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    Maya Your Days Be Merry

    Movies and Mayans visit New Haven this December.

    By Jennifer Dauphinais
    Published 12/19/02

    The Stuckists are throwing a holiday party on the evening of Winter Solstice (Dec. 21). I don't know if that was intentional, but I'll be there. I always celebrate Solstice, rather than the other big league chews that come rapt with guilt and tinsel. Adhering to their conceptual agenda to provide films to New Haven artgoers, the Stuckists will run "Stuck Films" at Saturday's event (at the Stuckism International Center, 817 Chapel St., New Haven, 675-2117). The premiere of the film noir "Blackout" from London is slated to run with two films from the late avant-garde filmmaker/music archivist Harry Smith starring Kid Congo Powers (of The Cramps) and Tom Jarmusch (from Living in Oblivion). A fitting apéritif to a gallery show featuring photography from Connecticut artists--not your traditional landscape and sailboat type photos, but within the Stuckist realm of stark, bold and surreal.

    Also celebrate solstice by visiting The Mayan Murals of Bonampak, on exhibit through the spring at Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History. The Mayans recognized their place in the universe as cyclical beings living inside of a big star-map full of cosmic energies. They paid tribute to Mother Earth through ritual, costume, and geomantic constructions. The culture of Bonampak marked the tail end of the great Mayan era, but also recorded the most detailed moments of Mayan lifestyles through detailed hieroglyphics. They are a fascinating people and can fill up more than one day at the museum.