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Fauvism 

Name given to the painting of Matisse, Derain and their circle from 1905 to about 1910. They were called les fauves - the wild beasts - because of their use of strident colour and apparently wild brushwork. Their subjects were highly simplified so their work was also quite abstract. Fauvism can be seen as an extreme extension of the Post-Impressionism of Van Gogh combined with the Neo-Impressionism of Seurat. Fauvism can also be seen as a form of Expressionism. The name was coined by the critic Louis Vauxcelles when their work was shown for the first time at the Salon d'automne in Paris in 1905. Other members of the group included Braque, Dufy, Rouault, Vlaminck.
 

Henri Matisse, André Derain, 1905
Henri Matisse
André Derain
1905
 
André Derain, The Pool of London, 1906
André Derain
The Pool of London
1906
 
André Derain, Henri Matisse, 1905
André Derain
Henri Matisse
1905
 
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