THE

HISTORY OF PORTLAND,

FROM 1632 TO 1864:
With a Notice of Previous Settlements Colonial Grants
AND.
CHANGES OF GOVERNMENT IN MAINE.

BY WILLIAM WILLIS.
SECOND EDITION-REVISED AND ENLARGED.
PORTLAND: BAILEY & NOYES  1865

Scanned, OCRed and HTML editing by David Blackwell 2001
for the Free NE Books Online Effort, NEHGS, the Maine Historical Society, and USIGS Library.


Short Table of Contents
Illustrations, Preface 1, Preface 2.
Introduction
1.
2.   1620 to 1658
3.   1640 to 1660
4.   Early Inhabitants
5.   First Court under Massachusetts rule
6.   Massachusetts rule restored
7.   First Indian War
8.   Purchase of Maine by Massachusetts
9.   Fort Loyal, Andros government
10. Population in 1689, Second Indian War
11. Second Settlement
12. Third Indian War
13. New Settlers
14. Education
15. Church Affairs
16. War of 1744
17. Population.
18. Pre - Revolution
19. Revolutionary War
20. Revival of the town
21. Division of the town
22. Courts. 608
23. Churchs. 639
24. Separation of Maine from Massachusetts.702
25. Miscellanies. 724
26. Biographical Notices. 787
Appendex
Index.
 
Introduction
Chapters : 
1, 2 , 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.,
11.,12.,13.,14.,15.,16.,17.,18.,19.,
20.,21.,22.,23.,24.,25.,26.
Appendex,  Index.


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CONTENTS.                                                     PAGE.

INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER. page 9
A BRIEF account of the settlements on the coast of Maine, previous to 1632.

CHAPTER I. page 35
RICHMOND'S island-Spurwink-dispute between Cleeves and Tucker, and John Winter. about the titletrade at Richmond's island - the Neck, now Portland, first occupied - grants in other parts of Falmouth Mitton, Macworth - first Judicial Court for the Provincesettlers in Falmouth in 1640.

CHAPTER II. page 62
THE political affairs of the Province from the great patent in 1620, to the submission to the jurisdiction of Massachusetts in 1658 - Sir Ferdinando Gorges.

CHAPTER III. page 95
BOUNDARIES and name of the town -
inhabitants in 1658, and places of residence -
early conveyances first mills -
settlers at Back cove -
Jordan's claim and quarrel with Cleeves -
Fac-simile autograph signatures of early settlers.

CHAPTER IV. page 126
INHABITANTS Petition the General Court against the claims of Cleeves and Jordan - petition of the freemen to the General Court - islands belonging to Falmouth - new settlers, Munjoy, Wakely, Coe, Brackett, Clarke, Felt, Cloice, and others - Mitton's death.

CHAPTER V. page 142
FIRST Court under Massachusetts-state of religion in the town-deputies-courts-pay of jurymenhighways-prison-Abraham Preble-opposition to Massachusetts-Ring's commissioners suspend the authority of that colony-memorial from Casco-return of the commissioners.

CHAPTER VI. page 168
PROCEEDINGS of the new government - courts in Casco, persons presented, state of morals
Cleeve, death and character - Thomas Skilling's death and family-government of Mas
sachusetts restored -Jordan, Jocelyn, Neale -freemen petition General Court-Munjoy
licensed to retail--eastern line run-selectmen-Falmouth presented-settlements at
Capisic, Stroudwater, and Purpooduck - death of Martin, Wharff, Bartlett, and Mills.

VI                                                                       CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.  page 194
THE first Indian war-inhabitants of Falmouth 1615-destruction of the town in 1676 - further attacks of the Indians-militia in 1675-peace-prisoners restored-Walter Gendall-Robert Jordan's death-Brackettnames of inhabitants in Casco bay.

CHAPTER VIII.  page 222
PURCHASE of Maine by Massachusetts-goverulnent-re-settlement of Falmouth-Danforth's grants, and other titles on the Neck-grants by the town-Silvanus Davis-Munjoy's death and family-first tavern, Seacomb, Jones, Cloice-death of Mrs.Harvey and George Lewis-George Burroughs.

CHAPTER IX. page 249
FORT Loyal-saw-mills taxed for its support-deed of Falmouth to trustees-government of Andros, new patents for land required-French emigrants-roads and ferries-business of the town and its internal condition-quarrel between Lawrence and Davis.

CHAPTER X. page 269
POPULATION in 1689-commencement of the second Indian war-Andros visits Maine- his authonty subverted - renewal of hostilities - attack on Falmouth resisted - second attack and destruction of the town.

CHAPTER XI.  page 289
A BRIEF notice of some of the inhabitants of Falmouth during the second settlementnames of the settlers.

CHAPTER XII.  page 309
REVIVAL of the town at Purpooduck and New Casco - Indian treaty of 1703 violated - commencement of third Indian war - settlements at Purpooduck and New Casco destroyed New Casco fort abandoned - peace - the Neck settled - re-settlement of the town-Falmonth incorporated - Irish emigrants - municipal government - old and new proprietors - distribution of land on the Neck - accession to the population controversy between old and new proprietors.

CHAPTER XIII.  page 338
CHARACTER of the first settlers - Samuel Moody- Benjamin Larrabee - Samuel Cobb - Samuel Proctor - ferry and traveling - Indian war of 1722 - Father Ralle - peace - accessions to the population, Riggs, Sawyer, Westbrook, and others - ecclesiastical affairs - meeting. house built - Mr. Smith settled.

CHAPTER XIV.  page 365
EDUCATION - schools and school - masters-educated men - public library.

CHAPTER XV.  page 382
ECCLESIASTICAL affairs - Purpooduck parish set off - Presbyterians - Purpooduck parish - First parish, new meeting - house - revival - George Whitefield - New Casco parish -Episcopal society - settlement of Mr. Deans - Quakers.

CONTENTS.                                                                           VII

CHAPTER XVI. page 411
WAR of 1744 -- causes of war-preparations for defense - commencement of hostilitiesalarms from Indians and French - volunteers -- captureof Louisburg - treaty of Falmouth - unsettled state of the country - war of 1754 -- capture of Quebec - peace.

CHAPTER XVII.  page 438
POPULATION at different periods before the revolution - taxes - currency - lumber and sawmills gristmills - trade and commerce - customs and collection - wharves - general description of the Neck prior to the revolution - streets.

CHAPTER XVIII.  page 479
REVOLUTION - causes of excitement - stamp act, its repeal - sugar act-new duties laidmilitary force employed -- colliaion with the troops - repeal of duties - non-importation agreements-duties on molasses and tea-tea duty enforced and tea destroyed-proceedings in Falmouth - Boston port - bill convention in Falmouth - preparations for war.

CHAPTER XIX.  page 506
REVOLUTIONARY war - proceedings in Falmouth - Mowatt taken prisoner-proceedings against toriestroops raised-denunciation of Gov. Hutchinson - arrival of Mowatt and destruction of the townapplications for relief-measures of defense - privateering - aserifices of the people - capture of Bagaduce - expedition to the Penobscot - capture of General Wadsworth - surrender of Cornwallis civil affairs of the revolution - constitution prepared and adopted for the State - acts against monopolies - close of the war, the fisheries, peace.

CHAPTER XX.  page 549
REVIVAL of the town - buildings erected - number of dwelling - houses and population-commercestores and trade -wharves - light-house - harbor - banks - commercial embarrassments.

CHAPTER XXI.  page 579
DIVISION of the town-its size and population -post-office and mails - stages and traveling - railroads - Commercial street - newspapers - adoption of the constitution - representatives to Congress - French mania - politics of the town in 1793 - republican societyharbor defenses.

CHAPTER XXII.  page 608

COURTS --court-houses and jails-inferior courts - superior courts - law and lawyers - capital trials - decrease of crime.

CHAPTER- XXIII.  page 639

ECCLESIASTICAL affairs after the revolution - Episcopal society-
First Parish - Second Parish in Portland -
death of Mr. Smith, Mr. Nichols ordained, death of Dr. Deane -
Second Parish, Mr. Payson ordained, his death and successors-
Third Congregational society-.
Chapel society -Third Parish -High street church -
Methodist society-Baptists-
Christian - Universalists-Swedenborgians-
Roman catholics-Mariners' church.

CHAPTER XXIV.  page 702
SEPARATION of Maine from Massachusetts.

VIII                                                                                CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXV.  page 724
MISCELLANIES-Cumberland and Oxford canal-bridges-promenades - sugar-house - steamships - Board of trade - manufactures - academy and schools - library - Atheneum authors - charitable societies cemeteries - epidemics - change of government to a city taxes - deaths and marriages - immigrants population and character of the inhabitants - customs of the people at different periods-amusements theatre - conclusion.

CHAPTER XXVI.  page 787
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES.



APPENDIX.

No. I.  page 865
RECORD of an action in 1640, Cleeves v. Winter, for disturbing his possession at Spurwink, with the pleadings and verdict.

No. I I .  page 867
PETITION of Robert Jordan in 1618 to the court of Ligonia, for leave to appropriate Trelawny's property in his hands to the payment of Winter's claim against Trelawny's estate; proceedings of the court thereon, and an inventory of the property. Also a statement of the account.

No. III.  page 873
ACTION in 1610, Cleeves v. Winter, for disturbing his possession on the Neck, with the pleadings.

No. IV.  page 875
LEASE for two thousand years from Sir Ferdinando Gorges to Cleeves and Tucker of part of Falmouth, dated January 27th, 1637--letters of Thomas Gorges, Sir Ferdinando Gorges, Richard Vines, Rev. Thomas Jenner, Edmund Godfrey, and George Cleeves, to Governor Winthrop and other.

No. V.  page 882
EXTRACT from John Jocelyn's voyages, showing the situation of the several towns in the province about 1670.

No. VI.  page 884
ROBERT Jordan's will, 1679.

No. VII.  page 885
INDIAN deed to George Munjoy of land at Ammoncongin, June .1,1666.

No. VIII.  page 886
THOMAS Danforth's deed to the trustees of Falmouth, 1684.

No. IX.  page 887
LETTERS to George Bramhall 1687 and 1688, and receipts from him and Silvanus Davis.

CONTENTS.                                                                                  IX

No: X.  page 889
PETITIONS Of the propritors and settlers of Falmouth to the General Court in 1717 and 1718 for incorporation.

No. XI.  page 890
PERSONS admitted inhabitants by the town principally in 1727 and 1728.

No. X I I .  page 892
PETITIONS to the General Court in 1728 by the ancient proprietors.

No. XIII.  page 893
REPORT of a committee of the town, and resolves adopted in February, 1774, on the rights of the colonies.

No. XIV.  page 894
PROCEEDINGS of the convention of delegates from the towns in Cumberland county, September 21, 1774, at Falmouth.

No. XV.  page 895
PROCEEDINGS of the Committee of correspondence and inspection in Falmouth.

No. XVI.  page 897
MUSTER roll of Captain David Bradish's company, May, 1774.

No. XVII.  page 897
Houses now standing which survived the conflagration of 1774
Dr. Deane's letter On the subject of an engraving of the town as it appeared at the time of the fire.

No. XVIII.  page 900
AN account of the losses sustained by the destruction of the town.

No. XIX.  page 902
PROCEEDINGS of the inhabitants to obtain relief from Europe-
No. 1. Mr. Titcomb's letter to Samuel Freeman
No. 2. Gov. Bowdoin's letter to Enoch Freeman
No. 3. Gov. Bowdoin's letter to Gov. Pownal
No. 4. Gov. Pownal's letter to Enoch Freeman and others
No. 5. Address to the people of Ireland.

No. XX.  page 905
GRANT of two townships of land to the sufferers in the destruction of the town.

No. XXI.  page 906
THE amount of tonnage registered and enrolled in the custom-house at Portland. with the amount of duties, exports, imports, etc.

No. XXII.  page 908
PETITION for a division of the town of Falmouth is 1785.


ILLUSTRATIONS.
FTS   I.   PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF PORTLAND IN 1864, FROM CAPE ELIZABETH.
 94    II. A PLAN OF ANCIENT FALMOUTH,
                       EMBRACING THE TRACT FROM SPURWINK RIVER TO NORTH YARMOUTH,
                       WITH THE LOCATION OF THE ORIGINAL SETTLERS. page 94.
308 III.  PORTRAIT OF THE AUTHOR. page 308.
520 IV.  FALMOUTH NECK AT THE TIME OF ITS DESTRUCTION
                       BY MOWATT IN 1775. page 520.
768  V.  A VIEW OF MIDDLE STREET AS IT WAS IN 1811,
                      LOOKING EAST FROM TEMPLE STREET,
                     SHOWING THE FRONT OF THE OLD EXCHANGE,
                     THE SECOND PARISH MEETING HOUSE, AND OTHER BUILDINGS. page 768.
770   VI. A VIEW OF THE SAME PART OF MIDDLE STREET IN 1863. page 770.
772  VII. A VIEW OF MIDDLE STREET IN 1863,
                     LOOKING WEST FROM TEMPLE STREET. page 772.
 
 


FAC-SIMILES OF AUTOGRAPH SIGNATURES

THOMAS ELBRIDGE AND ABRAHAM SHURT. . 21
WALTER NEALE. 37
JOHN WINTER. 41
GEORGE CLEEVES, GEORGE MUNJOY, RICHARD MARTIN, RALPH TURNER, AND GEORGE LEWIS. 109, 110
RICHARD TUCKER, EDWARD RISHWORTH, AND ROBERT HOWARD. 111
REV. ROBERT JORDAN. . 126,217
HENRY JOCELYN . . 183
SIR EMUND ANDROS AND JOHN WEST. 269
ANTHONY BRACKETT AND SILVANUS DAVIS. . 268 .
PETER BOWDOIN, JOHN HOLMAN, AND GEORGE BRAMHALL. .. 291
THOMAS WESTBROOK AND SAMUEL WALDO . . 355
THOMAS GORGES. . . 880
SIR FERDINANDO GORGES. 880
RICHARD VINES. 880
REV. THOMAS JENNER. . 880
EDMUND GODFREY. 880
GEORGE CLEEVE. 880


PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

A third of a century has elapsed since the publication of the first edition of the History of Portland. That having long since been exbausted, I have yielded to repeated applications, and, with much labor and without pecuniary profit, have prepared a new edition of the work. I have taken the occasion to correct such errors as have been discovered in the first impression - to throw light received from subsequent investigations into our early annals upon transactions which seemed obscure, and to bring the history of our progressive community down to the present day. I have added several biographical notices, and made others more full in genealogical facts; and to the whole have appended a copious index.

During the third of a century which has intervened since the first publication, the population of the town has considerably more than doubled; its commerce, and its various industrial, religious, social, and literary institutions have multiplied in far larger proportion, and almost an entirely new community has taken the place of the living generation which I then addressed. This accumulation of facts, while it has necessarily extended the work, has given additional value to its pages.

In 1820, when Maine became an independent State, no historical work, nor any other of literary value had been published in the State. Gov. Sullivan's History of Maine was published in Boston in 1795; although a native of Maine, he then resided in that city. Historical sketches of several towns had appeared in the Mass. Historical Collections; and Moses Greenleaf in 1816, had issued from the press in Boston, and Joseph Whipple the same year from the press in Bangor, Geographical and Statistical pamphlets, one of one hundred and fiftyfour, and the other of one hundred and two pages, having reference more particularly to the question of separation then agitating the minds of the people. The first work on a

XII                                                                     PREFACE.

historical subject published after the separation, was Greenleaf's Ecclesiastical Sketches in 1821 ; and the same year Judge Freeman issued his extracts from the journals of the Rev. Thomas Smith, with statistics of the town and county, both in duodecimo form. These were followed in 1827 by Mr. White's History of Belfast, one hundred and twenty pages, Moses Greenleaf 's map of Maine, with an octavo volume of valuable statistics in 1829, and by Mr. Folsom's History of Saco and Biddeford in 1830. In 1831, the first volume of the Maine Historical Collections was published, which contained the first part of my History of Portland, and in 1832, appeared my second part in a separate form, bringing the history of the town to that period. The same year Mr. Williamson published his elaborate History of Maine in two octavo volumes, which has been followed by five volumes of the Transactions of the Maine Historical Society, and numerous and very valuable histories of towns and communities in our State, and in 1863 the Popham Memorial Volume, a compilation of rare value, which several works have ably and clearly illustrated our early and later annals.

Location and Meteorological Statistics of Portland. The New City Hall, near the center of Portland, is in north latitude 43�, 39', 27". West longitude from Greenwich 70�, 15', 40". Longitude in time from Greenwich four hours, fortyone minutes, and three seconds. It is five hundred and sixty miles from Washington, three hundred and thirty from New York, one hundred and five from Boston, two hundred and ninety-four by the Grand Trunk Railway to Montreal, two hundred and seventeen to Quebec, five hundred and fifty-seven to Toronto. and eight hundred and fifty-nine to Detroit. The magnetic variation in January, 1863, was twelve four-tenths, having increased from eight degrees in 1765.

By tables kept at the Observatory, on Munjoy's Hill in Portland, one hundred and sixty feet above the level of high water, for thirty-two years from 1825 to 1857 inclusive, it appears that the annual average temperature for that period was 43�, 231, of Farenheit. The highest point it attained was 100�, 5' ; the lowest was January 24, 1857, 25� below zero. The highest mean temperature in any month of that period was 71� in July, 1825 ; the lowest mean temperature for any month was 13� above zero in January, 1844. The average temperature of the seasons for the thirty-two years was as follows: March, April, May, 39�, 98'; June, July, August, 63�, 71' ; September, October, November, 46�, 7 3' ;

PREFACE.                                                       XIII

December, January, February, 21�, 93'. The mean temperature for 1856 was 44�, 13'; for 1857, 44�, 68'; for 1858, 44�, 4' ; for 1859, 43�, 47'.

The amount of rain, and snow reduced to water, in 1857, was 47.66 inches; in 1858, 43.42 inches; in 1859, 48.55 inches.

The prevailing winds may be set down in the following proportions of 100. North and east 25, east and south 14, south and west 25, west and north 36 100.

Mean barometric pressure at a station eighty-five and a half feet above the sea, 29.9.

The sewerage and sanitary condition of Portland are of a high order; and nothing in this respect is especially needed, but a supply of pure water: For this purpose, there are ample sources of an excellent character within eighteen miles of the city. I need only refer to the Sebago Lake, a sheet of very pure water, containing about sixty-five thousand square acres, and of great depth, which is fed by other lakes and several streams of water.


FALMOUTH originally contained within its limits the present towns of FALMOUTH, CAPE ELIZABETH, PORTLAND, and WESTBROOK; and embraced a number of large and valuable islands lying in Casco BAY. It is proposed in the introductory chapter of the following work, to present a cursory view of the settlements made, and attempted to be made, on the coast of Maine, previous to that of Falmouth. After which my attention will be principally confined to that town, until PORTLAND was separately incorporated; this latter town will then receive more exclusive notice.

The various changes in the government of the country, especially during the early period of its history, will be briefly alluded to, as they had an immediate influence upon the happiness and prosperity of the inhabitants.

The entire loss of the records in the destruction of the town by the Indians in 1690, has deprived me of many valuable materials for the present work, and rendered my task at the same time more difficult and more unsatisfactory. But this consolation has accompanied me, that whatever facts I could glean from the State and county records, and other scattered sources of information, become more valuable and more interesting, by the unfortunate events which have destroyed the more ready and minute aids to historical accuracy.

It is known to most readers, that previous to 1752, the year commenced on the 25th day of March; consequently the time between the first day of January and that day, was reckoned with the former year, and it was usually expressed by a double date; an instrument for instance, bearing date January 15, 1640, according to our calendar, would be expressed January 15, 1639-40. Sometimes only 1639. In such cases I have invariably adapted the date to the present mode of computation, so far as regards the year. The day of the month by the new style, may be ascertained by omiting ten days in the seventeenth century, eleven in the eighteenth, and twelve in the nineteenth. The alteration was made in England by a statute passed in 1751, to take effect January 1, 1752. and which authorized the omission of the eleven intermediate days of the calendar, from the 2d to the 14th day of September of that year.


ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRESS IN THE YEAR 1865, BY
BAILEY & NOYES,
IN THE CLERK'S OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF MAINE.

PRESS OF BROWN THURSTON;
82 Exchangee Street.



Scanned, OCRed and HTML editing by David Blackwell 2001
for the Free NE Books Online Effort, NEHGS, the Maine Historical Society, and USIGS Library.