George Glazer Gallery, Antiques, New York

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Plate 2: Sikkim, Mexico, Brasil, New Guinea, Brazil
Plate 2: Sikkim, Mexico, Brasil, New Guinea, Brazil
Plate 3: Amazon, Peru, Madagascar, Brazil, Venezuela
Plate 3: Amazon, Peru, Madagascar, Brazil, Venezuela
Plate 4: Guyana, Brazil, India, Borneo
Plate 4: Guyana, Brazil, India, Borneo
Plate 7: Madagascar, Guyana, Venezuela
Plate 7: Madagascar, Guyana, Venezuela
Plate 8: India, Venezuela, North America, Himalayas, Congo
Plate 8: India, Venezuela, North America, Himalayas, Congo
Plate 9: Tonkin, Sikkim, Indio Malaysia
Plate 9: Tonkin, Sikkim, Indio Malaysia
Plate 10: India, Borneo, Sikkim, India, Equator
Plate 10: India, Borneo, Sikkim, India, Equator
Plate 11: Colombia, Congo, Malaysia, Brazil
Plate 11: Colombia, Congo, Malaysia, Brazil
Plate 13: Congo, Celebes, China, Congo
Plate 13: Congo, Celebes, China, Congo
Plate 14: Mexico, Congo, China, Europe
Plate 14: Mexico, Congo, China, Europe
Plate 15: Australia, Guyana, Brazil, Peru
Plate 15: Australia, Guyana, Brazil, Peru
Plate 16: Colombia, Malacca, Batjan
Plate 16: Colombia, Malacca, Batjan
Eugene Alain (E.A.) Seguy
Papillons
Editions Duchartre et Van Buggenhoudt, Paris: c. 1920s
Pouchoir prints
17.5 x 12.5 inches each
$500 to $750 each
Brilliantly and boldly colored butterflies from around the world are shown in interesting arrangements in prints from a set of 20 by E.A. Seguy. The artist describes them as "un monde somptueux de formes et de couleurs" -- a world of sumptuous forms and colors. He explained that they were intended to provide a scientific record of rare specimens from museums and private collections, to serve as inspiration for decorative arts designers, and to be beautiful Art Deco works of art in their own right.

Eugene Alain Seguy produced eleven albums of illustrations and designs from the turn of the century to the 1930s, and his style reflects the influences of both Art Nouveau and Art Deco. He was interested in butterflies and insects as motifs, and felt they were underutilized subjects and sources of inspiration for art and design. Seguy produced other color portfolios of visual ideas for artists and designers featuring motifs based on the natural world, including flowers, foliage, crystals and animals. Seguy based his images of butterflies and insects on illustrations in scientific publications. Aside from being greatly enlarged, he took pains to make the depictions scientifically accurate. The portfolios are hand-colored and were produced using the pochoir technique -- a printing process which used to be used for high quality art reproductions, which involves using a number of stencils to apply the colors to each plate. Pochoirs are characterized by rich, intense color.

Condition: Generally very good, the colors overall very bright. Usual toning, handling, and slight brittleness of paper. Some minor general soiling, stray printer's ink, smudges. Some formerly with owner stamp lower margin, now removed. Some edges with minor chipping, short tears, bent or creased corners, now restored. Few with marginal losses tipped in.

Reference:
Sear, Dexter. "E.A. Seguy Exhibition: 20 January - 21 March, 2003." Lancaster University Library. 18 February 2003. http://domino.lancs.ac.uk/INFO/LUNews.nsf/I/00001C1E (11 July 2003).



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