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NOVEMBER . 19095 aphorism, and all that sort of thing. On this understanding, and with all rights reserved, we gently but firmly bulge in. The matter of chief interest with us is the rabbit's foot which the Austrian Ambassador found in the pocket of Hon. Booker Washington's overcoat. Everybody knows, of course, so it need not be explained at length, that his excellency, Mr. Hengelmuller, and Prof. Booker Washington, head of the famous negro college at Tuskegee, Ala., happened to visit President Roosevelt on the same day and at about the same hour. The Ambassador escaped first and, in the hurry of his craving for fresh air, took Prof. Booker Washington's overcoat in mistake-for his own. As he passed down the asphalt semi-circle, reveling in the peace and the serenity of the surroundings, he reached for a pair of gloves and, after dragging the deep Charybdis of the pocket, rose to the surface with a rabbit's foot. No gloves—just the left hind foot of a graveyard rabbit, killed in the dark of the moon. Evidently the overcoat was not his. There had been a mistake. The garment was fine, expensive, fashionable, as became a wearer who moved in the very highest and most exclusive circles. It dist~lled the unmistakable aroma of the select. It fairly smelled of aristocracy. Nevertheless, it clid not belong to Mr. Hengelmuller, so he turned back to the White House, made the exchange, got his own clothes, and heroically relinquished the rabbit's foot. The episode has terminated without international heartburnings or forebodings. The Austrian Ambassador recovers his overcoat and gloves, while the Hon. Booker Washington does not know—at least, until this moment—that he was ever in danger of losing his rabbit's foot.t All's well that ends well. The cloud has passed, and the orb of glory follows its bright nathwaY unobscured bY envy and contention. v ~ Washington Post, Nov. ~ 3, 1909, 6. ~ The rabbit's foot may have been an invention of the Post reporter, for some other newspaper accounts did not mention it. The Detroit Journal commented: ''The Austrian ambassador may have made off with Booker T. Washington's coat at the White House, but he'd have a bad time trying to fill his shoes.'' (Nov. ~4, egos, Clipping, Con. Boy, BEVY Papers, DLC.) 437