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LINDA'S FAMILY HISTORY PAGE
WELCOME TO LINDA'S FAMILY HISTORY PAGE 1
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~      Peter Tondee 1723-1775
    The photo you see is a scanned copy of a geniune likeness of Peter Tondee, my 5th Great Grandfather.  The portrait was a water color medallion and was owned by Mrs. Julia Doty De Puis, Peter Tondee's great-great grand daughter who inherited it from her mother and her mother before her.  The original medallion was damaged by moisture.  

    Peter Tondee's Father
Pierre Tondu born in 1684, in Chatillon-sur-Loire, one year prior to the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, fled France and went to England.  It is believed he settled near Leicester Square, in London.  His son Peter Tondee was born in 1723, in London.
PETER TONDEE , JR.
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I want to thank all who have e-mailed me with inquiries.  I have met new cousins and shared information and also received information, please continue.

The purpose of this site is a personal satisfaction of sharing my family history and hoping to preserve it for future generations.
  
Last updated July 15, 2002.
   
SCROLL DOWN TO SEE:  History on Thomas Mouse and his family and  SOME WELL KNOWN PEOPLE IN THIS FAMILY TREE.   ALSO, some valuable history on PETER TONDEE,JR.  Also my direct line from PIERRE TONDU TO ME (LINDA SNOW DAVIS) this will be finished as time permits.  PLEASE CHECK BACK

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Below is  some brief history on Peter Tondee, Jr. from a narrative I wrote ,  a bit of history on Thomas Mouse, Peter's father-in-law, over 200 surnames connected to me, and some well known people in this family tree.  
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MORE ABOUT PETER TONDEE, JR.
Peter and his brother Charles were placed as orphans with Paul Amatis, and Italian silk maker for a period in 1734 until early 1735, when Amatis expressed his wishes to have the Tondee boys be taken off his hands.  Later, they were placed with Henry Parker, a linen maker and magistrate.  Then, when Reverend George Whitefield came to Savannah with dreams of building the first orphanage, he would seek out the Tondee boys to be a part of that dream.  Peter had learned the carpentry trade and not only helped build the Orphange, Bethesda, but lived there as an orphan.  He was employed by the Colonial Council to build, in 1765 a house to hold the Courts of Province.  Also in 1767, was appointed culler and inspector of lumber for the port of Savannah.
  
Peter had acquired several land grants and between 1766 and 1770 he built his tavern.  Tondee's Tavern, located on the corner of Broughton and Whitaker Streets in Savannah, was the chief rallying place of the town for social as well as business activity for the last decade of the Colonial era.  The Tavern was built at the time of the British tax oppression.  As a result of the Stamp Act, the secret organization, Sons of Liberty, was formed.  Peter felt the weight of the oppression when a tax was levied on him for a slave, thus he was in the secret organization.  Georgia members of the Sons of Liberty turned to the Tavern for the secret meetings.

He continued in carpentry and on the eve of the Revolution in 1773, he was employed by the Council Government on repairs to the Court House windows and drawing a salary as messenger to the Commons House of Assembly.  On July 27, 1774 with the  news of the closing of the port of Boston, the Liberty Boys openly rallied at Tondee's Tavern, intent upon placing the Province of Georgia within the lists of Revolutionists.  At the Tavern, many patriots made speeches among whom was George Walton who was to be immortalized as a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Time passed without further demonstration until January, a meeting was held in the Tavern to prepare a petition to the King for the repeal of the acts of parliment imposing taxes without representation.  At another meeting on January 23, Peter Tondee was one of the 45 Delegates in his tavern who elected delegates to represent Georgia in the Continental Congress.  News of the battle of Lexington reached Savannah May 10, 1775 and the Liberty Boys, rallied again at Tondee's Tavern and formally severed allegiance to England.  At the Tavern the plan was concocted that the Liberty Boys seized from the king's magazine in Savannah five hundred pounds of powder part, which they shipped to Boston, and was used by the patriots there at the battle of Bunker Hill.
On the 5th of June, 1775 the patriots erected the first liberty pole in Georgia in front of Tondee's Tavern and on the 21st summoned the people of Savannah to choose a committee to enforce association with other colonies in the cause of freedom.  After all business transactions, the liberty flag was hoisted upon the liberty pole and several of the gentlemen dined in the Tavern and drank thirteen patriotic toasts.  On the 4th of July, 1775, the sitting of the first Provincial Congress of Georgia took place in the "Long Room" of the Tavern, the occasion of passing measures of importance, framing the bill of rights proclaiming the priviledges for which it was to contend, and the introducing of Georgia into the fold of the confederated provinces were the puposes for this meeting.  It also chose its president, Archibald Bullock.
Peter Tondee's involvement in the Revolution came to an end, as on October 21, 1775 he took ill at his Tavern, growing worse, until he died the next evening.  His wife Lucy Tondee became sole proprietress of the Tavern and continued the service of the liberty.  The Council of Safety resolved to meet at
Tondee's "Long Room" every Monday at 10:00 a.m. and as emergency of affairs arose.  
Tondee's Tavern survived the fires of the British occupation of Savannah and the returned Government resettled itself in her tavern, as the House of Assembly on the 5th of August 1782, resolved to allow her, for the use of the Tavern, monies to be paid out of the first money that would come into the public Treasury.  It occupied the room until 1784 and probably until the year after, when the Tavern ceased to be.  Lucy Tondee died in Savannah in Oct. 1785.  Lucy had also filled her mission serving the cause of the Revolution.

Peter Tondee was known as the Tavern Keeper, Georgia's roster of Revolution records him as " Son of Liberty" and Member of Provincial Congress . He referred to himself as a "carpenter".

THIS HISTORY WAS WRITTEN BY ME AND PUBLISHED IN "THE FIRST FAMILIES OF HENRY COUNTY, GEORGIA, COMPILED BY THE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF HENRY AND CLAYTON COUNTY, GEORGIA, INC. AND WAS EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTUTION BY JOSEPH HENRY HIGHTOWER MOORE AND COPYRIGHTED  IN 1993.






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More on Thomas Mouse, and over 300 surnames in my family tree.
              
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