JEN CHAPIN
Click artist name above for photos and more info.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 9, 2004

ALISON KRAUSS:

ROUNDER RECORDING ARTIST BECOMES GRAMMY'S MOST-HONORED FEMALE MUSICIAN

THREE WINS AT 2004 GRAMMY AWARDS PUT KRAUSS' CAREER TOTAL AT 17

KRAUSS RETURNS TO L.A. FEB 29 FOR OSCAR PERFORMANCE

Rounder recording artist Alison Krauss became the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences' most honored female musician yesterday, at the 46th Annual Grammy Awards ceremony. She won three awards, bringing her career total to 17. Krauss - who also performed with Sarah McLachlin on last night's television broadast of the Grammys - won in the following categories: Best Bluegrass album, for the Alison Krauss + Union Station release 'Live'; Best Country Instrumental, for the song "Cluck Old Hen" from 'Live'; and Best Country Collaboration with Vocals, for her duet with James Taylor "How's The World Treating You" from the album 'Livin' Lovin' Losin': Songs of the Louvin Brothers.'

See below for a story on Krauss' career Grammy wins that ran in today's LA Times.

Krauss will return to LA on February 29 for a performance at the 76th annual Oscars. Two songs she recorded for the 'Cold Mountain' soundtrack - "The Scarlet Tide" written by Elvis Costello and T Bone Burnett, and "You Will Be My Ain True Love" written by Sting - have been nominated for an Academy Award in the 'Best Original Song' category.

Alison Krauss + Union Station are currently recording a new studio album scheduled to be released later this year.

For more information please contact Matt Hanks at Shore Fire Media: 718.522.7171 ext 17 / mhanks@shorefire.com

--

LOS ANGELES TIMES, February 9, 2004

Krauss wins Nos.15-16-17

The bluegrass singer and fiddler moves into the female career lead; Franklin takes her 16th.

By Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer

A bluegrass princess has replaced the Queen of Soul as the Grammys' top female winner.

Aretha Franklin had already collected six Grammys before Alison Krauss was born in 1971, but on Sunday Krauss won three times to bring her total to 17. Franklin, 61, took her first since 1988, making her career tally 16.

"There's no way to really comprehend something like that," said Krauss, 32. "I've always loved [Franklin's] voice. Hasn't everybody? I've got her records and a biography on video. I remember going to the jukebox when I was a kid and playing her records, [singing] 'Who's zoomin' who....' Whoa! Isn't she great?

"I mean, I'm still at the stage of my career where I'm always pinching myself to make sure I'm not dreaming when I think about how great it is to be making music at all with the band ... to be able to make a living doing what you love."

The singer and fiddler has accumulated her awards steadily since her first one in 1990, winning in a variety of roles Ü instrumentalist, collaborator, producer, vocalist. Her Grammys Sunday came for country instrumental and bluegrass album, both with her band Union Station and a duet with James Taylor on a song from an album tribute to the Louvin Brothers.

Krauss has risen to the Grammys' top echelon while resisting the lure of commercial pop crossover.

"People in bluegrass feel that they are truly part of a tradition that is all about being devoted to the quality of the music," she said. "The only thing we have to do when we go into the studio is be concerned with making the best record we can make."

Times Staff Writer Robert Hilburn contributed to this article.

To print this page, please click inside this frame, then select Print from the File menu. Make sure "Print Background" is NOT selected.

<- Back