shall promote and respect human rights and humanitarian character. Therefore, the U.S. government, Thai government and United Nations must recognize and honor the evidence and information of human rights violations in Laos. The denial of this information and evidence of the human rights violations against the people of Laos is a denial and betrayal of human rights and the Charter of the United Nations. Forced repatriation of Hmong and Lao refugees in Thailand to return to death in Communist Laos in order to solve the problems of the refugee crisis and the genocide against the people and returnees in Laos are violations of the Charter of the United Nations and international law.

Fourteen Points on Restoration of Peace
and Ending Genocide in Laos

The Lao Human Rights Council, Inc. in the United States proposes the following fourteen points to restore peace and end genocide in Laos as follows:

1. Appeal to the U.S. government and the United Nations to impose international sanctions against the Lao People's Democratic Republic (LPDR) Communist Laos.

2. Appeal to the U.S. government to withdraw or cut off diplomatic relations with the Lao Communist government in Laos.

3. Appeal to the U.S. Government to cut off all U.S. foreign aid and economic assistance to the Lao Communist government Marxist- Leninist regime and oppressive government in Laos.

4. Appeal to the U.S. government not to discuss and grant Most Favored Nation (MFN) trading status to the Marxist-Leninist regime in Laos because this regime is a violator of human rights.

5. Appeal to the U.S. government and the United Nations and international human rights organizations to establish an international human rights commission (independent commission) including the Lao Human Rights Council, Inc., Asia watch, Amnesty International, Lawyers Committee for Human Rights and other international human rights organizations.

6. Appeal to the U.S. government, United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN nations) to bring true peace, democracy, human rights, freedom, stability and national reconciliation to Laos.

7. Appeal to the U.S. government, United Nations and ASEAN nations to pressure the Lao Communist government immediately and unconditionally end its brutalization, terrorism, oppression, genocide, massacres and war against Hmong and Lao people of Laos. Political prisoners must be released unconditionally and general amnesty must be granted to the prisoners and people in Laos.

8. Appeal to the International Red Cross and international relief agencies and human rights organizations and human rights agencies, international communities and the U.S. government and the United Nations to send food and medical supplies, and to provide other basic human needs to those people who escaped and have lived in the countryside for 22 years because of Communist oppression, terrorism, genocide, the killing fields and human rights violations committed by the Lao Communist government in Laos.

9. Appeal to the World Bank and other international financial institutions and international organizations to cut off and withdraw all types of foreign aid and loans to the Lao Communist government because of human rights violations, genocide, and the ethnic cleansing war in Laos.

10. Appeal to ASEAN nations, Australia, Japan, the United Kingdom, France, Canada, the United States and all respected human rights governments in the whole world to break off diplomatic relations with and cut off foreign aid and economic assistance to the Communist regime.

11. Appeal to the U.S. Congress and government to investigate governmental officials, public and private agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), non-profit organizations and individuals in the United States who have promoted and operated the repatriation program of Hmong and Lao refugees from Thailand to death in Communist concentration camps in Communist Laos. Appeal to the U.S. Congress to investigate and stop the Communist Lao Embassy in Washington, D.C. and Communist Lao government in Laos because it has been using individuals and organizations in the United States to create division, troubles, and gang problems for Hmong and Lao American people in the United States.

12. Appeal to the U.S. Congress and government to investigate and stop forced repatriation of Hmong and Lao refugees from Thailand to death in Communist Laos and human rights violations against returnees in Laos.

13. Appeal to the U.S. Congress and government to open the door for Hmong and Lao refugees in Thailand, screened-out and screened-in refugees, to resettle in the United States for political reasons and family reunification.

14. Appeal to the U.S. government and U.S. Congress, ASEAN nations, Australia, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Canada, United Nations, and international human rights organizations to recognize and honor the fact that there are serious human rights violations, genocide and an ethnic cleansing war against Hmong and Lao people in Laos.



For Additional Information Contact the Main Office:

Dr. Vang Pobzeb
Lao Human Rights Council, Inc.
P.O. Box 1606
Eau Claire, WI 54702
Phone (715)831-8355
Fax (715)831-8563

Lao Human Rights Council, Inc. - - - - - - Click Home Page

For General Information. call: 715-831-8355 or e-mail laohumrights@earthlink.net

Lao Human Rights Council, Inc.