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History of the National Park Service' features adminstrative histories of many well-known parks, information about former Secretaries of the Interior, Directors of NPS, and Chief Historians in addition to other resources
Online Books features over 300 hard to find and out of print books, park studies, administrative histories, historic resource studies, historic structure reports and National Historic Landmark theme studies.
The NPS thematic framework's eight concepts outline the interdisciplinary concerns for use in evaluating the significance and contexts of historic places and building contextual historic-site interpretive and educational programs. A list of parks categorized by areas of significance is also included here.
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Oral History has information on the National Park Service's oral history programs, and oral history in general

Military: World War II

This is an image of the USS Arizona Memorial

USS Arizona Memorial

The Memorial straddles the sunken hull of the battleship USS Arizona and commemorates the December 7, 1941, Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The Memorial was dedicated in 1962, and became a National Park Service area in 1980.

The USS Arizona is the final resting place for many of the ship's 1,177 crewmen who lost their lives on December 7, 1941. The 184-foot-long Memorial structure spanning the mid-portion of the sunken battleship consists of three main sections: the entry and assembly rooms; a central area designed for ceremonies and general observation; and the shrine room, where the names of those killed on the Arizona are engraved on the marble wall.

The USS Arizona Memorial grew out of wartime desire to establish some sort of memorial at Pearl Harbor to honor those who died in the attack. Suggestions for such a memorial began in 1943, but it wasn't until 1949, when the Territory of Hawaii established the Pacific War Memorial Commission, that the first real steps were taken to bring it about.

Initial recognition came in 1950 when Admiral Arthur Radford, Commander in Chief, Pacific (CINCPAC), ordered that a flagpole be erected over the sunken battleship. On the ninth anniversary of the attack, a commemorative plaque was placed at the base of the flagpole.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who helped achieve Allied victory in Europe during World War II, approved the creation of the Memorial in 1958. Its construction was completed in 1961 with public funds appropriated by Congress and private donations. The Memorial was dedicated in 1962.



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