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Recent Landmarks Designations

 

Recent Landmarks Designations

Each year the King County Landmarks Commission holds public hearings to review nominations of landmark properties to the King County Landmark Registry. The following is a summary of recently designated landmarks.

Foss River Bridge, 1951
Foss River Road Skykomish Vicinity
Designated King County Landmark: 2004

Green River Gorge Bridge, 1915
Green River Gorge Road, Black Diamond Vicinity
Designated King County Landmark: 2004

Judd Creek Bridge, 1953
Vashon Highway, Burton Vicinity
Designated King County Landmark: 2004

Patton Bridge, 1950
Upper Green River Road, Auburn Vicinity
Designated King County Landmark: 2004

Issaquah Depot, 1889
Front Street, Issaquah
Designated City of Issaquah Landmark: 2003

Hailstone Feed Store and Gasoline Station, c1895
Sunset Avenue, Issaquah
Designated City of Issaquah Landmark: 2003

 

 

The Foss River Bridge was built in 1951 over a tributary to the Skykomish River in northeast King County . The bridge is significant for its role in the development of local transportation in the mid-twentieth century, and for its unique structural design, a Warren Pony truss. Commonly used for railroad and road bridge construction from the mid-nineteenth until the mid-twentieth century, the truss design eventually fell out of favor because it was limited to short spans and narrow decks. The Foss River Bridge is the only extant and intact bridge of this type dating from the late period of Warren Pony truss use; three others dating from this era have been significantly altered or moved from their original locations. The Foss River Bridge was designated as a King County Landmark in 2004.

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The Green River Gorge Bridge was constructed in 1915 in southeast King County , and is significant for its association with the development of an early roadway transportation network in rural King County , and as a rare and intact example of Baltimore Petit deck truss structural design. The Green River Gorge Bridge is the only Baltimore Petit deck truss bridge owned and maintained by King County . It was part of an early network of local bridges and road systems developed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and served a crucial role in the earliest highway transportation route from Renton via Maple Valley , through Black Diamond, Franklin , Cumberland , Enumclaw and on to the planned Naches Pass Highway and Mount Rainier . The establishment and expansion of this transportation link occurred due to the growth of local timber and mining activity and expanded recreational opportunities. The Baltimore Petit deck truss is a structural system that evolved during the nineteenth century with the construction of railroad bridges that had to span greater distances. The Green River Gorge Bridge was designated as a King County Landmark in 2004.

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The Judd Creek Bridge was built in 1953 on Vashon Island, and is significant for its association with the development of local transportation systems in the mid-twentieth century, and for its association with noted Washington State bridge engineer and designer, Homer M. Hadley, whose concept for the Lake Washington floating bridge in 1921 is frequently cited as the first of its kind proposed for civic use. The Judd Creek Bridge is also significant as an early example of the concrete hollow-box (box girder) type of bridge construction. Various factors precipitated the expanded use of concrete, including World War II and post-war era steel shortages, and advances in methods of calculating structural loads which simplified the design process and ultimately lead to the construction of large-scale, complex continuous concrete structures. The Judd Creek Bridge is the best-preserved of three extant examples of the earliest concrete box girder bridge design built in King County between the years 1951-53. By the late 1950s, concrete box girder type bridge design was widely used throughout Washington State . The Judd Creek Bridge was designated as a King County Landmark in 2004.

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The Patton Bridge was built in 1950 over the Green River in the vicinity of Auburn , and is significant as a rare and early example of innovative structural design, and for its association with noted Washington State bridge engineer and designer Homer M. Hadley. In 1994 the Patton Bridge was listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Washington State Highway Bridges, 1941-1950 Multiple Property Documentation. The Patton Bridge was designated as a King County Landmark in 2004.

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The Issaquah Depot , originally known as Gilman Station, is a rare, extant example of an early railroad combination passenger and freight station in eastern King County . The Seattle , Lake Shore and Eastern Railway Company constructed the building in 1889. It is significant for its association with the broad theme of transportation and its role in the development of the city of Issaquah and the surrounding Squak Valley . Only two depots of the Seattle , Lake Shore and Eastern railroad line are extant, the Issaquah Depot and the Snoqualmie Depot. The Issaquah Depot is also architecturally significant as a well-preserved example of a small town vernacular depot. Although it was altered during the last century, the City of Issaquah has carefully restored the depot in conformance with accepted preservation standards.

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The Hailstone Feed Store and Gasoline Station in Issaquah is a unique surviving example of a combination feed store and gasoline station in King County . The oldest portion of the current building appears to have been built in the late 19 th century and exhibits a distinctive residential vernacular building form. As early as 1903, it was relocated and adapted for commercial feed store and warehouse uses. In 1942, the building was again relocated and remodeled in order to serve the feed store and gasoline station functions. Located at a prominent site adjacent to the main north-south commercial street in downtown Issaquah, it continued to function for those purposes until ca. 1990. The Hailstone Feed Store and Gasoline Station is significant for its associations with local commerce and the broad patterns of transportation history and the advent of the modern automobile era in King County. It is also significant as an unusually late and rare intact example of the popular “house with canopy” gasoline station building type. It was designated as a City of Issaquah Landmark in 2003.

 

Updated: August 17, 2004


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