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Philip K. Dick News

Researchers Use Lab Cultures
to Control Robotic Device
News by: Jason Koornick May, 2003

Shades of Maze of Death and Dr. Futurity...

The Hybrot, a small robot that moves about using the brain signals of a rat, is the first robotic device whose movements are controlled by a network of cultured neuron cells.

Steve Potter and his research team in the Laboratory for Neuroengineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology are studying the basics of learning, memory, and information processing using neural networks in vitro. Their goal is to create computing systems that perform more like the human brain.

"We call it the Hybrot because it is a hybrid of living and robotic components," he said. "We hope to learn how living neural networks may be applied to the artificial computing systems of tomorrow. We also hope that our findings may help cases in which learning, memory, and information processing go awry in humans."

  • Read the full story from the Georgia Institute of Technology

Scientific American: Parallel Universes Exist
News by: Jason Koornick May 11, 2003

"Not just a staple of science fiction, other universes are a direct implication of cosmological observations", Scientific American reports in it's May 2003 issue:

Is there a copy of you reading this article? A person who is not you but who lives on a planet called Earth, with misty mountains, fertile fields and sprawling cities, in a solar system with eight other planets? The life of this person has been identical to yours in every respect. But perhaps he or she now decides to put down this article without finishing it, while you read on.

The idea of such an alter ego seems strange and implausible, but it looks as if we will just have to live with it, because it is supported by astronomical observations.

Benetton clothing to carry
tiny tracking transmitters
News by: Jason Koornick March 12, 2003

NEW YORK (AP) -- Clothes sold at Benetton stores will soon contain microchip transmitters that allow the Italian retailer to track its garments from their point of manufacture to the moment they're sold in any of its 5,000 shops. Benetton's introduction of "smart tag" tracking technology will be the largest example of a trend now emerging in the retail industry, according to Phillips Semiconductors, a unit of the Dutch electronics giant that designed 15 million tags being delivered to Benetton this year.

Benetton's Sisley line of clothing will contain a Philips Electronics radio frequency ID tag that will replace ubiquitous bar codes, which have to be manually scanned. An RFID tag communicates its location to Benetton's computerized supply chain network, allowing the retailer to learn the status of its inventory at a glance and make restocking decisions quickly -- even automatically, said Terry Phipps, Benetton's electronic data processing director.

Researchers: It's easy to plant false memories
News by: Jason Koornick February 23, 2003

University of California-Irvine psychologist Elizabeth Loftus presented preliminary results of recent false memory experiments Sunday at the national meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The research demonstrates that police interrogators and people investigating sexual-abuse allegations must be careful not to plant suggestions into their subjects.

Loftus said some people may be so suggestible that they could be convinced they were responsible for crimes they didn't commit. In interviews, "much of what goes on -- unwittingly -- is contamination," she said.

  • Read the complete story on CNN.com

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PaulWilliams.com
Active from 1983 to 1992, during which time 30 issues of the Philip K. Dick Society Newsletter were published. Includes rare PKD Material, news, interviews, and more. Order back issues...

This book by Paul Williams includes letters, conversations and more with Philip K. Dick about his writing and his experiences.

Impermanent Press
The Dream Connection
An excellent anthology of PKD interviews, stories, essays and other primary and secondary material which will surprise and amaze even hard-cord PKD fans. Back in print after more than a dozen years!



The Vast Active Living Bibliographic System

The most complete bibliography of articles about Philip K. Dick, compiled by Andrew M. Butler and Umberto Rossi.