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A Teacher's Guide to Folklife Resources for K-12 Classrooms

Prepared by Peter Bartis and Paddy Bowman
American Folklife Center
Library of Congress, Washington 1994

Publications of the American Folklife Center, no. 19


The printed version of this publication is currently unavailable.

Illustration (above): border motif taken from a traditional Polish wycinanki paper cutting by Magdalena Gilinsky. Select here for more information and an image of the original artwork.


CONTENTS

Preface

Introduction: Incorporating Folklife and Community Culture into the K-12 Curriculum

The American Folklife Center

Part I: Folklife in Education: A Guide to Resources

Part II: Agencies with Folklife Programs

Selected Readings in Folklore and Folklife Studies


PREFACE

A Teacher's Guide to Folklife Resources is a list of materials recently prepared for the classroom by folklorists and other cultural studies specialists in closely related fields.

Most of the materials listed are available upon request, but they may be difficult to locate by those outside the profession of folklife studies. One purpose of this guide is to put teachers in touch with folklife specialists at the state and local level and to encourage a dialogue between them. States and U.S. Territories and Trusts have been particularly active proponents of folklife and regional culture studies, and, today, all states support folklife programs.

The second part of this guide includes a selected list of agencies with established commitments to folklife programming. Teachers and principals interested in learning more are urged to consult this list for local assistance. Finally, a brief list of suggested readings has been included for those who wish to know more about folklife studies and methodology.

If you have suggestions, comments, or materials that you would like to submit for inclusion in the Center's developing teacher resource files, please write to: Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, Education Initiative, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540-4610.

INTRODUCTION: INCORPORATING FOLKLIFE AND COMMUNITY CULTURE INTO THE K-12 CURRICULUM

Increasingly, teachers are using folklife, folk arts, and oral history--a community's cultural heritage--to enhance K-12 education. For decades, teachers have recognized that oral history projects and inter-generational, inter-racial, and inter- cultural programs that require activities both in and outside the classroom provide stimulating ways to develop writing and communication skills. They enliven with real-world examples the study of history, music, art, social studies, and other topics from integration to immigration. Equally important, lessons enriched by community examples infuse civic responsibility and address many of today's social problems. They help to instill a sense of place and purpose, as they nurture a student's relationship to his or her community.

Ideas such as cultural diversity and multiculturalism have achieved considerable attention in recent years. Folklorists and other cultural specialists, for example, study the distinguishing components of specific cultures, regions, age groups, or communities. But they seek to promote unity through understanding and appreciation of diversity. In the end, the similarities of humans are greater than their differences.

Many items listed in this resource guide are not multicultural programs. They do, in fact, encourage both students and teachers to look to their own communities for provocative examples and illustrations of their classroom lessons. Many popular programs encourage interviews with senior citizens, neighbors, and families; some use local music and crafts to illustrate history and social sciences; still others, through folk-artist-in-the-schools programs, bring to the classroom living representatives of the cultural traditions and heritage of their respective communities.

WHAT IS FOLKLIFE?

Folklife is the traditional cultural expression of ethnic, regional, occupational, and other groups that share a common body of traditional knowledge, skills, and behaviors. What characterizes a folklife study is its special breadth and approach. A folklife study of a multicultural community, for example, might begin with immigration history, but also look at traditional music, foods, religious festivals, dance, and home life as well as the ways ethnic groups adapt, adjust, and change their cultures in relation to the broader community. A folklife study of another community might focus on local storytellers, artisans, oral histories of events in the community's past, reunions, hunting and trapping techniques, and the work and lives of fishermen, boat builders, or farmers.

P.L. 94-201, The American Folklife Preservation Act of 1976 (20 USC 2101), which created the American Folklife Center, states the following:

that the diversity inherent in American folklife has contributed greatly to the cultural richness of the Nation and has fostered a sense of individuality and identity among the American people; . . . [and] that it is in the interest of the general welfare of the Nation to preserve, support, revitalize, and disseminate American folklife traditions and arts. . . . The term "American folklife" means the traditional expressive culture shared within the various groups in the United States: familial, ethnic, occupational, religious, regional; expressive culture includes a wide range of creative and symbolic forms such as custom, belief, technical skill, language, literature, art, architecture, music, play, dance, drama, ritual, pageantry, handicraft; these expressions are mainly learned orally, by imitation, or in performance, and are generally maintained without benefit of formal instruction or institutional direction.

THE AMERICAN FOLKLIFE CENTER

The American Folklife Center was established in 1976 by a Title 20 Education Act, the American Folklife Preservation Act (P.L. 94-201). It is a small and versatile organization designed to operate in cooperation with other federal state and local agencies and organizations and to initiate independent programs using its own resources. It is mandated by Congress to engage in a broad range of educational and research activities that preserve, revitalize, and present America's rich and diverse cultural heritage--a heritage associated with ethnic, regional, and occupational cultures.

The Center advocates for the recognition and incorporation of cultural diversity in all aspects of programming: classroom curricula, museum education, city planning, environmental protection, youth programs, and community projects. Its programs, publications, and interagency advisories have contributed significantly to national trends in cultural awareness and to the formulation of contemporary objectives promulgating cultural sensitivity, awareness, and understanding.

The Center encourages and periodically undertakes community study and documentation projects during which members of its staff accompanied by other professionals document community life, arts, and work throughout the United States. Such projects undertaken by the Center have been associated with planning assistance for the development of state and community-based programs to support and recognize grassroots community arts and cultural expression and to develop community education programs and planning statements.

In addition to its advisory services, field documentation projects, publications, and educational programs, the Center operates the Archive of Folk Culture. The Archive of Folk Culture is the national repository for collections of traditional cultural materials representing all regional, ethnic, and occupational groups in the United States and all cultural areas of the world. Containing over one million items--manuscripts, sound recordings, photographs, and other ethnographic materials-- the Archive serves as a national resource to educators and independent scholars.

Return to Table of Contents

PART I
Folklife In Education: A Guide to Resources

Ball, John, ed. Folklore and Folklife: A Teacher's Manual. Washington, DC: Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Smithsonian Institution, 43 pp., 1980. Folklife Program staff define and offer teaching materials for folk music, occupational folklife, family folklore, children's folklife, ethnic folklore, material folklife, festivals. For ninth grade and up. Can prepare students for annual Festival of American Folklife. Available from the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Smithsonian Institution, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, SW, Suite 2600, Washington, DC, 20560, 202/287-3424, $3.

Bartis, Peter. Folklife and Fieldwork: A Layman's Introduction to Field Techniques. Washington, DC: American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, 39 pp., 1979, revised 1990. A basic, accessible guide to developing collection projects. Earlier edition available in Spanish. Order from the Library of Congress, American Folklife Center, 101 Independence Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20540-4610, shipping cost only.

Beck, Jane. Legacy of the Lake: A Study Guide to Folklore of the Lake Champlain Region. Middlebury: Vermont Folklife Center, 46 pp., 1985. Gives general description of area folklore, projects, glossary, resources. Order from the center, P.O. Box 442, Middlebury, VT 05753, 802/388-4964 (see Vermont Folklife Center for other materials.)

Belanus, Betty, et al. Folklore in the Classroom. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Bureau, 161 pp., 1985. A practical workbook easily adapted for other regions. Rich with definitions, ideas, step-by-step applications, essays, bibliography, resources. Order from Indiana Historical Bureau, 140 N. Senate, Indianapolis, IN 46204, 317/232-2537, $5.

Bell, Michael E. Legends and Tall Tales in Colonial Rhode Island: A Secondary School Study Guide. Providence: Rhode Island Folklife Project, 46 pp., 1988. Thorough definitions, examples, classroom activities, bibliography. Available from the project, Old State House, 150 Benefit St., Providence, RI 02903, 401/277- 2669, $3.

Bell, Michael E. Rattling Chains and Dreadful Noises: Customs and Arts of Halloween. Providence: Rhode Island Folklife Project, 12 pp., 1988. Summarizes Halloween traditions, activities, resources for elementary teachers. Available from the project, Old State House, 150 Benefit St., Providence, RI 02903, 401/277-2669, $3.

Benincasa, Janis, ed. Greetings from Staten Island. Staten Island, NY: Staten Island Council on the Arts, 44 pp., 1987. The product of a year's folk arts project in Staten Island elementary schools. Available from SICA, One Edgewater Plaza, Room 212, Staten Island, NY 10305, 718/447-4485.

Bowman, Paddy B. Conversations on the State of Folk Arts in Education. Washington, DC: Folk Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 48 pp., 1993. Summarizes conversations with people involved in folk arts in education. Outlines values, opportunities, strategies, needs, and possibilities. Available from Folk Arts Program, NEA, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20506, 202/682-5449, free.

Brooklyn Historical Society. Many Faces, Many Ways: Multi- Cultural Diversity of Brooklyn Guide for Teachers. 40 pp., 1990. A guide for Brooklyn with ideas and activity sheets adaptable elsewhere. Available from the society at 128 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn, NY 11201, 718/624-0890.

Bucuvalas, Tina. South Florida Folk Arts: A Teacher Guide. Miami: Dade County Public Schools and Historical Museum of Southern Florida, 145 pp., 1988. Text for semester-long elective course may be used for shorter units. Defines folk arts, offers activities, reprints, bibliography for grades K-12. Available from the museum, 101 W. Flagler St., Miami, FL 33130, $20.

Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs. The Annual Florida Folk Festival: A Cultural Crossroads for 40 Years. White Springs: Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs, 11 pp., 1992. A teacher's guide to prepare students for the 1992 festival with definitions, artists' profiles, evaluation. Order from FFP, P.O. Box 265, White Springs, FL 32096, 904/397-2192, cost of copying (25 cents/page) plus shipping.

Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs. Florida Folk Art: Material Culture Instructional Unit. White Springs: Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs, 85 pp., nd. A thorough guide to varied genres with lots of ideas and materials for students of all grades. Order from FFP, P.O. Box 265, White Springs, FL 32096, 904/397-2192 cost of copying (25 cents/page) plus shipping.

Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs. Folklife in the Classroom: A Guide for Florida Teachers. White Springs: Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs, 12 pp., 1983. Basic booklet for Florida teachers. Order from FFP, P.O. Box 265, White Springs, FL 32096, 904/397-2192, shipping cost only.

California Academy of Sciences. The Contemporary Native American Pow Wow: A Teaching Kit for Grades 1 Through 5. San Francisco: California Academy of Sciences, 83 pp., 1991. This useful booklet, which a folklorist helped develop, is part of a teaching kit and includes definitions, curriculum, lessons, bibliographies, illustrations, and resources. Available on loan from the California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, CA 94118, 415/750-7164.

John C. Campbell Folk School. Mountain Valley Music: Grassroots Music from Western North Carolina and North Georgia. Folklorist Doug Day wrote the booklet for this cassette packet that features a rich sampler, shape note to string band, gospel to bluegrass. On 1991 Selected List of American Folk Music and Folklore Recordings, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. Contact Campbell Folk School, Route 1, Box 14-A, Brasstown, NC 28902, 704/837-2775.

Celsor, Sharon. Folk Artists in School Programs Funded by the Folk Arts Program, 1976-1992. Washington, DC: Folk Arts Program, National Endowment for the Arts, 25 pp., 1992. Brief descriptions of NEA-funded programs. Available from Folk Arts Program, NEA, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Suite 710, Washington, DC 20506, 202/682-5449, free.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Learning About Folklife: The U.S. Virgin Islands and Senegal. Washington, D.C.: Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies, 1992. Educational kit contains four-part video, maps, photographs, audio cassettes, line illustrations, teachers' guide, the 1990 Festival of American Folklife Program book, Folklife and Fieldwork, and American Folklife: A Commonwealth of Culture, the latter two published by the American Folklife Center. Available from the center, Smithsonian Institution, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, SW, Suite 2600, Washington DC 20560, 202/287-3424, $50.

Center for Southern Folklore and Division of Curriculum Development for Memphis City Schools. The Heritage of Black Music in Memphis: A Teaching Resource Packet. Memphis: Center for Southern Folklore, 27 pp., 1986. Defines musical traditions of Memphis, offers short personal experience narratives, suggests activities. Available from the center, 209 Beale St., Memphis, TN 38103, 901/525-3655.

Children's Literature Association Quarterly. Special folklore section, Vol. 11, no. 3, Fall 1986.

Condon, Kathleen. All About Fish. New York: South Street Seaport Museum, 15 pp., 1992. This teacher packet for grades 1-3 provides activity sheets, glossary, bibliography for classes touring Fulton Fish Market. Available from the museum, 207 Front St., New York, NY 10038, 212/669-9400.

Council, Sally, Patricia Gantt, and Beverly Patterson, ed. Folklife, Vol. 31, no. 1 of Tar Heel Junior Historian, 45 pp., Fall 1991. Fine photographs illustrate articles by several folklorists on varied aspects of state folklife. Distributed to all eighth-graders in public schools. Contact North Carolina Museum of History, 109 E. Jones St., Raleigh, NC 27601-2807.

Country Music Foundation. CMF has a series of suitcases available on loan. Titles include Country Music Is for Kids, Country Music Masters, From Tin Foil to Stereo, Nashville Sounds, Tennessee Traditions: Music and Dance, and Words and Music. Kits include cassette tapes, lesson plans, and activity sheets for K- 12. Order from CMF, 4 Music Square East, Nashville, TN 37203, 615/256-1639, postage and handling.

Cutting-Baker, Holly, et al. Family Folklore: A Model Course Outline for Secondary Schools and Colleges. Washington, DC: Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies, Smithsonian Institution, nd. Available from the center, Smithsonian Institution, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, SW, Suite 2600, Washington, DC 20560, 202/287-3424.

Davis, Shari, and Benny Ferdman. Nourishing the Heart: A Guide to Intergenerational Arts Projects in the Schools. New York: City Lore, 114 pp., 1993. Encourages bringing senior citizens into classrooms to engage young and old in joint ventures to recreate their own and their communities' cultural heritage in visual arts, theater, and writing projects. Available from City Lore, 72 E. First St., New York, NY 10003, 212/529- 1955, $10.

DeGarmo, Todd. Balsam Traditions. Blue Mountain Lake and Glens Falls, NY: Adirondack Museum and Crandall Public Library, a series of five posters, 1992. Developed for the museum's Adirondack Studies Program, the posters use historic and contemporary images and quotations to depict the traditional uses of balsam fir in the Adirondack region. One poster per topic: balsam bed, balsam cures, Christmas, souvenirs, and balsam bee. Contact Todd DeGarmo, Director of Folklife Programs, Crandall Public Library, 251 Glen St., Glens Falls, NY 12801, $10.

DeVane, Dwight Jr., and Ormond H. Loomis. A Report on Folk Arts Programming in Florida Schools. White Springs: Bureau of Florida Folklife Programs, 57 pp., 1982. Describes in detail a 1981 project in Hillsborough County schools and includes plans, schedules, resources for developing units. Order from FFP, P.O. Box 265, White Springs, FL 32096, 904/397-2192.

Falk, Lisa. Cultural Reporter Handbook. A K-12 teaching guide to help students report on the state and substance of their communities and understand their past and present. Prepared in conjunction with the American Encounters Quincentenary exhibit at the National Museum of American History. In production. Contact Publications Division, National Museum of American History, Room MBB-66, MRC 646, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560.

Folksong in the Classroom. This newsletter published three times annually for a network of teachers of history, literature, music, and the humanities advocates using folk songs as primary source materials for studying our own and other cultures. Includes discussions, suggestions about classroom applications, news from teachers, supplementary materials, discographies, song sheets, etc. Available by subscription, P.O. Box 264, Holyoke, MA 01041, individuals $7; institutions $12.

Foxfire. The Georgia-based institute has dozens of publications by students and teachers. Current emphasis is on training teachers. The journal Hands On ($5 per issue) publishes teachers' and Foxfire trainers' projects. Contact the Foxfire Fund, Inc., P.O. Box 541, Mountain City, GA 30562, 706/746-5828.

Gantt, Patricia M. A Curriculum Guide for Eight-Hand Sets and Holy Steps: Early Dance Tunes and Songs of Praise from North Carolina's Black Tradition. Raleigh: Folklife Section of North Carolina Arts Council, 24 pp., 1989. Distributed to all public schools in the state along with the reissue of the LP by the same name, this guide was designed specifically for eighth grade. Provides glossary, activities, bibliography, resources. The LP was included in American Folk Music and Folklore Recordings 1989: A Selected List, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. Contact the Folklife Section, Department of Cultural Resources, Raleigh, NC 27601-2807, 919/733-7897.

Gardner, Joel R. Using Oral History and Folklore in the Classroom. Vol. XI, no. 1-2, Spring-Fall 1990 of New Jersey Folklore Society Review, 16 pp. Includes bibliography, checklists. Order from NJFS, P.O. Box 8303, Cherry Hill, NJ 08002, $4.

Graham, Andrea. Nevada Folklife: A Curriculum Unit for Junior High and Middle School Students. Reno: Nevada Arts Council, 40 pp., 1991. Introduces students and teachers to folklife and Nevada traditions, especially in the language arts and social studies. Includes resources, bibliographies. Available from the council, 602 North Curry St., Carson City, NV 89703, 775/687-6680, free.

Groce, Nancy, ed. Generation to Generation: The Staten Island Folk Artists in the Schools Program. Staten Island, NY: Staten Island Council on the Arts, 32 pp., 1985. Groce and elementary students summarize their study with folk artists and family members. Available from SICA, One Edgewater Plaza, Room 212, Staten Island, NY 10305, 718/447-4485.

Groce, Nancy, ed. View from Staten Island: The 1985-86 Folk Arts in the Schools Program. Staten Island, NY: Staten Island Council on the Arts, 40 pp., 1986. Groce and elementary students present the results of their folk arts project. Available from SICA, One Edgewater Plaza, Room 212, Staten Island, NY 10305, 718/447-4485.

Heisley, Michael. Mexican and Mexican American Folklore Studies: Resources for Los Angeles-Area Classroom Teachers. 10 pp., 1991. An annotated bibliography to help teachers learn about folklore on their own and to incorporate folklore into K-12 classes. Available from Heisley, P.O. Box 41558, Los Angeles, CA 90041-0558.

Hinton, Sam. Folksong in the Chronological Integrating of History, Literature, and Geography. nd. Compiled in response to California mandated K-12 social sciences curriculum, this chronology of traditional music set against an American history timeline is handy for any state. Order from California State Department of Education, P.O. Box 271, Sacramento, CA 95802-0271, (ISBN 08011-0712-1), $6.

Hufford, Mary. A Tree Smells Like Peanut Butter: Folk Artists in a City School. Trenton: New Jersey State Council on the Arts, 64 pp., 1979. A compilation of a folklorist's residency in a Camden middle school that shows how folk arts embody community values. Available from the council, 109 W. State St., Trenton, NJ 08625, $3.

Hunt, Marjorie, Paul Wagner, and Steve Zeitlin. The Grand Generation. 28-min., 1993. This new film features six older people talking about their lives and making obvious the wealth of experience to be gained from interviewing older people. Distributed by Filmakers Library, 124 E. 40th St., New York, NY 10016, 212/808-4980, 16-mm and VHS video, $55 rental; $295 sales. See also the book by the same title by Marjorie Hunt, Mary Hufford, and Steve Zeitlin, 1988. Describes in detail techniques, sensitive questions, and presentations of findings for students interviewing older people. Available from University of Washington Press, P.O. Box 50096, Seattle, WA 98145, 206/543- 4050, $25 cloth; $14.95 paper, $3 shipping. The Grand Generation Interviewing Guide and Questionnaire, published by the Smithsonian Institution, 16 pp., 1987, is also available. The booklet for grades 6-12 offers guidelines for collecting folklore from older people. Also see the Family Folklore Interviewing Guide and Questionnaire, 16 pp., 1977, for grades 5-12. Both booklets available from Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), Publications, 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW, Quad 3146, Washington, DC 20560.

Hunt, Marjorie, Mary Hufford, and Steve Zeitlin. The Grand Generation: Interviewing Guide and Questionnaire. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 16 pp., 1987. Booklet for grades 6- 12 offers guidelines for collecting folklore from older people, sample questions, ways to save and present findings. (Authors published a book under this title as well.) Also see the Family Folklore Interviewing Guide and Questionnaire, 16 pp., 1977, for grades 5-12. Both booklets available from Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), Publications, 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW, Quad 3146, Washington, DC 20560.

International House. Folklife All Around Us. nd. In-class lessons examine traditions elementary students experience. Folklore and Folk Culture in Multi-Cultural Philadelphia. nd. For secondary social studies or English classes. Publications, performances, and workshops available from the staff. Contact Folklife Center, International House, 3701 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, 215/387-5125.

Kansas State Historical Society. Varied interpretive exhibits and traveling resource trunks, some prepared by folklorists, are available on loan. Topics include farm culture, quilting, ethnic experiences, traditional music. Contact Education and Outreach Division, Kansas State Historical Society, 6425 SW Sixth, Topeka, KS 66615-1099, 913/272-8681.

Kaplan, Anne R. Minnesota Folklife. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society, 39 pp., 1983. Vol. II, no. 3 of Roots, Publications for Young People. Overview for students of the state's folklife, celebrations, storytelling, folk arts, lots of photos, no curriculum.

Kozma, LuAnne. Folkpatterns Leader's Guide: A Cultural Heritage Program. East Lansing: Michigan State University Cooperative Extension Service (#4-H 1506), 52 pp., 1991. This recently revised guide and activity pack is helpful for teachers as well as 4-H leaders. Focuses on involving students with tradition bearers and teaching documentation skills. Order from MSU Bulletin Office, Box 231, East Lansing, MI 48824, $12.

Lambrecht, Winifred, revised edition. A Guide to Folklife and Folk Arts Programs for Schools and Cultural Institutions. Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, 40 pp., nd. Acquaints reader with Rhode Island folklife and folk artists and ways to integrate them into K-12 curriculum. Bibliography, resources, guidelines, list of artists. Available from the council, 95 Cedar St., Suite 103, Providence, RI 02903, 401/222-6996.

Lornell, Kip. Introducing American Folk Music. Madison, WI: Brown and Benchmark, 251 pp., 1993. An excellent new compendium with lots of photos, some curriculum ideas, and thorough overview of traditional American music and its influence on pop music. Very useful for K-12 classroom as well as music teachers. Audio tape also available. Order from publisher, 2460 Kerper Blvd., Dubuque, IA 52001, 800/338-5578, $29 for book, $12.32 for audio tape.

MacDowell, Marsha, ed. Folk Arts in Education: A Resource Handbook. East Lansing: Michigan State University Museum, 350 pp., 1987. A basic folklore education source with reports from around the country, lots of ideas and resources adaptable for any region and all grades. Order from MSU Museum, East Lansing, MI 48224, $18.95 w/ binder; $14.95 w/out binder.

MacDowell, Marsha. Heritage Gardening (#4-H 1279), Family Folklore (#4-H 1330), and Foodways (#4-H 1329) are in the series 4-H Folkpatterns Project. East Lansing: Michigan State University Cooperative Extension Service, 25 pp. plus activity sheets, 1985. Developed for 4-H leaders, these handy kits work well in the classroom too. (See entry for LuAnne Kozma, above, for 4-H Leader's Guide.) Order from MSU Bulletin Office, Box 231, East Lansing, MI 48824, $3 each.

MacDowell, Marsha. Hmong Folk Arts: A Guide for Teachers. East Lansing: Michigan State University Museum, 47 pp., 1985. Helpful guide for teachers of all grades to introduce Hmong textiles to students. Detailed drawings of stitches. Order from MSU Museum, East Lansing, MI 48224, $10.

McAbee, Patti, and Kate Townsend, eds. Incorporating Local Culture Into the Classroom. Published with Savannah Valley Cultural Conservation Consortium, 1991. Kit of in-service training materials includes interviews with Foxfire's Eliot Wigginton, oral historian Mark Wetherington, folklorist/historian Charles Joyner, and folklorist Gail Matthews-DeNatale. Available on loan from the McCormick Arts Council, P.O. 488, McCormick, SC 29835.

McKissick Museum. Jubilation! African American Celebration in the Southeast: An Educator's Guide. Columbia: University of South Carolina, 53 pp., 1993. Published for an exhibit, this guide can stand alone and includes curriculum materials and lesson plans, photographs, plus a bibliography of materials and videos for children and adults. Available from the museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, 803/777-7251, $10.

McKissick Museum. Row Upon Row: Sea Grass Baskets of the South Carolina Lowcountry. Columbia: University of South Carolina, 2nd ed., 100 pp., 1991. Deeply developed curriculum kit for K-12 with slides, video, reference materials, curriculum, photos, and basket examples. Available on loan from the museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, 803/777-7251.

Matthews-DeNatale, Gail. Building Bridges Between School and Community, 1993. A 15-minute video and 16-page printed guide for teachers that explore issues in education reform and possibilities for drawing on local culture to increase involvement between communities and schools. Produced by the Rockefeller Foundation-funded REACH project, distributed by the McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29268, 803/777-7251, $10.

Matthews, Gail, and Betty Belanus. Crossroads of Clay: The Southern Alkaline-Glazed Stoneware Tradition. Columbia: McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, 1990. A kit with three grade-level components, slides, video, bibliography, curriculum, photos, and pottery. Available on loan from the museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, 803/777-7251.

Matthews, Gail, and Don Patterson. Learning from Your Community: Folklore and Video in the Schools. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Arts Commission, Folk Arts Program, 65 pp., 1991. This classroom curriculum guide for grades 4 to 8 is based upon a folklorist's and a videographer's work with South Carolina students on the effects of Hurricane Hugo. Offers lots of tips about student collection and video projects. Available from the McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, 803/777-7251, $5.

Moonsammy, Rita Zorn. Passing It On: Folk Artists and Education in Cumberland County, New Jersey. Trenton: New Jersey State Council on the Arts, 176 pp., 1992. Fine photographs illustrate this compilation of a long-term folk artist in schools program, helpful for all grade levels. Features curriculum outlines, FAIE model, county history, and portraits of individual artists. Order from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. 225 West State Street, P.O. Box 306, Trenton, NJ 08625, 609-292-6130, $16.

Mundell, Kathleen, ed. Folk Arts in Education in New York State. A special publication by the New York Folklore Society, 48 pp., 1987. Four folklorists describe their school programs. Available from NY Folklore Society, 632 West Buffalo St., Ithaca, NY 14850.

Music Educators National Conference. Sounds of the World-- Music of East Asia: Chinese, Korean, and Japanese Traditions in the United States. Study guide by William A. Anderson, 1989. Sounds of the World--Music of Eastern Europe: Albanian, Greek, and South Slavic Traditions in the United States. Study guide by Patricia Shehan Campbell, 1989. Sounds of the World--Music of the Middle East: Arab, Persian/Iranian, and Turkish Traditions in the United States. Study guide by Sally Monsour, 1990. Sets have three cassettes and study guides with narration, interviews, and music samples for elementary grades and above. Included in American Folk Music and Folklore Recordings:A Selected List for 1989 and 1990. American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. Available from MENC, 1902 Association Dr., Reston, VA 22091-1597.

Music Educators National Conference. A Tribute to Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. Study guide by Will Schmid, published in cooperation with the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, 1991. Teaching kit contains a 64-page teacher guide and a 48-page student text with photographs, quizzes, and activity and project guides focusing on the social context of the performers' lives. These curriculum enrichment materials are correlated with A Vision Shared and The Original Vision audio cassette, CD, or video. Available from MENC, 1902 Association Dr., Reston, VA 22091-1597, $13 for teacher's guide (#3065); $7.50 for student text (#3064); discount for MENC members.

National Public Radio. Class of 2000: Family Stories. Washington, DC: National Public Radio, 1991. Folklorist Betty Belanus wrote the 68-page teacher's guide accompanying an audio tape collection of thirteen segments on family stories broadcast on NPR. Contact NPR Audience Outreach, 2025 M St., NW, Washington, DC 20036, 202/822-2323, $30 for tapes; $5 for guide.

National Public Radio. Class of 2000: The Prejudice Puzzle. Washington, DC: National Public Radio, 1990. Folklorist Betty Belanus wrote the 61-page teacher's guide accompanying an audio tape collection of thirteen segments broadcast on NPR on helping children deal with prejudice. Contact NPR Audience Outreach, 2025 M St., NW, Washington, DC 20036, 202/822-2323, $30 for tapes; $5 for guide.

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Folklife in Education: A Guide for North Carolina Teachers. Raleigh, NC, Pub. No. 27603-1712, 87 pp. Supplements previous folklife curriculum for the first state to adopt a sequential, competency- based K-12 folklife curriculum. Includes bibliography.

Oral History Center. After a decade, this group has a healthy list of products and publications, including curriculum packets and a selected bibliography for teachers and pupils. The Oral History Center, 186 1/2 Hampshire St., Cambridge, MA 02139, 617/661-8288.

Oregon Folklife Program. Oregon Folklife Series. A series of educational kits on ethnic folklife. Each kit includes a table-top exhibit, student magazines to be used as text for the unit, a teacher's guide, items by Oregon folk artists, maps, resource books and articles, children's books, videos, cassettes, and other related materials. These may be rented through the Oregon Historical Society Education & Outreach at (503) 306-5280.

Parker, Diana and Charles Camp. Folklore in Education: Readings for Secondary School Teachers. Maryland Arts Council Folklife Program, 40 pp., 1979. Reprints of articles from education journals.

Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Toward a Better Balance: Curriculum Guide for Multicultural Education. 227 pp., 1988. This thorough guide to studying and appreciating various ethnicities includes a section on migration lore and another on "Our Global Family." Comes in two parts for grades K-6 and 7-12. Provides examples for classroom activities and a good rationale for multicultural studies. Order from Pennsylvania Ethnic Heritage Studies Center, 405 Bellefield Annex, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

Philadelphia Folklore Project. Publishes 8-12 minute slide-tape shows on video profiling local folk artists and a wide range of books, reports, and working papers. The PFP rents traveling exhibitions which can be borrowed by schools as well. The PFP publishes a newsletter, Works in Progress, 1987-present, issued 2-3 times a year. Subscriptions included in membership ($25 per year + sliding scale. Members also receive news mailings. Call or write, 1304 Wharton St., Philadelphia, PA 19147, 215/468-7871.

Pioneer Valley Folklore Society. Drawing from the Well: Oral History and Folk Arts in the Classroom and Community. 106 pp., 1990. Edited by Randi Silnutzer and Beth Gildin Watrous. Combines folklore and oral history strategies. Offers bibliography and resources. Available from the Pioneer Valley Folklore Society, PO Box 267, Montague, MA 01351, 413/367-0101, $12 plus $2.50 shipping.

Rhoads, Loretta Van Winkle. Your Ear Is Older Than Your Grandfather: Folklore and Folk History for the Florida Classroom. Tampa: Arts Council of Tampa-Hillsborough County, 105 pp., 1987. Developed for Tampa fourth-graders but useful for all of Florida, this well-organized resource contains free-standing chapters on topics such as children's folklore, family folklore, and ethnic folklore. Each section has a bibliography and resource guide.

Rhoads, Roxanne. Folklife in Oklahoma: A Guide for Teachers. 32 pp., 1989. Written in conjunction with 1989 folklife celebration, the guide offers concise sections on topics such as foodways and family lore.

Robinson, Uaporn Ang. Southeast Asian New Year Celebrations: An Instructional Guide for Grades 4-6. Washington, DC: Office of Education, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, 96 pp., 1991. A varied collection of celebratory lore, activities, and local resources. Available on loan from Office of Education, Room 212, MRC 158, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, 20560, $3 handling fee.

Rosenberg, Jan. A Bibliography of Works in Folklore and Education Published Between 1929 and 1990. Compiled for the Folklore and Education Section of the American Folklore Society, this bibliography covers the history of education, intercultural education, general folklore collections, folklore and education. Available on diskette or in 24-page hard copy from Jan Rosenberg, P.O. Box 1093, Texarkana, AR 75504, $5.

Rosenberg, Jan. Folklife Study Guide series, 1990-91, for the Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities Council, Inc. Short introductions to folklife, several genres, and local folk artists that give definitions, student objectives, activities, bibliographies for grades 4-12 developed by folklorist Jan Rosenberg. Order from TRAHC, P.O. Box 1171, Texarkana, AR/TX 75504-1171, 903/792-8681.

Rosenberg, Jan. Palm Beach County Folklife: A Guide for Fourth Grade Teachers. West Palm Beach: School Board of Palm Beach County, 46 pp., 1987. Includes definitions, lesson plans with objectives, student worksheets, activities, resources. Helpful for other grades as well. Available from Jan Rosenberg, P.O. Box 1093, Texarkana, AR 75504.

Rosenberg, Jan. Palm Beach County Folklife: A Slide Presentation. West Palm Beach: School Board of Palm Beach County, 24 pp. plus slides. This and a rural arts version are available from Jan Rosenberg, P.O. Box 1093, Texarkana, AR 75504.

Scheer, Virginia. Catskills Folk Music Teacher's Guide. Arkville, NY: Erpf Catskill Cultural Center, 28 pp., 1990. Designed to involve elementary students directly in learning traditional tunes and dance steps, with bibliography and roster of musicians and resource people. Available from Catskills Folk Music Project, Roxbury, NY 12474, 607/526-7049.

Sharrow, Greg, ed. Many Cultures, One People: A Multicultural Handbook About Vermont for Teachers. Middlebury: Vermont Folklife Center, 271 pp., 1992. A fat book filled with Vermont history, oral histories, songs, activities, photos, definitions, samples, resources. A good model for other states. Available from the center, P.O. Box 442, Middlebury, VT 05753, 802/388-4964, $12.95.

Simons, Elizabeth Radin. Student Worlds, Student Words: Teaching Writing Through Folklore. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 232 pp., 1990. A teacher and a folklorist, Simons offers good background on contemporary folklore and detailed lesson plans for high school writing and folklore studies. A valuable resource. Available from Heinemann, 361 Hanover St., Portsmouth, NH 03801- 3959, 800/541-2086, $18.95.

Smithsonian Institution, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. Resource Guide for Teachers, 84 pp., 1993. Lists over 400 resources from Smithsonian museums, Reading Is Fundamental, National Gallery of Art, the Kennedy Center. Includes kits, bibliographies, videos, recordings, slide sets, many free. Order from OESE, Arts and Industries Building, Room 1163, MRC 402, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, free.

Smithsonian Institution, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. Blues in America: A Social History, 1993. A multimedia teaching kit that traces blues from the Mississippi Delta to contemporary performers. The portfolio contains background essays, reproductions of primary sources, audio cassette, and teacher guide. A special accompanying study guide (not included in kit) may be purchased separately. Available from Golden Owl Publishing Company, P.O. Box 503, Amawalk, NY 10501, 914/962- 6911, or fax 914/962-0034, $29.95; $7.95 for study guide.

Southern Folklore. "Folklife in Education," Vol. 48, No. 1, 94 pp., 1991. Guest editor Nancy Nusz introduces a volume dedicated to folklife in education issues. Available from the University Press of Kentucky, 663 S. Limestone St., Lexington, KY 40508-4008.

Stanley, Tom, ed. Across Generations: Catawba Potters and Their Art. Rock Hill, SC: Winthrop University, 1992. Gail Matthews-DeNatale consulted with Winthrop Galleries to develop kits for educators with ethnographies, photos, reference materials, slides, video, pottery available on loan from Winthrop Galleries, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC 29733, 803/323- 2493.

Tartaglia, Barbara and Gary Stanton. Stout Hearts: Traditional Oak Basket Makers of the South Carolina Upcountry. Columbia: McKissick Museum, University of South Carolina, ca 1988. A kit for K-12 with slides, video, reference materials, curriculum, photos, basket examples available on loan to South Carolina schools. Available on loan from the museum, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, 803/777-7251.

Taylor, David A. Documenting Maritime Folklife: A Guide. Washington, DC: Library of Congress American Folklife Center, 81 pp., 1992. Taylor carefully details how and what to document and includes model forms and bibliography. Order from Superintendent of Documents, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 (#7046), $7.50.

Traditions. A new semiannual folklore journal that documents and promotes West Virginia's rich mountain heritage. The journal was developed as a direct result of the 1992 West Virginia Humanities Council's Summer Seminar for Teachers held at Fairmont Stat College. It is especially designed to appeal to K- 12 teachers. Available by subscription from Traditions, Fairmont State College, 1201 Locust Ave., Fairmont, WV 26554, $6.

Trumpold, Caroline, and Gordon Kellenberger. Time and Tradition. Amana, IA: Amana Community Schools, 79 pp., 1990. Adapted by Amana schools, this guide offers K-12 curriculum, resources, activities, bibliography, collection forms. Kellenberger is Smithsonian Folklife Program Community Scholar. Available from Amana Arts Guild, Box 114, Amana, IA 52203, $10.

Vermont Folklife Center. The center's educational services include publications, teacher training, and audio and video tapes with study guides, including Our Town: Recording and Presenting Local History and Folklife--Teacher Handbook, On My Own: The Traditions of Daisy Turner, Legacy of the Lake, Journey's End, As the Twig Is Bent, Vermont Folk Artists, The Vermont Country Store, The General Store in Vermont. Available for rental and sale from the center, P.O. Box 442, Middlebury, VT 05753, 802/388-4964, prices vary.

Weidner, Tim. Harvesting Heritage: A Teacher's Guide. Binghamton, NY: Roberson Museum and Science Center, 41 pp., 1990. Published in conjunction with the exhibit "Folk Art of the Southern Tier," this guide provides a good model from a well- defined cultural region with varied folk arts and artists. Along with a sampler of local cultures, African-American, Chinese, Czech, etc., are an overview of cultures, portraits of specific folk artists, a helpful diagram for teachers displaying how folklore fits into education, class projects. Order from the museum, 30 Front St., Binghamton, NY 13905, 607/772-0669.

Wigginton, Eliot. Foxfire series. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1972-80. The Foxfire project has resulted in numerous books of student-collected lore.

Woodside, Jane, and Gail Matthews. Southern Dance Traditions: Communities in Motion. Johnson City: East Tennessee State University, 1990. Developed as a teacher's guide for a conference on dance, this publication may also be used independently.

World Music Press. Los Mariachis! An Introduction to Mexican Mariachi Music. 1989. From Rice Paddies and Temple Yards: Traditional Music of Vietnam. Study guide by Patricia Shehan Campbell, 1990. Silent Temples, Songful Hearts: Traditional Music of Cambodia. Study guide by Sam-Ang Sam and Patricia Shehan Campbell, 144 pp., plus cassette tape, 1991. Educators and ethnomusicologists, the authors present traditional culture and music for music or social studies classes. Includes maps, photos, glossary, bibliography, resources. These cassette/booklet sets are for classrooms fifth grade and up. Cited in American Folk Music and Folklore Recordings: A Selected List for 1989, 1990, and 1991, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. Available from World Music Press, P.O. Box 2565, Danbury, CT 06813-2565, 203/748-1131.

In addition to the selections listed above, there are numerous other items that have been prepared with classroom applications in mind. Some, such as documentary videos and sound recordings, are inherently instructional as primary source materials. Many items include brief discussion guides, extensive notes, and other background materials.

Among the useful catalogs to consult are:

Appalshop Film and Video
306 Madison Street
Whitesburg, KY 41858
606/633-0108

Center for Southern Folklore
209 Beale St.
Memphis, TN 38103
901/525-3655

Down Home Records
10341 San Pablo Ave
El Cerrito, CA 94530
415/525-1494

Folk Recordings Selected from the
Archive of Folk Culture
Motion Picture, Broadcasting and
Recorded Sound Division
Library of Congress
Washington, DC 20540

Jackdaw Publications
Golden Owl Publishing
P.O. Box 503
Amawalk, NY 10501

Music Educators National Conference
1902 Association Drive
Reston, VA 22091-1597

The Rounder Records Group
One Camp Street
Cambridge, MA 02140
617/354-0700
fax 617/491-1970

Smithsonian/Folkways Recordings
Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
955 L'Enfant Plaza, Suite 2600, MRC 914
Washington, DC 20560
202/287-3262

West Music Company
P.O. Box 5521
Coralville, IA 52241
1/800/397/9378

World Music Press
P.O. Box 2565
Danbury, CT 06813-2565
203/748-1131

[Complete listing available in the Folklife Sourcebook: A Directory of Folklife Resources in the United States ]

Return to Table of Contents

PART II
Agencies with Folklife Programs

NATIONAL PROGRAMS

A. Advisory Assistance

Bank Street/City Lore Center for Folk Arts in Education
Bank Street College of Education
610 W. 112th St.
New York, NY 10025
212/529-1955
FAX 212/529-5062

American Folklore Society
Folklore in Education Section
4350 N. Fairfax Dr., Suite 640
Arlington, VA 22203
703/528-1902
(mail correspondence suggested for forwarding to the section's chairperson)

Library of Congress
American Folklife Center
Education Initiative
101 Independence Ave, SE
Washington, DC 20540-4610
202/707-6590
FAX 202/707-2076

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Smithsonian Institution
955 L'Enfant Plaza, Suite 2600
Washington, DC 20560
202/287-3424
FAX 202/287-3699

B. Grants

Folk Arts Program
National Endowment for the Arts
1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Room 710
Washington, DC 20506
202/682-5449

Fund for Folk Culture
P.O. Box 1566
Santa Fe, NM 87508
505/984-2534

REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Folklorists and folk arts coordinators in the agencies below develop regional programs frequently focused on arts in education.

Southern Arts Federation
181 14th Street, NE, Suite 400
Atlanta, GA 30309
404/874-7244
FAX 404/873-2148

New England Foundation for the Arts
678 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
617/492-2914

New England Folklife Center of Lowell
400 Foot of John St.
Lowell, MA 01852-1195
617/459-1131

Western Folklife Center
P.O. Box 888
Elko, NV 89801
702/738-7508
FAX 702/738-7508

Western States Arts Federation
236 Montezuma Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505/988-1166
FAX 505/982-9307

STATE- AND COMMUNITY-BASED PROGRAMS

The following is a partial list of organizations and institutions with an on-going programmatic commitment to folklife study, conservation, and presentation. Ask for the folklorist or folklife program when contacting the agencies below.

A complete listing is available through the Folklife Sourcebook including listings by state of archives, university and college programs, societies, recording companies, and other useful resources for teachers and classroom applications.

ALABAMA

Alabama Center for Traditional Culture
410 North Hull St.
Montgomery, AL 36104
205/242-3601
FAX 205/240-3269

Alabama Folklife Program
Alabama Council on the Arts
One Dexter Avenue
Montgomery, AL 36130-4076
205/242-4076

ALASKA

Alaska State Council on the Arts
411 West 4th Ave., Suite 1E
Anchorage, AK 99501
907/279-1558

Institute of Alaskan Native Arts
P.O. Box 80583
Fairbanks, AK 99798
907/456-7491

AMERICAN SAMOA

American Samoa Council on the Arts
P.O. Box 1540
Pago Pago, American Samoa 96799
684/633-4347
FAX 9011-684/633-2059

ARIZONA

Arizona Commission on the Arts
417 West Roosevelt St.
Phoenix, AZ 85003
602/255-5882

The Southwest Folklife Center
The University of Arizona
1053 E. 8th St., Suite B
Tucson, AZ 85721
602/621-3392

ARKANSAS

Ozark Folk Center
Mountain View, AR 72569
501/269-8102

Texarkana Regional Arts and Humanities Council
P.O. Box 1171
Texarkana, AR 75504-1171
903/792-8681

CALIFORNIA

Craft and Folk Art Museum
5814 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036
213/937-5544

Folk Arts Program
City of Los Angeles
Cultural Affairs Department
433 W. Spring St., 10th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90013
213/485-6759
FAX 213/485-6835

Southwest Museum
P.O. Box 558
Los Angeles, CA 90041
213/221-2164
FAX 213/224-8223

Folk Arts Program
Cultural Arts Division
City of Oakland
475 14th Street, 9th Floor
Oakland, CA 94612
415/273-2103

California Arts Council
1901 Broadway, Suite A
Sacramento, CA 95818
916/445-1530

COLORADO

Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities
6901 Wadsworth
Arvada, CO 80003
303/431-3080
FAX 719/634-4180

Museum of Western Colorado
P.O. Box 20000-5020
Grand Junction, CO 81502-5020
303/434-9814

CONNECTICUT

Connecticut Institute for Community Research
999 Asylum Ave., Suite 500
Hartford, CT 06105-2476
203/278-2044

DELAWARE

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control
Division of Parks and Recreation
P.O. Box 1401
Dover, DE 19903
302/739-4413
FAX 302/739-3917

Folklore and Ethnic Art Center
129 Memorial Hall
University of Delaware
Newark, DE 19711

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

D.C. Commission on Arts and Humanities
410 8th St., NW
Washington, DC 20004
202/724-5613

FLORIDA

Folklife Program
Historical Museum of Southern Florida
101 W. Flagler St.
Miami, FL 33130
305/375-1492

Florida Folklife Program
Florica Department of State
R.A. Gray Building
500 S. Bonough St. Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250
850/487-2333 or 800-847-7278
FAX 850/922-0496

GEORGIA

Southern Arts Federation
181 14th St. NE, Suite 400
Suite 500
Atlanta, GA 30309
404/874-7244
FAX 404/873-2148

Folklife Program
Georgia Council for the Arts
260 14th NW, Suite 401
Atlanta, GA 30318-5360
404/651-7920

The Foxfire Fund, Inc.
P.O. Box 541
Mountain City, GA 30562
706/746-5828
Fax 706/746-5829

GUAM

Guam Council on Arts & Humanities
P.O. Box 2950
Agana, Guam 96910
671/477-7413
Fax 011-671/477-5651

HAWAII

State Foundation on Culture & Arts
335 Merchant St., Room 202
Honolulu, HI 96813
808/586-0302
FAX 808/586-0308

IDAHO

Idaho Commission on the Arts
Statehouse Mail
304 West State Street
Boise, ID 83720
208/334-2119
FAX 208/334-2488

Idaho Folklife Center
Idaho State Historical Society
610 North Julia Davis Drive
Boise, ID 83702

ILLINOIS

Folk and Ethnic Arts Program
Illinois Arts Council
State of Illinois Center
100 West Randolph, Suite 10-500
Chicago, IL 60601
312/814-6750

INDIANA

Conner Prairie Pioneer Settlement
30 Conner Lane
Noblesville, IN 46060

IOWA

State Historical Society of Iowa
State Historical Museum
600 E. Locust
Des Moines, IA 50319
515/281-7650
FAX 515/282-0502

Community & Cultural Heritage Programs
Iowa Arts Council
State Historical Society of Iowa
600 East Locust Street
Des Moines, IA 50319
515/281-7650
FAX 515/282-0502
EMAIL: Steve Ohrn, sohrn@max.state.ia.us

Amana Folklife Center
Box 114
High Amana, IA 52203
319/622-3678

KANSAS

Kansas State Historical Society
120 West 10th St.
Topeka, KS 66612
913/272-8681

KENTUCKY

Kentucky Folklife Program
Kentucky Arts Council
31 Fountain Place
Frankfurt, KY 40602-3016
502/564-3016
FAX 502/564-4701

LOUISIANA

Louisiana Folklife Program
Division of the Arts
P.O. Box 44247
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
504/342-8180

MAINE

Maine Arts Commission
55 Capitol St.
State House Station 25
Augusta, ME 04333
202/289-2724

Northeast Archive of Folklore and Oral History
University of Maine
South Stevens Hall
Orono, ME 04469-0158
207/581-1891

MARYLAND

Maryland State Arts Council
601 North Howard St., 1st Floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
410/333-8232

Cultural Conservation Program
Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development
Division of Historical and Cultural Programs
100 Community Place
Crownsville, MD 21032-2023
410/ 514-7600
FAX 410/987-4071

MASSACHUSETTS

Massachusetts Cultural Council
260 Boylston Street, 2nd Floor
Boston, MA 02116-4600
617/727-3668

New England Foundation for the Arts
678 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
617/492-2914

Pioneer Valley Folklore Society
P.O. Box 710
Greenfield, MA 01302
413/774-4141

New England Folklife Center of Lowell
400 Foot of John Street
Lowell, MA 01852-1195

MICHIGAN

Folkpatterns Program
The Cooperative Extension Service
The 4-H Youth Program
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48224

Michigan Folk Arts Program
Michigan State University Museum
East Lansing, MI 48824
517/355-0368
FAX 517/336-2846

MINNESOTA

Minnesota State Arts Board
432 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55102
612/297-2603

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi Arts Commission
239 N. Lamar Street
Jackson, MS 39201
601/359-6030

Center for the Study of Southern Culture
University of Mississippi
University, MS 38677
601/232-5993

MISSOURI

Missouri Folkarts Program
Conley House, University of Missouri
602 Sanford St.
Columbia, MO 65211
314/882-6296

MONTANA

Montana Arts Council
35 S. Last Chance Gulch
Helena, MT 59601
406/444-6430

NEBRASKA

Nebraska Arts Council
Joslyn Carriage House
3838 Davenport St.
Omaha, NE 68131-2329
402/595-2540
FAX 402/595-2334

NEVADA

Nevada Arts Council
602 North Curry St.
Carson City, NV 89703
775/687-6680
FAX 702/687-6688

Western Folklife Center
P.O. Box 1570
Elko, NV 89803
775/738-7508
FAX 775/738-2900

NEW HAMPSHIRE

New Hampshire State Council on the Arts
40 N. Main St.
Concord, NH 03301-4974
603/271-2789

NEW JERSEY

Folklife Program
New Jersey Historical Commission
113 W. State St.
Trenton, NJ 08625
609/292-6062

New Jersey State Council on the Arts
225 West State St.
P.O. Box 306
Trenton, NJ 08625
609/292-6130

NEW MEXICO

New Mexico Arts Division
224 E. Palace Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505/827-6490

New Mexico Heritage Center
Box 3X
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003
505/523-7261

NEW YORK

Center for the Study of North Country Folklife
State University of New York at Canton
Canton, N.Y. 13617

City Lore, Inc.
72 East First Street
New York, NY 10003
212/529-1955
FAX 212/529-5062

Center For Traditional Music and Dance
200 Church Street, #303
New York, NY 10013-9052
212/571-1555
FAX 212/571-9052

New York State Council on the Arts
915 Broadway
New York, NY 10010
212/387-7031

Hallockville Folk Arts Center of
Suffolk County
P.O. Box 765
Riverhead, NY 11901
516/298-9782

Queens Council for the Arts
79-01 Park Lane S.
Woodlawn, NY 11421
718/647-3377

NORTH CAROLINA

John C. Campbell Folk School
Brasstown, NC 28902
704/837-2775

Mountain Heritage Center
Western Carolina University
Cullowhee, NC 28728
704/227-7474

Office of Folklife Programs
Department of Cultural Resources
109 East Jones St., Room 316
Raleigh, NC 27611
919/733-7897

NORTH DAKOTA

North Dakota Council on the Arts
Black Building, #606
Fargo, ND 58102
701/237-8959

OHIO

Traditional and Ethnic Arts Program
Ohio Arts Council
695 Bryden Rd.
Columbus, OH 43205
614/461-1132

OKLAHOMA

State Arts Council of Oklahoma
Jim Thorpe Building, Room 640
2101 North Lincoln Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
405/521-2931

OREGON

Oregon Folklife Program
Oregon Historical Society
1200 S.W. Park Ave.
Portland, OR 97205
503/222-1741
FAX 503/306-5290

PENNSYLVANIA

Arts in Education
Pennsylvania Council on the Arts
Finance Building, Rm. 216
Harrisburg, PA 17120
717/787-6883

State Folklife Programs
Pennsylvania Heritage Affairs Commission
309 Forum Bldg.
Harrisburg, PA 17120
717/783-8625

Cultural Conservation Program
Steel Industry Heritage Corporation
338 E. 9th Ave., 1st Floor
Homestead, PA 15120
412/464-4020

Philadelphia Folklore Project
1304 Wharton St.
Philadelphia, PA 19147
215/468-7871
FAX 215/468-7874

PUERTO RICO

Institute for Puerto Rican Culture
P.O. Box 4184
San Juan, Puerto Rico 00905
809/723-2115

Fondo Permanente Para Las Artes
Royal Bank Center, Suite 1417
Avenue Ponce de Leon 255
Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00917
809/751-3822
Fax: 809/751-3297

RHODE ISLAND

Rhode Island Folklife Project
The Old State House
150 Benefit St.
Providence, RI 02903
401/781-5531

Rhode Island State Council on Arts
95 Cedar St., Suite 103
Providence, RI 02903
401/222-6996

SOUTH CAROLINA

McKissick Museum
University of South Carolina
Columbia, SC 29208
803/777-7251

SOUTH DAKOTA

Cultural Heritage Center
South Dakota State Historical Society
900 Governor's Drive
Pierre, SD 57501-2217
605/773-3458
FAX 605/7736041

TENNESSEE

National Association for the Preservation and
Perpetuation of Storytelling
National Storytelling Resource Center
Box 309
Jonesborough, TN 37659
615/753-2171
FAX 615/753-9331

Folklife Project
Norris Dam State Park
Rt 1 Box 500
Lake City, TN 37769
615/426-2998
FAX 615/426-9446

Center for Southern Folklore
209 Beale St.
Memphis, TN 38103
901/525-3655

Folk Arts Program
Tennessee Arts Commission
401 Charlotte Avenue
Nashville, TN 37243-0780
615/532-9795

TEXAS

University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures
801 South Bowie Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
210/458-2300

UTAH

Utah Arts Council
617 E. South Temple
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
801/533-5760

VERMONT

Vermont Folklife Center
Painter House
Box 442
Middlebury, VT 05753
802/388-4964

VIRGINIA

Virginia Foundation for the Humanities
The Virginia Folklife Program
145 Ednam Drive
Charlottesville, VA 22901
804/924-3776

Blue Ridge Institute
Ferrum College
Ferrum, VA 24088
703/365-4416
FAX: 703/365-4203

WASHINGTON

Washington State Folklife Council
Washington State Arts Council
234 E. 8th St.
Olympia, WA 98504-4111
206/753-3860

WEST VIRGINIA

Division of Culture and History
Capitol Complex
Charleston, WV 25305
304/348-0220, ext. 52

Augusta Heritage Center
Davis and Elkins College
Elkins, WV 26241

WISCONSIN

Wisconsin Arts Board
101 E. Wilson St. First Floor
Madison, WI 53703-3422
608/266-2513
FAX: 608/267-0380

Wisconsin Folk Museum
100 S. 2nd St.
Mount Horeb, WI 53572
608/437-3047
or 608/437-4742
FAX 608/437-4724

WYOMING

American Studies Program
P.O. Box 4036
Cooper House
University of Wyoming
Laramie, WY 82071
307/766-6197

Return to Table of Contents

SUGGESTED READINGS IN FOLKLORE AND FOLKLIFE STUDIES

Brunvand, Jan H. The Study of American Folklore: An Introduction. New York: W.W. Norton & Company,m 1968; 3rd edition, 1986

Dargan, Amanda, and Steven Zeitlin. City Play. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers, 1990.

Dorson, Richard M. American Folklore: With Revised Bibliographical Notes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1977.

-------, ed. Folklore and Folklife: An Introduction. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1972.

Knapp, Mary and Herbert. One Potato, Two Potato: The secret Education of American Children. New York: Norton, 1976.

Opie, Iona and Peter. The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren. New York: Oxford University Press, 1969.

Toelken, Barre. The Dynamics of Folklore. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1979.

For a special emphasis on folklorists' fieldwork techniques:

Allen, Barbara, and William L. Montell. From Memory to History: Using Oral Sources in Local Historical Research. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1981.

Bartis, Peter T. Folklife and Fieldwork: A Layman's Introduction to Field Techniques. Washington, DC: American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, 1990.

Baum, Willa K. Oral History for the Local Historical Society. Nashville: American Association for State and Local History, 1987.

Jackson, Bruce. Fieldwork. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1987.

Taylor, David. Documenting Maritime Folklife: An Introductory Guide. Washington, DC: American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, 1993. (Also available through the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office S/N 030-000-00236-9).

Wolfman, Ira. Do People Grow on Trees? Genealogy for Kids and Other Beginners. New York: Workman Publishers, 1991.



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