HOME

SEARCH

Most recent NEWS

Colombia

Armed Actors
Colombia-
Ecuador issues

Glyphosate &
its fomulations

Ecuadorian gov't studies
Ecuadorian NGO studies
Other Countries
USG studies
USG positions
USG-Colombian
gov't studies
FOIA
Scientific
Commercial
Court cases 
Glyphosate
& Fusarium
FOTOS:
Sanho Tree's
Herbicide damage to foodcrops in Colombia
Fumigation from the air
More crop damage
Alternative Development
Chronology
Southern Colombia Map
Books
Background docs

Site History

LINKS:

Acción Ecológica

AIDA
Amazon
A
lliance
CHRN
DPAlliance
DRCNet
EarthJustice

Mama Coca

IPS

LAWG

Narco News

TIDES

WOLA

Contact us:
Webalizer

 

 


Dr. Elsa Nivia
Colombia Regional Coordinator, Pesticide Action Network, Cali, Colombia

See Elsa Nivia's latest book/Veáse su último libro: Mujeres y Plaguicidas

Effects on health and environment of glyphosate-containing herbicides

Elsa Nivia

Introduction

Glyphosate is a systemic herbicide acting in a post- emergence, non-selective, broad-spectrum manner, and is used to kill undesirable plants such as annual and perennial grasses, broad -leaved plants and woody species. Glyphosate, N(-phosphonomethyl) glycine is an acid, but it is commonly applied as a salt, most often the isopropylamine salt. Its most common commercial name is Round-up. In Colombia, apart from its use as an herbicide in agriculture, it is used as a grain dessicant and as a ripening agent by aerial application and in illicit crop eradication programs - the subject of this presentation. As a crop eradication agent, glyphosate will also eradicate foodcrops and forest species, and the true impacts of its use on health and the environment have not yet been adequately studied.

The worldwide sales of glyphosate, whose main producer is Monsanto, are presently over $1,500 million annually, this is calculated to increase to $2,000 million over the next five years, equivalent to more than 40,000 the tons of the active ingredient (Dinham, 1998). At present, sales of this herbicide makeup about 40 percent of Monsanto’s agrochemical market worldwide (worldwide sales total $4,3032 million in 1998, 23.2% more than in 1997). In 1998, Monsanto held second place in the sale of agrochemicals after Novartis and first-place in the production and sale of transgenic seeds, genetically modified so that crops that are resistant to glyphosate -increasing the sales of this agrotoxin (Dinham, 1999).

Between 1986 and 1996 the use of glyphosate tripled in the US. In Europe its use increased 129% between 1991 and 1995 due to the declarations by Monsanto that the herbicide is not harmful to human beings and is environmentally safe. But, according to Cox (1995) and Dinham (1998), there are data from independent scientific investigations about glyphosate-containing herbicides, that contradict Monsanto’s statements and give a very different view of their health and environmental risks.

Before being marketed, herbicides pass through a formulation process, during which the active ingredients are mixed with other substances such as solvents, adjuvants etc, known as "inert ingredients," which are not described on the labels. In many cases, "inert ingredients" are active biologically, chemically, or are toxic, and can produce different characteristics when found in the commercial formulations, than in any of the components alone. This means that if one doesn’t make careful toxicological studies of the commercial herbicides, as used in the real world, it becomes impossible to evaluate their risks to the environment and human health.

The majority of the products that contain glyphosate are made or are used with a surfactant to aid glyphosate’s penetration into the tissues of the plant, which bestows different toxicological characteristics to the commercial formulations in comparison to glyphosate alone. In the case of Roundup, the herbicidal formulation most used, it contains a surfactant called polyoxyethylamine (POEA), organic acids related to glyphosate, isopropylamine, and water. In the present study we will make examine to the characteristics of glyphosate, but separately the scientific studies made with Round-up.

Commercial Names

In Colombia, Monsanto has registered glyphosate (ICA 1998) under the commercial names Roundup, Rocket, Rocky, Faena, Patrol, Squadron, Ranger and Fuete. Other agrochemical businesses alsohave registered commercial formulations based on the same active ingredient, under the names of: Batalla (Bayer); Glyfoagri (Disagri); Socar (Agrevo); Crossout, Candela y Glyfosan (Agroser); Glifonox (Crystal); Glifosol (Coljap); Stelar (Dow); Panzer (Invequímica); Glyphogan (Magan); Faena (Proficol); Regio (Quimor); Sunup (Sundat); Glifosato Agrogen (Agroquímicos del Cauca) y Tunda (Fertilizantes Cafeteros).

Mode of Action

The herbicidal action of glyphosate is probably due to the inhibition of the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan), used for the synthesis of proteins essential for the growth and survival of most plants. Glyphosate inhibits the enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, important for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids; and it may also inhibit or repress the activity of other enzymes, chlorismate mutase and prephrenate hydratase, both involved in other steps of the synthesis of those same aminoacids. All of these enzymes are part of the shikimic acid pathway, present in higher plants and microorganisms but not in animals.

Glyphosate can affect enzymes not connected with the shikimic acid pathway. In sugar cane, it lowers the activity of one of the enzymes involved in sugar metabolism, acid invertase. This reduction appears to be mediated by auxins (plant hormones).

Glyphosate also affects animal and human enzyme systems. In rats, injection into the abdomen decreases the activity of two detoxification enzymes, cytochrome P-450 and a monooxygenase, and decreases the intestinal activity of the enzyme aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (Cox 1995).

New More Toxic Formulations of Glyphosate

Research: According to greenhouse investigations in Maryland, USA and field investigations between 1995 and 1997 in Hawaii, with the addition of two surfactants, AL-77 and Optima to the glyphosate in the Rodeo formulation, the toxicity of glyphosate against coca was increased by a factor of four, compared to the commercial Roundup formula (Collins & Helling). According to this study, the herbicide mixture presently used in Colombia for coca eradication has been "modified", with excellent results.

This supposed change of formulation coincides with complaints from the affected communities, who claim that more damage is being done to grasses and food crops, and that the symptoms of the resultant intoxication are more serious. We do not know exactly what formulation is being used. The two new surfactants are made up of the following:

A77: 1:1 mixture (by volume) of Agridex and Silwet L-77.

Agri-Dex: a mixture of heavy-range paraffin-based petroleum oil.

Silwet L-77: polyalkeleneoxide-modified heptamethyltrisiloxane.

Optima: mixture of polyethoxylated alkylamines, alkyl polyexylene glycols, and organic acids.

Health Effects

Herbicides that contain glyphosate such as Roundup are registered in Colombia in Toxicity Class IV, slightly toxic, based on the oral LD50 2 of its active ingredient, considered to be more than 5,000 mg/kg (earlier it was thought to be 4,320 mg/kg and within Toxicity Class II). But in the United States these herbicides have been reclassified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as Class II, highly toxic, because of eye irritation 3 (Meister 1995). The EPA has classified it as "medium" irritant, but the World Health Organization has found more serious effects; in several studies using rabbits it was characterized as "strongly" irritating or "extremely" irritating (Cox 1995). The active ingredient, Glyphosate on its own, is classified in Category I, extremely toxic.

Both glyphosate alone as well as the products that contain it are more toxic through dermal application and inhalation than by oral ingestion, the most common routes of occupational exposure. In several tests, the inhalation of Roundup in rats caused signs of intoxication in all of the groups studied and even in the lowest doses applied. Symptoms included a dark nasal secretion, panting, congested eyes, reduced activity, hair standing on end, loss of body weight, and blood-congested lungs.

Roundup is one of the most common of the herbicides that cause human poisoning incidents. It the majority of these have involved eye and skin irritation in workers, after exposure during mixing, transporting, or application. Nausea and periods of dizziness have also been reported after exposure as well as respiratory problems, increased in blood pressure, and allergic reactions.

Cases of accidental poisoning or intentional ingestion as well as occupational exposure of Roundup studied by Japanese doctors and the following symptoms of acute poisoning were reported: gastrointestinal pain, massive loss of gastrointestinal liquid, vomiting, excessive fluid in the lungs, congestion and lung dysfunction, pneumonia, loss of consciousness, destruction of red blood cells, abnormal electrocardiograms, low blood pressure, and damaged or reduced hepatic function.

Many of these symptoms are presently being experienced by Yanacona Indians living in the Colombian Macizo of the Cauca Department, Colombia, especially by children, who have received indiscriminate fumigations over houses and schools, and by people working in their food-crop plots (additionally, this fumigation is also destroying the forage on which the animals depend, and potato, corn, onion, ulluco potatoes, coriander and other crops, upon which these communities survive).

The surfactant in Roundup is considered to be the principal cause of the toxicity of this formulation. POEA has an acute toxicity of three times greater than that of Glyphosate, and causes gastrointestinal and central nervous system damage, respiratory problems, and the distraction of red blood cells in humans. Furthermore it is contaminated with 1-4 dioxane, which has caused cancer in animals and damage to the liver and kidneys in humans.

The EPA has found that exposures to residues of Glyphosate in water for human consumption above the maximum authorized limit of 0.7 mg/l can cause rapid respiration and lung congestion.

Chronic Toxicity: Glyphosate has also been found to be toxic in long-term studies in animals. With high doses in rats (900-1200 mg/kg of body weight per day) decreased body weight in females was reported; an increased incidence of cataracts and lens degeneration in males; and increased liver weight in males. At lower doses (400 mg/kg of body weight per day) inflammation of the stomach's mucous membrane occurred in both sexes.

At high doses (about 4800 mg/kg of body weight per day) in rats, males experienced decreased body weight, excessive growth of particular liver cells, death of the same liver cells, and chronic inflammation of the kidney. In females, excessive growth of some kidney cells occurred. At a lower dose (814 mg/kg of body weight per day) excessive cell division in the urinary bladder occurred.

According to the EPA, continual exposure to residues in water in concentrations above 0>7 mg/L can cause liver damage.

Reproductive Effects: In rat and rabbit feeding studies, Glyphosate affected semen quality and sperm counts (Cox 1995, Dinham 1998). According to the EPA, continual exposure to residue in water in concentrations higher than 0.7 mg/L can cause reproductive problems in humans.

Carcinogenicity: The EPA initially classified Glyphosate as a "Group D Toxin": "not classifiable as a human carcinogen". Later, in the beginning of the 1990's, they placed it in "Group C": -"possible human carcinogen". At present, it is classified as a "Group E Toxin": "No evidence of carcinogenicity in humans." When this classification was made, it was added that it was based on the available evidence at that time and should not be interpreted as a definitive conclusion that the product is not a carcinogen in every circumstance. This statement is probably due to the fact that the potential for Glyphosate to cause cancer has been the subject of a continuing controversy since the beginning of the studies during the early 1980's.

The first study (1979-1981) showed an increase in testicular interstitial tumors in male rats at the highest dose tested (30 mg/kg of body weight per day), as well as an increase in the frequency of a thyroid cancer in females. The second study (completed in 1983) found dose-related increases in the frequency of a rare kidney tumor. Another study (1988-1990) showed an increase in the number of pancreas and liver tumors in male rats together with an increase of the same thyroid cancer found in an earlier study in females. None of these increases in tumor incidence were not considered compound-related by the EPA; or they did not have statistical significance, that it was not possible to consistently distinguish between thyroid tumors and cancer, and that there was no relationship with dose, or that there was no disease progression.

Concerns regarding the potential carcinogenicity of glyphosate persist, because of the contaminant N-nitroso-glyphosate (NNG) at 0.1 ppm or less, or this compound can be formed in the environment by simple reaction with Nitrate (present in human saliva or fertilizers), and it is known that the majority of N-nitroso compounds are carcinogenic. And there is no safe dose for carcinogens. Additionally, in the case of Roundup, the surfactant POEA is contaminated with 1-4 dioxane, which has caused cancer in animals, and liver and kidney damage in humans. Formaldehyde, another known carcinogen, is also a breakdown compound of Glyphosate.

Mutagenicity:

Environmental effects

Drift: Sublethal doses of glyphosate carried by the wind (drift) harm wild flowers and may affect some species more than 20 meters from the site sprayed. Drift is inevitable when applying pesticides, and will depend on several circumstances, including method of application (ground or aerial) and wind velocity. The distances measured for the different methods of application are as follows:

Ground applications: from 14% to 78% of the glyphosate applied leaves the site. Sensitive species died at 40 meters. The models indicate that susceptible species may die at 100 meters. Residues have been found 400 meters from the site of ground application.

Helicopter applications: From 41% to 82% of the glyphosate applied by helicopter moved out of the site.

Applications by plane: Aerial application by plane results in the greatest drift. In a study in California, glyphosate was found at 800 m, the greatest distance studied.

In Canada, it has been determined that the buffer zones should be from 75 m to 1,200 m to prevent damage to the vegetation that should be protected.

Soil contamination: The information on the movement and persistence of glyphosate in the soil is varied. According to the EPA and other sources, glyphosate that reaches the soil is thoroughly adsorbed, even in soils low in clays and organic matter. Therefore, though highly soluble in water, it is considered immobile or almost immobile, remaining in the upper soil layers, with little propensity for percolation and with a low potential for runoff, except when adsorbed to colloidal material or particles suspended in the runoff water.

Several researchers state that glyphosate may be easily leached from some kinds of soil, i.e. that it may be released from the particles, and may be very mobile in the soil environment (Dinham, 1998). In a soil, 80% of the glyphosate was released in a period of two hours (Cox, 1995).

Losses due to volatization or photodecomposition are insignificant, but it is decomposed by microorganisms; there have been reports of half-lives in the soil (time that it takes for one-half of a compound to disappear from the environment) of approximately 60 days (two months), according to the EPA, and from 1 to 174 days (almost six months) for others. Nonetheless, the EPA adds that in field studies the residues are often found the following year.

Some studies speak of lengthy persistence in soil. The initial degradation is quicker than the later degradation of what remains, resulting in long persistence. Long persistence has been found in several studies, resulting in 249 days in agricultural soils and from 259 to 296 days in eight forest sites in Finland; 335 days in a forest site in Ontario (Canada); 360 days in three forest sites in British Columbia (Canada); and one to three years in 11 forest sites in Sweden.

It is not easy to detect residues of highly water-soluble substances like glyphosate, tebuthiuron, and imazapyr in the laboratory, because laboratory tests commonly work with organic solvents. Hence the importance of biological tests or the planting of susceptible crops, which may make it possible to detect the presence of herbicides when residues are no longer detected in the laboratory.

Contamination of waters: Glyphosate is highly soluble in water, with solubility of 12 grams/liter at 25EC. According to the EPA, it may enter aquatic ecosystems by accidental spraying, by drift, or by surface runoff. Due to its ionic state in water, it is not expected to be volatile in water or in soil. It is considered to disappear rapidly in water, as a result of adsorption to particles in suspension such as organic and mineral particles, to sediments, and probably due to microbial decomposition.

If it is accepted that glyphosate is easily adsorbed to soil particles, it will have little potential to move on to contaminate surface waters and groundwater. But if it is easily absorbed or is easily released from the soil particles, as mentioned in the previous point, the situation changes. What is clear is that glyphosate has been found contaminating surface waters and groundwater. For example, it contaminated two ponds on farm in Canada due to runoff, one due to an agricultural treatment, the other due to a spill; it contaminated surface waters in the Netherlands; and seven wells in the United States (one in Texas and six in Virginia) were found to be contaminated by glyphosate.

Its persistence in water is shorter than in soil. In Canada it has been found to persist from 12 to 60 days in soil pond waters, but it persists longer in the sediments at the bottom. The average life of the sediments was 120 days in a study done in Missouri, United States. The persistence was more than one year in sediments in Michigan and Oregon.

In the United Kingdom, since 1993 the Welsh Water Company has detected levels of glyphosate in waters at levels above those permissible levels set by the European Union.

Contamination of foods: Analyses of glyphosate residues are complicated and costly, therefore they are not done routinely by the government in the United States. Yet there are research studies that show that glyphosate may be taken by plants and moved to those parts used for food. For example, glyphosate has been found in strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, lettuce, carrots, and barley after application.

Its use prior to the wheat harvest to dry the grain results in "significant residues" in the grain, according to the World Health Organization; contains residues 2 to 4 times greater than the whole grain, and they are not lost during baking.

Glyphosate residues have been found in lettuce, carrots, and barley planted one year after the glyphosate was applied.

Effects on animals

Insects and beneficial arthropods: Glyphosate is toxic to some beneficial organisms such as parasitic wasps and other arthropod predators, and soil arthropods that are important for its aeration and in the formation of humus; and some aquatic insects.

Fish and other aquatic organisms: Different fish species have different susceptibilities to glyphosate. Acute toxicities in terms of the CL50 range from 3.2 ppm to 52 ppm, which means moderate toxicity. Yet Roundup is some 30 times more toxic to fish than glyphosate alone, i.e. it is from extremely to highly toxic to these aquatic organisms.

The factors that influence the toxicity of glyphosate and of products that contain it include: (a) the species; (b) water quality (glyphosate in soft water can be 20 times more toxic to rainbow trout than in hard water); (c) age is also a factor, for example Roundup may be four times more toxic to young rainbow trout than to older ones; (d) nutrition affects toxicity, toxicity being greater when the fish are hungry; (e) toxicity increases with temperature; the effect is greater on aquatic specifics susceptible to these changes.

Sub-lethal effects on fish may also be significant and occur at low concentrations in water. For example, in studies with rainbow trout, concentrations equivalent to one-half and one-third of CL50 caused erratic swimming, and the trout also showed difficulty breathing. The changes in conduct alter their capacity for feeding, migration, and reproduction, and they lose the capacity to defend themselves.

Birds: Glyphosate is moderately toxic to birds. In addition to direct effects, it may have indirect effects because it kills plants, therefore it may cause dramatic changes in the structure of the plant community, with a detrimental impact on birds, because they depend on the plants for food, protection, and nesting. This has been documented in studies of the populations exposed.

Small mammals: In field studies, populations of small mammals have also been affected by glyphosate, by death of the vegetation that they or their prey use for food or protection.

Earthworms: A study in New Zealand showed that glyphosate significantly affects the development and survival of one of the commonest worms in its agricultural soils. Applications every 15 days at low doses (1/20 the normal dose) reduced growth and increased the time for reaching maturity and mortality.

Effects on desirable plants: Glyphosate, as a broad-spectrum herbicide, has toxic effects on most plant species. It affects trees and hedge shrubs and near-by crops, and increases the susceptibility of the crops to disease. It may pose a risk to endangered species if applied in areas where they live.

In a study, glyphosate inhibited the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodes in clover for 120 days after treatment.

Resistant weeds: In 1996, ryegrass resistant to glyphosate was discovered in Australia.

Gene contamination by transgenic crops: Gene contamination in significant number of transgenic crops is inevitable. It has been found that the spread of pollen by the wind in large fields of crops occurs at much greater distances and in larger concentrations that what is predicted based on experimental lots. Therefore, the risk of transmitting the resistance to herbicides introduced by genetic engineering of crops to similar weeds is real.

Increase in the use of herbicides with Roundup-Ready crops: Herbicide-resistant crops will intensify and increase the dependency on herbicide use in agriculture, instead of diminishing it, as the manufacturers say, by increasing the adverse environmental effects in soils and water, and repercussions on health.

The development of resistance to glyphosate in weeds by gene flow, or the practices to minimize the risks of resistance in weeds, will perpetuate the practice of applying herbicide mixes. There is also a risk of re-introduction of herbicides to control encroaching crop populations and glyphosate-resistant weeds.

Increase in the use of insecticides and fungicides: The toxicity of glyphosate to organisms beneficial to the soil, to beneficial predator arthropods, and its capacity to increase the susceptibility of the crops to diseases means that its use leads farmers to step up the use of insecticides and fungicides.

Failures in the production of Roundup-ready cotton: Roundup Ready cotton, resistant to glyphosate, was introduced in the United States in 1997. In the first crop, 12,000 hectares failed. One-fourth of 200 farmers licensed to grow the cotton found deformed capsules xx(other?) and early loss of capsules.

Referencias

Collins, Ronald T. And Helling, Charles S. Increased control of Erythroxylum sp. By glyphosate utilizing various surfactants. DRAFT COPY. Weed Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, BARC-W, 10300 Baltimore Ave, Beltsville, MD USA 1999

Cortina, Germán D. Evaluación del impacto mutagénico del glifosato en cultivos de linfocitos. Fundación Esawá. Florencia, Caquetá. 13 p.

Cox, Caroline. Glyphosate, Part 1: Toxicology. En: Journal of Pesticides Reform, Volume 15, Number 3, Fall 1995. Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, Eugene, OR. USA. 13 p.

Cox, Caroline. Glyphosate, Part 2: Human exposure and ecological effects. En: Journal of Pesticides Reform, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 1995. Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, Eugene, OR. USA. 14 p.

Dinham, Barbara. Resistance to glyphosate. En: Pesticides News 41: 5, September 1998. The Pesticides Trust. PAN-Europe. London, UK.

Dinham, Barbara. "Life sciences" take over. En: Pesticides News 44: 7, June 1999. The Pesticides Trust. PAN-Europe. London, UK.

Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario ICA. División Insumos Agrícolas. Listado general de plaguicidas registrados hasta agosto 26 de 1998. Santafé de Bogotá. 21 p.

Meister, Richard. 1995 Farm Chemicals Handbook. Meister Publishing Company. Willoughby, USA. 922 p.

EPA. Technical Fact Sheets on: Glyphosate. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. Document obtained over the Internet, June, 1999.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service by Information Ventures, Inc. Glyphosate, Pesticide Fact Sheets. November 1995.

 

Administration Route

Risks

Cate-
gory

USA label

Oral
(mg/kg)

Dermal
(mg/kg)

Inhalation
(mg/L)

Eye irritation

Skin irritation

I

DANGER
Poison

£ 50

£ 200

£ 0.2

Corrosive: corneal opacity for 7 days.

Corrosive.

II

WARNING

>50-500

>200-2000

>0.2-2

reversible corneal opacity for 7 days; persistent irritation for 7 days.

Severe irritation for 72 hours.

III

CAUTION

>500-5000

>2000-20,000

>2-20

Non-corneal opacity; reversible irritation in seven days.

Moderate irritation for 72 hours. 

IV

 

>5000

>20,000

>20

Non-irritating.

Light irritation for 72 hours. 

 

Table 2: Ecotoxilogical categories

Toxicity Category

Mammals

(Acute oral)1

mg/kg

Birds

(Acute oral)2

mg/kg

Birds

(in the diet)3

ppm

Aquatic organisms4

ppm

Very highly toxic

<10

<10

<50

<0.1

Highly toxic

10-50

10-50

50-500

0.1-1

Moderately toxic

>5-500

>5-500

>50-1000

>1-10

Lightly toxic

>50-2000

>50-2000

>1000-5000

>10-100

Practically non-toxic

>2000

>2000

>5000

>100

1 Refleja la dosis suministrada a los animales de prueba con base en el peso del cuerpo.
2 Concentración en la dieta. No se relaciona con el peso del cuerpo del animal. Medida de exposición ambiental.

3 Concentración en el agua. No se relaciona con el peso del cuerpo del animal. Medida de exposición ambiental.

Fuente:

Information Ventures, Inc. under U.S. Forest Service Contract. November 1995.

http://infoventures.com/e-hlth/

 

espanol

Efectos sobre la salud y el ambiente
de herbicidas que contienen glifosato

Elsa Nivia

Introducción

El glifosato es un herbicida sistémico que actúa en post-emergencia, no selectivo, de amplio espectro, usado para matar plantas no deseadas como pastos anuales y perennes, hierbas de hoja ancha y especies leñosas. El glifosato mismo es un ácido, pero es comúnmente usado en forma de sales, más comúnmente la sal isopropilamina de glifosato, o sal isopropilamina de N-(fosfonometil) glicina. Su nombre comercial más conocido es el Roundup. En Colombia, además de su uso como herbicida en la agricultura, se usa también como desecante de granos y por vía aérea como madurante en la caña de azúcar y en los programas de erradicación de cultivos ilícitos, erradicando simultáneamente cultivos alimenticios y especies silvestres, sin que se hayan estudiado los verdaderos impactos de su utilización sobre la salud de las personas y el medio ambiente.

Las ventas mundiales del glifosato, cuyo fabricante básico es Monsanto, superan los 1.500 millones de dólares actualmente y se calcula que crecerán a 2.000 millones de dólares en los próximos 5 años, equivalentes a más de 40.000 toneladas de ingrediente activo (Dinham, 1998). Actualmente las ventas de este herbicida representan cerca del 40% del mercado de agroquímicos a nivel mundial de Monsanto (ventas mundiales totales de 4.032 millones de dólares en 1998, un 23.2% mayores que en 1997). Monsanto en 1998 ocupó el segundo lugar en la comercialización de agroquímicos después de Novartis y el primer lugar en la producción y venta de semillas transgénicas, modificadas genéticamente para que los cultivos sean resistentes al glifosato e incrementar aún más las ventas de este agrotóxico (Dinham, 1999).

Entre 1986 y 1996 el uso del glifosato se triplicó en Estados Unidos y en Europa su uso se incrementó en 129% entre 1991 y 1995, por las declaraciones de Monsanto de que el herbicida no es peligroso para los humanos y que es ambientalmente seguro. Pero de acuerdo con informaciones de Cox (1995) y de Dinham (1998), existen resultados de investigaciones científicas acerca de herbicidas que contienen glifosato, independientes de Monsanto, que contradicen indicaciones de la empresa fabricante del veneno y muestran una visión muy diferente sobre los riesgos de salud y ambientales de estos herbicidas.

Los plaguicidas antes de salir al mercado pasan por el proceso de la formulación, durante el cual los ingredientes activos son mezclados con otras sustancias como solventes, coadyuvantes y otras, denominadas como "ingredientes inertes", sobre las cuales no se da información en las etiquetas y que en muchos casos son sustancias activas biológica, química o toxicológicamente, que pueden conferir a las formulaciones comerciales, características diferentes a las encontradas en cualquiera de los componentes por separado. Ésto significa que si no se revisan y reconocen las pruebas toxicológicas con los plaguicidas comerciales, como se usan realmente, es imposible evaluar con seguridad sus riesgos sobre el ambiente y la salud de las personas.

La mayoría de productos que contienen glifosato están hechos o se usan con un surfactante para ayudar al glifosato a penetrar los tejidos de la planta, el cual le confiere características toxicológicas a la formulación comercial diferentes a las del glifosato solo. En el caso del Roundup, la formulación herbicida más utilizada, se sabe que contiene el surfactante polioxietileno amina (POEA), ácidos orgánicos de glifosato relacionados, isopropilamina y agua. En el presente estudio se hará referencia a características del glifosato sólo pero también a estudios científicos realizados con el Roundup.

Nombres comerciales

En Colombia el glifosato está registrado por Monsanto (ICA 1998) bajo los nombres comerciales de Roundup, Rocket, Rocky, Faena, Patrol, Squadron, Ranger y Fuete. Pero también otras empresas agroquímicas tienen registradas formulaciones comerciales con base en el mismo ingrediente activo, bajo los nombres de: Batalla (Bayer); Glyfoagri (Disagri); Socar (Agrevo); Crossout, Candela y Glyfosan (Agroser); Glifonox (Crystal); Glifosol (Coljap); Stelar (Dow); Panzer (Invequímica); Glyphogan (Magan); Faena (Proficol); Regio (Quimor); Sunup (Sundat); Glifosato Agrogen (Agroquímicos del Cauca) y Tunda (Fertilizantes Cafeteros).

Modo de acción

La acción herbicida del glifosato probablemente se debe a la inhibición de la biosíntesis de aminoácidos aromáticos (fenilalanina, tirosina y triptofano), usados en la síntesis de proteínas y que son esenciales para el crecimiento y sobrevivencia de la mayoría de las plantas. El glifosato inhibe la enzima 5-enolpiruvilchiquimato-3-fosfato sintasa, importante en la síntesis de aminoácidos aromáticos; también puede inhibir o reprimir la acción de otras dos enzimas involucradas en otros pasos de la síntesis de los mismos aminoácidos, la clorismato mutasa y prefrenato hidratasa. Todas estas enzimas forman parte de la vía del ácido chiquímico, presente en plantas superiores y microorganismos pero no en animales.

El glifosato puede afectar también otras enzimas no relacionadas con la vía del ácido chiquímico. En caña de azúcar reduce la actividad de una de las enzimas involucradas en el metabolismo del azúcar, la ácido invertasa. Esta reducción parece estar mediada por auxinas, hormonas de las plantas.

El glifosato también afecta sistemas enzimáticos en animales y humanos. En ratas, cuando se les inyectó en el abdomen en un estudio, disminuyó la actividad de dos enzimas detoxificantes, el citocromo P-450 y una monooxigenasa; también disminuyó la actividad intestinal de otra enzima detoxificante, la aril hidrocarbono hidroxilasa (Cox 1995).

Formulaciones más tóxicas de glifosato 

Investigaciones:  De acuerdo con investigaciones en invernaderos en Maryland (Estados Unidos) y de campo en Hawaii, llevados a cabo entre 1995 y 1997, y con la adición de dos surfactantes, AL77 y Optima, al glifosato en la formulación Rodeo, se incrementó cuatro veces la toxicidad del glifosato a la coca, comparado con la formula comercial Roundup:  1.1 kg/ha de glifosato comercial (Roundup) (Collins & Helling).

  Supuestamente, de acuerdo con este estudio, la mezcla del herbicida actualmente usada en Colombia para los programas de erradicación de la coca habría sido modificada, con "excelentes" resultados.

  Este supuesto cambio de fórmula coincide con denuncias de las comunidades afectadas, en el sentido de que se están causando mas daños a pastos y cultivos alimenticios, y también son más graves los síntomas de intoxicaciones.  En realidad no se conoce exactamente que formulación se están utilizando.  Los dos nuevos surfactantes propuestos tienen la siguiente composición:

  AL77:  Mezcla 1:1 en volumen de Agri-Dex y Silwet L-77.

Agri-Dex: mezcla de derivados polietoxilados de petróleo con base en parafina, de alto peso, y emulsificantes con base en sorbitan éster.

Silwet L-77: polialkileneoxido-modificado heptametiltrisiloxano.
OPTIMA:  mezcla de alquil aminas polietoxiladas [C8-C18], alquil polioxietilen glicoles, y ácidos orgánicos.

Efectos sobre la salud

Toxicidad aguda: Los plaguicidas que contienen glifosato como el Roundup están registrados en Colombia en la clase toxicológica IV, levemente tóxicos, basados en la DL50 oral a ratas del ingrediente activo, considerada mayor de 5.000 mg/kg (anteriormente se consideraba de 4.320 mg/kg, clase toxicológica III). Pero en Estados Unidos estos herbicidas ya han sido reclasificados por la Agencia de Protección Ambiental EPA en la clase II, altamente tóxicos, por ser irritantes de los ojos (Meister 1995). La EPA lo tiene clasificado como un irritante medio, pero la Organización Mundial de la Salud ha encontrado efectos más serios; en varios estudios con conejos fue calificado como "fuertemente" irritante o "extremadamente" irritante (Cox 1995). El ingrediente activo glifosato solo está clasificado en categoría I, extremadamente tóxico.

Tanto el glifosato solo como los productos que lo contienen son más tóxicos por vía dermal e inhalatoria que por ingestión, las vías comunes en la exposición ocupacional. En varios ensayos, la inhalación de Roundup en ratas causó signos de intoxicación en todos los grupos estudiados y aún en las concentraciones más bajas probadas. Los síntomas incluyeron secreción nasal oscura, jadeo, ojos congestionados, actividad reducida, pelo erizado, pérdida de peso corporal y los pulmones se encontraron congestionados con sangre.

El Roundup está en varios países entre los primeros plaguicidas que causan incidentes de envenenamiento en humanos. La mayoría de éstos han involucrado irritaciones dermales y oculares en trabajadores, después de exposición durante la mezcla, cargue o aplicación. También se han reportado náuseas y mareos después de la exposición, así como problemas respiratorios, aumento de la presión sanguínea y reacciones alérgicas.

En casos de envenenamientos estudiados por médicos japoneses, la mayoría de ellos por ingestión accidental o intencional de Roundup, pero también por exposiciones ocupacionales, se reportó que los síntomas de envenenamiento agudo pueden incluir dolor gastrointestinal, pérdida masiva de líquido gastrointestinal, vómito, exceso de fluido en los pulmones, congestión o disfunción pulmonar, neumonía, pérdida de conciencia y destrucción de glóbulos rojos, electrocardiogramas anormales, baja presión sanguínea y daño o falla renal.

Gran parte de estos síntomas están actualmente siendo padecidos por los indígenas Yanaconas habitantes del Macizo Colombiano en el Departamento del Cauca en Colombia, particularmente niños, quienes están recibiendo fumigaciones indiscriminadas sobre casas de habitación, escuelas y personas trabajando en los campos de cultivo (adicionalmente se están destruyendo los pastos de los que depende la alimentación de los animales, y cultivos de papa, maíz, cebolla, ullucos, cilantro y otros, de los que depende la sobrevivencia de estas comunidades).

Se ha considerado que el surfactante que lleva el Roundup es el causante principal de la toxicidad de esta formulación. El POEA tiene una toxicidad aguda más de tres veces mayor que la del glifosato, causa daño gastrointestinal y al sistema nervioso central, problemas respiratorios y destrucción de glóbulos rojos en humanos. Además está contaminado con 1-4 dioxano, el cual ha causado cáncer en animales y daño a hígado y riñones en humanos.

La EPA ha encontrado que exposiciones a residuos de glifosato en aguas de consumo humano por encima del límite máximo autorizado de 0.7 mg/l, pueden causar respiración acelerada y congestión pulmonar.

Toxicidad crónica: El glifosato también se ha encontrado tóxico a largo plazo en estudios con animales. Con dosis altas en ratas (900-1.200 mg/kg/día), se ha reportado disminución del peso del cuerpo en hembras; mayor incidencia de cataratas y degeneración del cristalino en machos y mayor peso del hígado en machos. En dosis bajas (400 mg/kg/día) ocurrió inflamación de la membrana mucosa estomacal en los dos sexos.

En ratones con dosis altas (alrededor de 4.800 mg/kg/día) se presentó pérdida de peso del cuerpo, excesivo crecimiento y posterior muerte de células hepáticas particulares e inflamación crónica de los riñones en machos; en hembras ocurrió excesivo crecimiento de células de los riñones. A dosis bajas (814 mg/kg/día) se presentó excesiva división celular en la vejiga urinaria (Cox 1995).

Para la EPA, exposiciones continuadas a residuos en aguas en concentraciones por encima de 0.7 mg/L pueden causar daño renal.

Efectos reproductivos: En pruebas de laboratorio con ratas y conejos el glifosato afectó la calidad del semen y la cantidad de espermatozoides (Cox 1995, Dinham, 1998). De acuerdo con la EPA, exposiciones continuadas a residuos en aguas en concentraciones por encima de 0.7 mg/L pueden causar efectos reproductivos en seres humanos.

Acción cancerígena: La EPA tuvo inicialmente clasificado al glifosato como clase "D": "no clasificable como carcinógeno humano". Posteriormente, a comienzos de la década de 1990, lo ubicó en clase "C": "Posible carcinógeno humano. Actualmente lo tiene clasificado como Grupo E, "evidencia de no carcinogénesis en humanos". Cuando se emitió esta clasificación se añadió que la clasificación se basaba en la evidencia disponible hasta el momento y que no debía ser interpretada como una conclusión definitiva de que el producto no fuera un carcinógeno en cualquier circunstancia. Esta afirmación probablemente se debió a que el potencial del glifosato para causar cáncer ha estado sujeto a controversia desde los primeros estudios a comienzos de la década de 1980.

El primer estudio (1979-1981) encontró un incremento en tumores testiculares intersticiales en ratas machos a la dosis más alta probada (30 mg/kg/día), así como un incremento en la frecuencia de un cáncer de tiroides en hembras. El segundo estudio (completado en 1983) encontró incrementos relacionados con la dosis en la frecuencia de un tumor renal raro. Otro estudio (1988-1990) encontró un incremento en el número de tumores de páncreas e hígado en ratas machos, junto con un incremento en el mismo cáncer de tiroides encontrado anteriormente en hembras. Todos estos tumores no fueron considerados por la EPA relacionados con el compuesto: o se afirmaba que no había significancia estadística, que no era posible distinguir consistentemente entre los tumores de la tiroides y el cáncer, que no había tendencia relacionada con la dosis o que no había progresión a la malignidad.

Las dudas sobre el potencial carcinogénico del glifosato persisten, porque este ingrediente contiene el contaminante N-nitroso glifosato (NNG) a 0.1 ppm o menos, o este compuesto puede formarse en el ambiente al combinarse con nitrato (presente en saliva humana o fertilizantes), y es conocido que la mayoría de compuestos N-nitroso son cancerígenos. Y no existe nivel de seguridad frente a sustancias cancerígenas. Adicionalmente, en el caso del Roundup el surfactante POEA está contaminado con 1-4 dioxano, el cual ha causado cáncer en animales y daño a hígado y riñones en humanos. El formaldehido, otro carcinógeno conocido, es también otro producto de descomposición del glifosato.

Acción mutagénica Ninguno de los estudios sobre mutagénesis requeridos para el registro del glifosato ha mostrado acción mutagénica. Pero los resultados son diferentes cuando los estudios se realizan con formulaciones comerciales a base de glifosato: en estudios de laboratorio con varios organismos se encontró que el Roundup y el Pondmaster (otra formulación) incrementaron la frecuencia de mutaciones letales recesivas ligadas al sexo en mosca de la fruta; el Roundup en dosis altas, mostró un incremento en la frecuencia de intercambio de cromátidas hermanas en linfocitos humanos y fue débilmente mutagénico en la bacteria Salmonella. También se ha reportado daño al DNA en pruebas de laboratorio con tejidos y órganos de ratón (Cox 1995).

Efectos ambientales

Deriva: Dosis subletales de glifosato arrastradas por el viento (deriva) dañan flores silvestres y pueden afectar algunas especies a más de 20 metros del sitio asperjado. Al aplicar un plaguicida la deriva es inevitable y dependerá de varias circunstancias, entre ellas la forma de aplicación, terrestre o aérea; la velocidad del viento. Las distancias medidas para las diferentes técnicas de aplicación son las siguientes:

Aplicaciones terrestres: entre 14% y 78% del glifosato aplicado sale del sitio. Especies sensibles murieron a 40 metros. Los modelos indican que especies susceptibles pueden morir a 100 metros. Se han encontrado residuos a 400 metros del sitio de aplicación terrestre.

Aplicaciones con helicóptero: Entre 41% y 82% del glifosato aplicado con helicóptero se desplaza fuera del sitio. En un estudio en California se encontró glifosato a 800 m, la mayor distancia estudiada.

Aplicaciones con avión: Con este sistema ocurre la deriva a mayores distancias. En un estudio en California el glifosato se encontró a 800 m, la mayor distancia estudiada.

En Canadá han calculado que las zonas buffer deben estar entre 75 y 1.200 m para evitar daños a la vegetación que se quiere proteger.

Contaminación del suelo: La información sobre el movimiento y la persistencia del glifosato en suelos es variada. De acuerdo con la EPA y otras fuentes, el glifosato que llega al suelo es fuertemente adsorbido, aún en suelos con bajos contenidos de arcillas y materia orgánica. Por ésto, aunque es altamente soluble en agua, se considera que es inmóvil o casi inmóvil, permaneciendo en las capas superiores del suelo, siendo poco propenso a la percolación y con bajo potencial de escorrentía, excepto cuando se adsorbe a material coloidal o partículas suspendidas en el agua de escorrentía.

Varios investigadores afirman que el glifosato puede ser fácilmente desorbido en algunas clases de suelo, o sea que se puede soltar de las partículas pudiendo ser muy móvil en el ambiente del suelo (Dinham, 1998). En un suelo, 80% del glifosato adicionado desorbió o se soltó en un período de dos horas (Cox 1995).

Las pérdidas por volatilización o fotodescomposición son insignificantes, pero es descompuesto por microorganismos, reportándose vidas medias en el suelo (tiempo que tarda en desaparecer la mitad de un compuesto del ambiente) de alrededor de 60 días (2 meses) según la EPA y de 1 a 174 días (casi 6 meses) para otros. Sin embargo, la EPA añade que en estudios de campo los residuos se encuentran a menudo al año siguiente.

Existen estudios que hablan de una larga persistencia en suelos. Se considera que la degradación inicial es más rápida que la degradación posterior de lo que permanece, resultando en larga persistencia. La persistencia larga se ha encontrado en varios estudios, resultando en 249 días en suelos agrícolas y entre 259 a 296 días en ocho sitios forestales de Finnish; 335 días en un sitio forestal de Ontario (Canadá); 360 días en tres sitios forestales en Columbia Británica (Canadá); y de 1 a 3 años en 11 sitios forestales de Suecia.

No es fácil detectar residuos en laboratorio de sustancias altamente solubles en agua como el glifosato, tebuthiuron e imazapyr, porque en las pruebas de laboratorio se trabaja comúnmente con solventes orgánicos. De ahí que sean importantes las pruebas biológicas o siembra de cultivos susceptibles, los cuales pueden permitir detectar presencia de herbicidas cuando ya no se detecten residuos en laboratorio.

Contaminación de aguas: El glifosato es altamente soluble en agua, con una solubilidad de 12 gramos/litro a 25ºC. De acuerdo con la EPA, puede entrar a ecosistemas acuáticos por aspersión accidental, por derivas o por escorrentía superficial. Debido a su estado iónico en el agua no se espera que se volatilice de aguas ni de suelos. Se considera que desaparece rápidamente del agua, como resultado de adsorción a partículas en suspensión como materia orgánica y mineral, a sedimentos y probablemente por descomposición microbial.

Si se acepta que el glifosato se adsorbe fácilmente a partículas de suelo tendrá poco potencial para moverse a contaminar aguas superficiales y subterráneas. Pero si se desorbe o suelta fácilmente de las partículas de suelo como se mencionó en el punto anterior la situación cambia. Lo cierto es que el glifosato se ha encontrado contaminando aguas superficiales y subterráneas. Por ejemplo, contaminó por escorrentía dos estanques en granjas de Canadá, uno por un tratamiento agrícola y el otro por un derrame; contaminó aguas superficiales en Holanda; y siete pozos en Estados Unidos (uno en Texas y seis en Virginia) se encontraron contaminados con glifosato.

Su persistencia en aguas es más corta que en suelos. En Canadá se ha encontrado que persiste de 12 a 60 días en aguas de estanques pero persiste más tiempo en los sedimentos del fondo. La vida media en sedimentos fue de 120 días en un estudio en Missouri, Estados Unidos. La persistencia fue mayor de un año en sedimentos en Michigan y en Oregon.

En el Reino Unido, la Welsh Water Company ha detectado niveles de glifosato en aguas desde 1993, por encima de los límites permisibles fijados por la Unión Europea.

Contaminación de alimentos: Los análisis de residuos de glifosato son complejos y costosos, por eso no son realizados rutinariamente por el gobierno en Estados Unidos. Pero existen investigaciones que demuestran que el glifosato puede ser tomado por las plantas y movido a las partes que se usan como alimento. Por ejemplo, se ha encontrado glifosato en fresas, moras azules, frambuesas, lechugas, zanahoria y cebada después de su aplicación.

Su uso antes de la cosecha de trigo para secar el grano resulta en "residuos significativos" en el grano según la Organización Mundial de la Salud; el afrecho contiene residuos 2 a 4 veces mayores que el grano completo y no se pierden durante el horneado.

Se han encontrado residuos de glifosato en lechuga, zanahoria y cebada, sembrados un año después de que el glifosato fue aplicado.

Efectos en animales:

Insectos y otros artrópodos benéficos: El glifosato es tóxico a algunos organismos benéficos como avispas parasitoides y otros artrópodos predadores, a artrópodos del suelo importantes en su aireación y en la formación de humus; y a algunos insectos acuáticos.

Peces y otros organismos acuáticos: Diferentes especies de peces tienen diferentes susceptibilidades al glifosato. Las toxicidades agudas en términos de la CL50 oscilan entre 3.2 a 52 ppm, lo cual significa toxicidad moderada. Pero el Roundup es unas 30 veces más tóxico a peces que el glifosato solo, o sea que es desde extremada a altamente tóxico a éstos organismos acuáticos.

Hay factores que influyen en la toxicidad del glifosato y de productos que lo contienen, como a) la especie; b) la calidad del agua (el glifosato en aguas blandas puede ser unas 20 veces más tóxico a la trucha arco iris que en aguas duras); c) la edad también influye, por ejemplo el Roundup puede ser cuatro veces más tóxico a trucha arco iris en estados juveniles que en edades mayores; d) La nutrición influye en la toxicidad, siendo mayor cuando los peces están hambrientos; e) Respecto a la temperatura, la toxicidad aumenta al aumentar la temperatura, siendo mayor el efecto en especies acuáticas susceptibles a estos cambios.

Efectos subletales sobre peces también pueden ser significativos y ocurren a bajas concentraciones en el agua. Por ejemplo, en estudios con trucha arco iris y tilapia, concentraciones equivalentes a la mitad y a la tercera parte de la CL50 causaron nado errático y la trucha también mostró dificultad para respirar. Los cambios de comportamiento alteran su capacidad de alimentación, migración y reproducción y pierden capacidad de defensa.

Aves: El glifosato es moderadamente tóxico a aves. Además de efectos directos puede tener impactos indirectos porque mata plantas, por tanto puede causar cambios dramáticos en la estructura de la comunidad de plantas afectando las poblaciones de aves, porque ellas dependen de las plantas para alimentarse, protegerse y anidar. Esto ha sido documentado con estudios de poblaciones expuestas.

Pequeños mamíferos: En estudios de campo, poblaciones de pequeños mamíferos también se han visto afectadas a causa del glifosato, por muerte de vegetación que ellos o sus presas utilizan para alimentarse o protegerse.

Lombrices de tierra: Un estudio en Nueva Zelanda mostró que el glifosato afecta significativamente el desarrollo y la sobrevivencia de una de las lombrices más comunes en sus suelos agrícolas. Aplicaciones cada 15 días en dosis bajas (1/20 de la dosis normal), redujeron el crecimiento e incrementaron el tiempo de madurez y la mortalidad.

Efectos sobre plantas deseables: El glifosato, por ser herbicida de amplio espectro, tiene efectos tóxicos sobre la mayoría de especies de plantas. Afecta árboles y arbustos de los cercos y cultivos cercanos, e incrementa la susceptibilidad de los cultivos a enfermedades. Puede ser un riesgo para especies en peligro de extinción si se aplica en áreas donde ellas viven.

En un estudio el glifosato inhibió la formación de nódulos fijadores de nitrógeno en trébol durante 120 días después del tratamiento.

Malezas resistentes: En 1996 se descubrió ryegrass resistente a glifosato en Australia.

Flujo de genes de cultivos transgénicos: El flujo de genes en niveles significativos de cultivos transgénicos es inevitable. Se ha comprobado que la dispersión del polen por el viento de campos de cultivo grandes, ocurre a distancias mucho mayores y en mayores concentraciones que lo que se predice a partir de lotes experimentales. Por tanto, es real el riesgo de transmitir a malezas similares, la resistencia a herbicidas introducida por ingeniería genética a los cultivos.

Incremento del uso de herbicidas con cultivos Roundup Ready: Los cultivos resistentes a herbicidas intensificarán e incrementarán la dependencia del uso de herbicidas en la agricultura en vez de disminuirla como dicen los fabricantes, con el incremento de efectos ambientales adversos en suelos y aguas y repercusiones en la salud.

El desarrollo de la resistencia al glifosato en malezas por el flujo de genes, o las prácticas para minimizar los riesgos de la resistencia en las malezas, perpetuarán la práctica de aplicar mezclas de herbicidas. También existe el riesgo de que se reintroduzcan herbicidas para controlar poblaciones feroces de cultivos y malezas resistentes al glifosato.

Incremento del uso de insecticidas y fungicidas: La toxicidad del glifosato a organismos benéficos del suelo, a artrópodos benéficos predadores y su capacidad de incrementar la susceptibilidad de los cultivos a enfermedades, significa que su uso lleva a los agricultores a incrementar el uso de insecticidas y fungicidas.

Fracasos en producción de algodón Roundup Ready: El algodón Roundup Ready resistente al glifosato fue introducido en Estados Unidos en 1997. En la primera cosecha fracasaron 12.000 hectáreas. Una cuarta parte de 200 agricultores con licencia para cultivar el algodón encontraron cápsulas deformadas y pérdida temprana de cápsulas.

Referencias

Collins, Ronald T. And Helling, Charles S. Increased control of Erythroxylum sp. By glyphosate utilizing various surfactants. DRAFT COPY. Weed Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, BARC-W, 10300 Baltimore Ave, Beltsville, MD USA 1999

Cortina, Germán D. Evaluación del impacto mutagénico del glifosato en cultivos de linfocitos. Fundación Esawá. Florencia, Caquetá. 13 p.

Cox, Caroline. Glyphosate, Part 1: Toxicology. En: Journal of Pesticides Reform, Volume 15, Number 3, Fall 1995. Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, Eugene, OR. USA. 13 p.

Cox, Caroline. Glyphosate, Part 2: Human exposure and ecological effects. En: Journal of Pesticides Reform, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 1995. Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, Eugene, OR. USA. 14 p.

Dinham, Barbara. Resistance to glyphosate. En: Pesticides News 41: 5, September 1998. The Pesticides Trust. PAN-Europe. London, UK.

Dinham, Barbara. "Life sciences" take over. En: Pesticides News 44: 7, June 1999. The Pesticides Trust. PAN-Europe. London, UK.

Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario ICA. División Insumos Agrícolas. Listado general de plaguicidas registrados hasta agosto 26 de 1998. Santafé de Bogotá. 21 p.

Meister, Richard. 1995 Farm Chemicals Handbook. Meister Publishing Company. Willoughby, USA. 922 p.

EPA. Technical Fact Sheets on: Glyphosate. National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. Documento obtenido por Internet, junio de 1999.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service by Information Ventures, Inc. Glyphosate, Pesticide Fact Sheets. November 1995.

 

 

 

Ruta de administración

Riesgos

Cate-
goría

Señal en
EE.UU.

Oral
(mg/kg)

Dermal
(mg/kg)

Inhalación
(mg/L)

Irritación ojos

Irritación piel

I

DANGER
Poison

£ 50

£ 200

£ 0.2

Corrosivo: opacidad de la córnea no reversible en los primeros 7 días

Corrosivo

II

WARNING

>50-500

>200-2000

>0.2-2

Opacidad de la córnea reversible los primeros 7 días; irritación persistente por 7 días

Irritación severa en 72 horas

III

CAUTION

>500-5000

>2000-20,000

>2-20

Opacidad no corneal; irritación reversible en 7 días

Irritación moderada en 72 horas

IV

 

>5000

>20,000

>20

No irritación

Irritación leve en 72 horas

 

Tabla 2: Categorías ecotoxicológicas

Categoría

toxicológica

Mamíferos

(Aguda oral)1

mg/kg

Aves

(Aguda oral)2

mg/kg

Aves

(En la dieta)3

ppm

Organismos

Acuáticos4

ppm

Muy altamente tóxico

<10

<10

<50

<0.1

Altamente tóxico

10-50

10-50

50-500

0.1-1

Moderadamente tóxico

>5-500

>5-500

>50-1000

>1-10

Levemente tóxico

>50-2000

>50-2000

>1000-5000

>10-100

Prácticamente no tóxico

>2000

>2000

>5000

>100

1 Refleja la dosis suministrada a los animales de prueba con base en el peso del cuerpo.
2 Concentración en la dieta. No se relaciona con el peso del cuerpo del animal. Medida de exposición ambiental.

3 Concentración en el agua. No se relaciona con el peso del cuerpo del animal. Medida de exposición ambiental.

Fuente:

Information Ventures, Inc. under U.S. Forest Service Contract. November 1995.

http://infoventures.com/e-hlth/