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Encyclopedia entry for 'James Taylor Move' LETTER:

Formed in 1967
StylePsychedelic pop
 Original line-up: Robert (R.J.) Taylor (vocals, bass), Kevin Peek (guitar; ex-Hurricanes, Twilights, Johnny Broome and the Handels), Allan Tarney (organ; Johnny Broome and the Handels), Trevor Spencer (drums)

History
The year 1967 will forever be remembered as the `Summer of Love', the year psychedelia rose to prominence around the world. In the UK, Cream, The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Pink Floyd were setting trends in the world of acid-rock. Australia followed suit a little while later with a number of Hendrix-influenced bands such as The Haze, The Trip, The Knack, The Revolution, and the most memorable of the lot, James Taylor Move. The band came together in Adelaide when a sharp discotheque owner decided to assemble a band to capitalise on the new sound of psychedelia.

Two local `name' musicians, Robert Taylor and Trevor Spencer, teamed with Kevin Peek and Allan Tarney who had just returned from trying their luck in the UK with R&B outfit Johnny Broome and the Handels. The Handels had issued one single on the W&G label, `Dos and Don'ts'/`Don't Know Her Name', in 1965 before travelling to the UK. Before that, Peek had been a member of The Hurricanes with John Perry (vocals), Peter Brideoake (rhythm guitar), John Bywaters (bass) and Frank Barnard (drums), plus the nascent Twilights. James Taylor Move supported The Twilights, moved to Melbourne and issued two fascinating psychedelic singles, `And I Heard the Fire Sing'/`Magic Eyes' (August 1967), and `Baby Jane'/`Still I Can Go On' (October) on Festival. The Hendrix-derived `And I Heard the Fire Sing' was too much for local radio of the day, but programmers flipped the single over to reveal the more radio-friendly psychedelic pop of `Magic Eyes', which eventually gave James Taylor Move a southern states hit (#33 in Melbourne).

In May 1968, Kevin Peek left to be replaced by John Pugh (guitar, ex-Roadrunners, Delta Set, Eighteenth Century Quartet, Cam-Pact) and Lance Dixon (organ, sax; ex-Rockwell T. James and the Rhythm Aces). A month later, Taylor also left the band to be replaced by 18-year-old blues belter Wendy Saddington (ex-Revolution). Taylor fronted a series of bands under the names of R.J. Taylor, as well as one called Traine. R.J. Taylor issued a single, `Can't Shoot Your Brother Down'/`Ups and Downs' on the Caesar's International label (June 1970). By the end of 1968 James Taylor Move had dissolved completely. Saddington joined The Chain and Copperwine, Pugh went on to The Avengers, Healing Force, Baiyana, Silversun, Ray Burton and the Nightflyers and the Renée Geyer Band. Lance Dixon joined The Ram Jam Big Band.

Peek, Spencer and Tarney formed The Kevin Peek Trio. The band travelled to the UK and, with the arrival of Terry Britten (guitar; ex-Twilights), became known as Quartet. Quartet recorded two singles for Decca, `Now'/`Will My Lady Come?' (December 1969) and `Joseph'/`Mama Where Did You Fall?' (May 1970). The band also recorded an album which has never seen the light of day. With the break-up of Quartet, Peek became an in-demand session player for the likes of Cliff Richard, Shirley Bassey, Mary Hopkin and Hank Marvin before joining John Williams' enormously successful classical rock band Sky in 1978. Peek issued three solo albums, Guitar Junction (1980), Awakening (1982) and Life and Other Games (1982).

Britten also worked as a session player for the likes of Cliff Richard (for whom he co-wrote `Devil Woman'), Tina Turner and Mike Hugg. In 1977, Britten returned to Australia to write and produce songs for Christie Allen. He later co-wrote two of Tina Turner's biggest hits `What's Love Got to Do with It?' and `We Don't Need Another Hero'. Tarney and Spencer became session players for Olivia Newton-John and The New Seekers. In 1976 they formed The Tarney Spencer Band and issued three albums Tarney Spencer (1976), Three's a Crowd (1978) and Run for Your Life (1979). Tarney wrote several of Cliff Richard's biggest latter-day hits, including `We Don't Talk Anymore' (1977), `Dreamin'' (1980) and `Wired for Sound' (1981), as well as producing his Wired for Sound album and others. In the early 1980s, Tarney formed a songwriting partnership with UK singer Leo Sayer.



Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop / Ian McFarlane 1999
under licence from Allen & Unwin Pty Ltd

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