SANTOS DUMONT AND THE WRIGHT BROTHERS
 
SANTOS DUMONT, THE FIRST AVIATOR, AND THE WRIGHT BROTHERS – END OF THE CENTURY-OLD POLEMIC
 
 

In October 23, 1906 the Brazilian Alberto Santos Dumont made the first mechanical flight on a heavier-than-air machine: at 4 p.m. his airplane, the “14-bis”, rose from the ground and traveled the distance of 60 meters at a height of 2 to 3 meters: a small flight for a man but a great flight for humanity!

 
 
 
 
Santos Dumont flying in "14-bis" (Date: October 23, 1906)

 

At the grand banquet given on occasion by the Aero Club of France to the famous pioneer, Ernest Archdeacon pronounced the following words:

 

“Were I capable of the sin of envy, I should sin today in envy of my friend Santos Dumont, who has succeeded in winning glory as transcendent as any that man can aspire to in this world. He has just achieved, not in secret, not before hypothetical and unscrupulously biased witnesses, but in the clear light of day and before a crowd of people, a superb flight of 60 meters, at a distance of 3 meters from the ground, thus registering a decisive event in the history of aviation.”

 

On November 12, he set the first aviation record in the world, flying 220 meters in 21 ½ seconds with members of the Aero-Club du France in attendance. This won Santos Dumont a prize of 1500 francs for making the first flight over 100 meters. The flight was observed by officials from what would become the Federation Aeronautique Internationale (the designated keeper of aviation records), and was credited the first mechanical flight in the world.

 
 
 
Santos Dumont taking-off in “14-bis” - (November 12, 1906)

 

Here is the testimony of the Commission of the Aero Club regarding Santos Dumont’s flights made on November 12, 1906:

 

“First trial – Take-off at 10 a.m. The machine went up along the runway and in 5 seconds, at 40 centimeters above the ground, flew a distance of about 40 meters. The motor made 900 revolutions"
 
 

Second trial – Take-off at 10.25 a.m. The machine flew all over the training field, flying twice a little above the ground, the first time at 40 meters and the second one at about 60 meters. The run ended with a trial turn in full flight, same being cut short owing to the proximity of the trees, after having made a quarter turn to the right. The axle of the right supporting wheel, which had been slightly damaged during the landing, was replaced at lunch time.
 

During both trials the wind blew in gusts, the breezes suddenly coming up and just as suddenly dying away.
 

Third trial – Take-off at 4.09 p.m. Two flights: the first one for a distance of 50 meters; the second one being timed by Mr. Louscouf and Mr. Besançon, as follows: 82.60 m in 7s i.e., 11 47 m per second or 41.292 km per hour. Right turn trial stopped by the Polo barrier when the machine had already described nearly a half-turn.
 

During this trial Mr. Santos Dumont officially beat his own October 23 record, with which he held the Archdeacon Flying Cup. All the above mentioned flights were made in the same direction: the take-offs were from the Northern end of the Bagatelle lawn, the flights terminating at the Polo barrier.
 

The fourth trial was effected in exactly a contrary direction to the others. The airman started against the wind. The take-off was at 4.45 p.m. when the day was drawing to a close.
 

The machine, in a favoring breeze and still furthers aided by a slight list, sailed along almost all the time in fine fashion. It rushed though the air at full speed, surprising the spectators who did not get out of the way quick enough. In order to avoid crushing the people, Santos Dumont turned upwards, passing 6 meters over their heads. Did the gallant experimenter suffer an instant of hesitation? No. The machine stopped, but somewhat off its balance, turning to the right. Santos Dumont, who had kept his presence of mind in a marvelous manner, stopped the motor and descended. But the right wing was touched by the wheels which had come off and was slightly damaged. Fortunately Santos Dumont escaped untouched and is now the center of a wildly cheering crowd.”
 

 

All the newspapers of the world noticed the flight and many European newspapers published photographs of it. A cinematographic company filmed the scene.
 

In 1910, a monument was built on Bagatelle with the inscriptions:
 
 

 

“HERE, NOVEMBER 12 TH, 1906,
UNDER CONTROL OF AERO-CLUB DE FRANCE,
SANTOS DUMONT ESTABLISHED THE FIRST AVIATION
RECORD OF THE WORLD
DURATION: 21 SECS 1/5
DISTANCE 220 METERS"
 
 

 

 
Santos Dumont at Bagatelle (Date: 1924)

 

In 1913, a second monument, designed by the French sculptor Colin, was built by the Aero Club of France in Santos Dumont’s honor, at Saint-Cloud, with the following inscriptions:
 
 

“THIS MONUMENT

WAS BUILT
BY
AERO CLUB OF FRANCE
TO CELEBRATE THE EXPERIENCES
OF SANTOS DUMONT
PIONEER OF THE AERIAL LOCOMOTION”
 
 
 
 
Santos Dumont at Saint Cloud (Date: 1913)

 

The North Americans, however, credit the Wright brothers as the first to fly in an airplane in December 17, 1903 - three years before Santos Dumont -, and make a case for them, but the many sources they cite prove just the opposite.
 

For example: in 1956 the Chairman of the Civil Aeronautics, James R. Durffe, congratulated Brazil by “the Fiftieth Anniversary celebrating the first flight of the heavier than air machine which was designed, constructed and flown by Brazil great aviation pioneer, Alberto Santos Dumont.”

 
 
 

 

The message sent by the Chairman of the Civil Aeronautics, James R. Durffe, to the Minister of Aeronautics, Henrique Fleiuss

 
 
To defend and cherish Santos Dumont’s fame does not mean that anyone is being underrated. Our fellow countryman’s reputation was never acquired at the expense of that of anybody else. Everything that was accomplished before or after him remains unimpaired, and we are certainly among the first to recognize the high value of everything that has been done by all those who partake of the glory of having conquered the skies
 
 
BUT REALITIES CANNOT AND MUST NOT BE IGNORED, ESPECIALLY IN THE FIELD OF SPORT, WHEN CRONOLOGICAL FACTS ARE CONCERNED.
 
 
On the Wright Brothers' question with regard to man's first flight in an airplane, Santos Dumont wrote in his book, “What I saw, what we shall see”, published in 1918:
 

 

“I have no wish to detract from merits of the Wrights, from whom I have the greatest admiration; but it is undeniable that, only after all of us had flown, they made their appearance with a better machine than ours, saying that it was a copy of one they had built before we constructed our machines.
 

Immediately after the Wright Brothers, Levasseur came on the scene with the ‘Antoinette’, which was superior to everything else then existing; Levasseur had been working on the flight problem for 20 years, therefore he could have said that his machine was a copy of another built many years before. But he did not so.
 
 

What would Edison, Graham Bell or Marconi say if, after they had presented in public the electric lamp, the telephone or wireless telegraphy, some other inventor came on the scene with an electric lamp, telephone or wireless telegraph apparatus, saying that he had invented them before they did?
 

To whom does humanity owe aerial navigation in heavier-than-air-machines? To the Wright brothers’ experiments, made in secret (they are the first to say that they did everything possible so that nothing should transpire regarding the results of their experiments) and which were so unknown to the world that we see everybody calling my 220 meters flight ‘a memorable minute in the history of aviation’, or to Farman, Blériot or myself, we having made all of our demonstrations before scientific commissions and in road daylight?”
 
 
 

Later, in another book, called “The mechanical man”, - still not published - Santos Dumont wrote:

 

“I may now say” (he was writing this round about 1929) “that it was very painful indeed for me, after all my work on dirigibles and heavier-than-air-machines, to see the ingratitude of those who, a few years before, had praised me so highly.
 

I made my experiments in Paris, before the people and the press, who witnessed my achievements. The Aero Club of France honored me, as a pioneer of aeronautics, with the monument at Saint Cloud and the commemorative stone at Bagatelle, said acts of homage being officially confirmed by the Government of France bestowing on me the Legion of Honor ribbon, and I feel embarrassed at having to speak about myself – which I consider a very odious thing to do – in order to defend said evidence of my achievements and the honors conferred on me and which sometimes seem to have inconsiderately been forgotten.
 

This defense is more a proof of my gratitude than a vindication of rights. This last named claim, by the way, would be useless because history is only written on the rolling back of time and with facts and documents.
 

From 1901 to 1903 the whole world speaks of nothing else but my successful flights in dirigibles.
 

In 1906, my name is again praised to the skies, this time as the first man to fly in a heavier-than-air-machine… It is impossible to cite here all the newspapers which spoke about me in those terms, but what is certain is that all of them, without exception, were in perfect agreement regarding the matter.
 
 

A few years roll by, and all is forgotten.
 

The partisans of the Wright brothers claim that they flew in the United States from 1903 to 1905. Said flights said to have been made near Dayton, in a field along one of whose sides a street car used to pass.
 

I cannot fail to be profoundly surprised by the following inexplicably, unprecedented and hitherto unknown fact: during three and a half years the Wrights made innumerable mechanical flights and no journalist of the perspicacious press of the United States took the trouble to go and see the flights, watch the Wrights at work and take advantage of the opportunity to write up the most interesting interview of the time!
 

And what a great time it was!
 
 

Gordon Bennett was in the full tide of success. He was the prototype of the American journalist, the founder of interviewing on a large scale, and who had sent one of his men, Livingstone, to look for Stanley in the middle of Africa, then unknown and unexplored.
 

He encouraged everything new. Remember the Gordon Bennett Cup for free balloons and the one for automobiles.

Nearly every day and every night there was one of his reporters to be found in my workshop.

We are – he used to say to me – in a golden age of the history of the world and a prodigious interest is taken in your work.
 

And almost every day there were published reports on my activities in Gordon Bennett’s newspaper.
 

How then can one imagine that, at the same time, the Wright brothers were flying round in circles for several hours without anyone taking any notice of them?
 

It was only in 1908 that Wrights came to France and showed their machine for the first time. (…)
 

Now – and I request that careful note be taken of this – if the two brothers showed their machine at the end of 1908, it was because they had received an offer of 500.000 francs from a French contractor who asked them, in return, to give public demonstrations with the machine and to cede their patent rights to France.
 

And here is another point: at the Saint Louis World’s fair, in 1904, i.e., at the time when the Wrights’ machine, according to what they alleged, had been flying for a year, - and St. Louis is only a few miles from Dayton – there was a prize to be won, of the same value – 500,000 francs, as the offer they afterwards, in 1908, received from France. And on that occasion no cession of patent rights was demanded! But this prize did not interest the two brothers. They preferred to wait for four and a half years and travel 10.000 kilometers, to fulfill the conditions of the French offer, at very time when, I, Farman, Blériot and others, were already flying!”
 
 

Experiments by the Wright Brothers at Kitty Hawk and at Dayton were not a source of interest or curiosity in the neighborhood. Similarly, they did not caused any commotion to passersby, especially on a nearby road with heavy traffic; neither did they have any trusted witnesses. On a certain occasion the Wright Brothers invited newspaper reporters to see their experiments. Octave Chanute was one of them and, as an eyewitness, remarked that there was no takeoff. Since true witnesses of the alleged flights were lacking, supporters of the Wright brothers brought forth a supposed diary in which the two brothers themselves took notes of their achievements.
 
 

After Santos Dumont’s flights, the Wright brothers sent a letter to Captain Ferber with these words (the original letter, in French, was published for the first time in 1946, in the book of Robert Gastambide, " L´envol"):

 

“Dear Captain Ferber:
 
 
 

My brother and I learned through reading the correspondence from Paris published in the ‘New York Herald’, that the French public had highly appreciated a 220 meters flight in a straight line made by Mr. Santos Dumont in an airplane of his own construction. We would like very much to have exact reports of the experiments made at Bagatelle and hope that you will draw up for us a correct list of the trials and give us a description of the flying machine and a drawing of same. We had already seen by the picture in the New York Herald that the airplane rests on three wheels and we deduce from this that Mr. Santos Dumont, in order to effect his take-off, has first to make a run over a long level field. With the aid of the starting-off pillar that we use, Orville and I speedily go right up into the air in a much more practical fashion. Now, in view of the fact that the French consider a 220 meters flight in a straight line over the ground to be a ‘sensational performance’, we are sure to find a lot in our favor if we come to exhibit in France; but the voyage and the transportation of the machine and the pillar cost much more money than the two poor mechanics can afford to spend; also, dear Captain Ferber, if French experts, under your management, desire to come to Dayton, we will give them a demonstration of the machine in a neighboring field, flying for five minutes in a complete circle and let them have an option of the performance and release of the machine, for $50.000, cash down.
 

Yours truly,
 
 
 

Wilbur Wright.”
 
 

In 1908, the Wright brothers sent the following letter to Captain Ferber:

 

“Captain Ferber,
 

My brother Orville and I were very greatly moved on reading in the New York Heraldthat Mr. Henry Farman had publicly effected at the Issy-Plaine field a complete circle flight of 1 kilometer, and had been recompensed with the 100.000 francs offered by Mr. Deutsch, Mr. Archdeacon and others. We would be very pleased if you would send us a description of Mr. Henry Farman’s machine which, like Mr. Santos Dumont’s airplane, runs along the ground on wheels before going up into the air. We therefore believe that the French committee of experts should come immediately to Dayton to see how good the Wright machine is, owing to a patented wing spread device, it certainly makes a shorter turn about than Mr. Farman’s machine, which only has its rudder steering gear. You say in your last letter that the French experts only travel in the summer, but we think that is too long to wait and intend to divulge our machine, if your experts do not take up the matter without further delay.
 

However, as Orville and I need money, we now agree to receive for a flight of five minutes’ duration in a complete circle, only $25.000, cash down. Can you cable the reply?
 

Yours sincerely,
 
 

Wilbur Wright.”
 
 

What is the significance of the two letters transcribed? One sees, in first place, that the Wright brothers were not ignorant of the feats of Santos Dumont and the French, even showing, by their own testimony, the worldwide effect caused by the flights, which were given such importance that the Wrights wrote to Ferber asking for information about machines, which they had noted, by the pictures published in the American newspapers, were different from theirs, in an essential point: the manner of taking-off.
 

While they were trying to find out, imbued with boundless curiosity, what Santos Dumont’s and Farman’s machine and that of the Brazilian aeronaut – the Wrights did everything to keep their own flights from becoming know. If, regarding flights, publicly made and divulged throughout the world, they wrote to Ferber asking for information, what is one to say about the opinion of the French on their flights, made in secret?
 

The Wrights, in said letters, equally show their lack of knowledge and astonishment regarding the means used by Santos Dumont and the French to leave the ground. And what is more surprising, showing their ignorance regarding the French system, they say that ascension is more practical in their machines, i.e., starting off from a pillar weighing 700 kilos!
 

There is another point to be remembered here: knowing about the flights made in France (the first flight in an airplane, made by Santos Dumont and a complete circle flight, by Farman), the Wright did not utter a single word of protest, to guarantee, if not priority, then at least the possibility of an immediate trial, for them to vindicate their claim to the glory of the first human flight. Surprised at the news, they limited themselves to writing to Captain Ferber, asking for detailed information on the achievements of Santos Dumont and Farman.
 

In view of said letters, there can be no doubt about the following fact: the Wrights knew about the achievements of Santos Dumont and Farman, showing that they were aware of the importance that the French gave to their flights. Nevertheless, they kept silence. No protest was lodged at the Aero Club of France.
 

When one of the Wright brothers came to France, Santos Dumont was already flying in his “14-bis”, since 1906 and with his “N. 19” or “Demoiselle”, since 1907.
 

On June 6 1908, the magazine “L’Illustration” reproduced a photograph of one of the flights of the Wright brothers at that time, published in the New York edition of the “New York Herald”. Regarding the authenticity of said photograph the French magazine said: “This document is a proof on a photographic paper. But is it a photograph? The aspect is very doubtful and besides this, one notes in same all the characteristics of a trick.”
 

 

 

 

The first photograph published of the Wright’s powered airplane in flight (Date: May 14, 1908)

 
 
If the North-Americans inventors were for such a long time the cause of argument and their invention even denied in France, allow me to tell them that this is a little their own fault. Although they were treating of a business matter, they maintained a reserve incomprehensible to our nature, and which they only consented to break when their security began to be menaced by the performances of Santos-Dumont, Farman and Delagrange.
 
 
No one will deny the success of Wilbur Wright in the second half of 1908, almost two years after the celebrated Bagatelle flight. The Wright brothers then proved that they could fly, they did so publicly in said year, but this is very different from the claims that they had flown in 1903, 1904 and 1905.
 
 
Would not the fact that the Wrights flew, in France, in 1908, prove their previous flights? Evidently, no. The 1908 flights only constitute presumption of previous flights.
 
Said presumption of flights does not mean certainly, which should be the aim of any means of proof whatsoever. Presumption does not produce certainty, but only doubt, which will be greater or lesser according to circumstances, i.e., in accordance with the greater or lesser uncertainty of the facts on which it is based, the stronger or weaker connection between known and unknown facts.
 
 
Nevertheless, one must point out that, notwithstanding the fact that they made magnificent flights, better than any the French had made up to that time, even then, when Santos Dumont and the others were already making ascensions in heavier-than-air-machines, even in 1908, Wilbur Wright did not manage to realize a complete flight, as the airplanes of today do. His machines had not managed to carry out an important part of airplane flying: the taking-off. The Wright brothers machine was projected from a pillar and the impulse was given by a weight, connected to the airplane by a wire. On falling, the weight caused the airplane to leave the rails and project itself into space.
 

The 25th anniversary of the Kitty Hawk flight, which the Wright Brothers alleged that they made in 1903, was celebrated in the United States on December 1928, Orville Wright being present.
 

President Coolidge, in a speech made a few days before at the inauguration of the Washington Aeronautical Conference, made a reference to Santos Dumont, regarding his contribution to aeronautics, but gave to the Wrights the glory of having solved the problem of flight.
 

Brazil did not send a representative to said commemoration because it did not recognize, as it still does not do, the priority of the Wrights in flights with a heavier-than-air machine.
 

Here is the chronology of the records in Aeronautics published by the “National Aeronautics” of 1939:

 
 
 
 
 

The records in Aeronautics published by the “National Aeronautics” issue of December 1939

 
 
Santos Dumont appears in the first place and the Wright brothers only in 8th. (Note: the “National Aeronautics” is a magazine of the United States). Why? Very simply because, just as in all conquests and competitions, in all branches of activity – sport or science – the records are ratified by scientific commissions and the first flight verified in this way was that of our fellow Countryman.
 
 
The Wright brothers cited that five persons besides themselves were present in December, 17, 1903: these were Messrs. John T. Daniels, W. S. Dough, and A. D. Etheridge of the Kill Devil Life Saving Station; Mr. W. C. Brinkley of Manteo, and Mr. John Ward of Naghead. But another man watched the first takeoffs of the Wrights in December 17, 1903: Alpheus Drinkwater – the telegrapher who sent the message ushering their flights. The North Americans historians conveniently forget his declaration to “The New York Times” of December 17, 1951. Drinkwater declared that on that day – December 17, 1903 – the Wright brothers only “glided”, and their first real flight came on May 6, 1908.
 
 
 
 
 

 

The declaration of Mr. Drinkwater about Wright brothers’ flights published in “The New York Times” issue of December 17, 1951.

 

By the way, the Wright brothers never patented the airplane, only gliders. Note that there is no engine or propellers in the draws of the patent.
 
 

 
 
 
 

Draws of the Wrights’ English patent

 
 
The December 1953 issue of the “National Geographic Magazine” registered that in that year several organizations decided to build full-size reproductions of the original Wright plane. Two other groups planned powered copies, which would be flown by test pilots. Later these projects were abandoned. An industrial executive who headed one of the projects had 10 aeronautical engineers lined up for the job, and they could not make it fly.
 
 
 
 
 
 

The “National Geographic Magazine” issue of December 1953

 
 
Here is a comparison between the power and the mass of the “14-bis” and the “Flyer”:
 
 
 
Year
Pilot
Airplane
Engine
(power)
Mass
Velocity to take-off
Relation power/mass
1903
Wright
Flyer 1
12 hp
340 kg
50 km/h
1 cv to each 28,3 kg
1906
Dumont
14-bis
50 hp
290 kg
41 km/h
1 cv to each 5,8 kg
 
 
The relation power/mass of the Wright’s airplane is evident that the same could never fly.
 
TheNorth-American Ken Hyde, a expert builder of replicas of the first Wright Flyer, in an interview to “The News Observer” of December 15, 2002, declared:
 
 
 
“WE KNOW HOW TO PUT THE MAN ON THE MOON, BUT WE HAVE NOT BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN FLYING A TRUE WRIGHT AIRPLANE.”
 
 

Conclusion: Santos Dumont was indubitable the first man to fly in an airplane. The North Americans historians do not have any proof for promoting the Wright brothers as the first to fly.
 

When Santos Dumont decided to attack the problem of the mechanical flight, this conception was considered utopian by his contemporaries, and remained so until 1905. After Dumont’s flight, nobody doubted more of the possibility of the mechanical flight. French Captain Ferber in his book “Aviation” written in 1907, says: “The Brazilian inventor has proved that flying machines can fly,” which is equivalent to saying that until then nobody else had.

These are his own words, taken from pages 97 and 98 of his book:
 
 

“On October 23rd, before the Aviation Committee, at 4.45 p.m. the airplane rose from the ground, gently and without the slightest jolt. The crowd, astonished, had the impression that a miracle had been performed and at first were struck dumb with admiration; then they raised a shout of enthusiasm as the plane landed, and rushed forward to carry the aviator in triumph.”
 
 
 

And, a few lines further on:
 
 

“The record was raised to 220 meters a month later and the news flashed round the world at lightning speed. A new era opened from this date because the paralyzing spell had been broken. It had been proved that flying machines could fly.”

 

The airplane of the Wright brothers could not take off under its own power, even in 1908. Without a catapult to launch the airplane or sufficient headwinds, the Wright’s machine could not fly. Compare the flight of Santos-Dumont's Demoiselle with one of the Wright's European flights:

 
 
 

 
 
FACTS ABOUT THE WRIGHT BROTHERS
 
 

1 – THE WRIGHT BROTHERS HAD BEEN LIVING IN DAYTON, OHIO, BUT THEY FLEW IN KITTY HAWK, NORTH CAROLINA, A TOWN 500 MILES FAR FROM THEIR HOME.

2 – THERE WAS A PRIZE IN 1904, IN THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, TO THAT ONE WHO MADE THE FIRST FLIGHT IN AN AIRPLANE (100.000 DOLLARS). THE WRIGHT BROTHERS DIDN'T COMPETE.

3 – IN 1904, THE ENGLAND GRANTED TO THE WRIGHT BROTHERS A PATENT (NUMBER 6732) FOR THEIR INVENTION: A GLIDER.

4 – DURING THE YEAR OF 1907, WHEN CHARLES VOISIN AND OTHERS FRENCH PILOTS WERE ALREADY FLYING, THE WRIGHT BROTHERS VISITED PARIS AND STAYED IN MEURICE HOTEL, ROOM 516 FOR SEVERAL MONTHS.

5 – WILBUR WRIGHT MADE HIS FIRST PUBLIC FLIGHT IN LE MANS, ON AUGUST 8TH, 1908 WITH THE  “FLYER III”, EQUIPPED WITH A 30 HORSE POWER ENGINE.

6 – THERE IS NO MOVIE OF THE WRIGHT'S FLIGHTS BEFORE 1908.

7 – THE WRIGHT BROTHERS NEVER PATENTED THE AIRPLANE.

8 – THE TELEGRAPHER ALPHEUS DRINKWATER, WHO SENT THE MESSAGE USHERING THE WRIGHTS FLIGHTS, DECLARED TO "THE NEW YORK TIMES" OF DECEMBER 17, 1951, THAT ON THAT DAY – DECEMBER 17, 1903 – THE WRIGHT BROTHERS ONLY "GLIDED", AND THEIR FIRST REAL FLIGHT CAME ON MAY 6, 1908.

9 – THE DECEMBER 1953 ISSUE OF THE "NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE" REGISTERED THAT IN THAT YEAR SEVERAL ORGANIZATIONS DECIDED TO BUILD FULL-SIZE REPRODUCTIONS OF THE ORIGINAL WRIGHT PLANE. TWO OTHER GROUPS PLANNED POWERED COPIES, WHICH WOULD BE FLOWN BY TEST PILOTS. LATER THESE PROJECTS WERE ABANDONED. AN INDUSTRIAL EXECUTIVE WHO HEADED ONE OF THE PROJECTS HAD 10 AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERS LINED UP FOR THE JOB, AND THEY COULD NOT MAKE IT FLY.
 

QUESTIONS
 

1 – WHY DID THE WRIGHT BROTHERS TRAVEL 500 MILES ONLY TO FLY? WAS IT NOT TO HAVE THE HELP OF THE UP WIND COMING FROM THE DUNES?

2– A PRIZE OF 100.000 DOLLARS WAS OFFERED IN 1904 IN ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION (USA) TO WHO FLEW IN AN AIRPLANE. IF THE WRIGHT BROTHERS COULD FLY IN 1903, WHY THEY DID NOT TRIED TO WIN THE PRIZE?
 

3 –  IF THE WRIGHT BROTHERS REALLY COULD FLY IN AN AIRPLANE IN 1903, WHY THEY PATENTED A GLIDER IN 1904 IN ENGLAND? (NUMBER OF THE PATENT: 6732)
 
4 – WHEN IN PARIS, IN 1907, WHY DID THE WRIGHT BROTHERS NOT PRESENT THEMSELVES TO THE FRENCH AIRCLUB AND TO THE EUROPEAN PRESS?

5 – WHERE ARE THE PROOFS OF THE WRIGHTS FLIGHTS BEFORE 1908???
 
 

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