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Correspondence Relating to the Fourth U.S. Infantry, Operations on the Pacific, 1861

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Numbers 3.

Report of Lieutenant Joseph B. Collins, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

CAMP NEAR THE HEAD OF LARRABEE CREEK, May 9, 1861.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with instructions from department headquarters dated March 6, 1861, I have the honor to submit the following report:

Since my report of the 19th ultimo I have attacked two ranches and killed fifteen Indians. The entire country is mountainous, well timbered, watered, and furnishes sufficient grass all the year for large herds of beef-cattle and horses; indeed, it is one of the finest mountain grazing countries I have ever seen. I cannot at this time report correctly upon the number of inhabitants, through they are considerable, at least enough to expect protection, and are located over a country of more than fifty miles. In consequence of the serious depredations of the Indians many of the inhabitants have deserted their homes, and been compelled to drive their cattle to the more thickly settled portions of the country, thogh since some of the Indians have been chastised they are returning and feel more secure in their persons, and property. The best position for a post is, in my opinion, on Eel River, near the head of Larrabee Creek, about sixty-five miles southeast from Fort Humboldt. It should be built immediately, and garrisoned by at least one full company, with a sufficient number of mules and riding saddles to mount a party large enough (say thirty) to follow rapidly and chastise all Indians that may commit depredations within fifty miles of it. This I believe will soon put a stop to all depredations and give ample security to the inhabitants and their property. Without a post but little can be accomplished and proper protection is almost impossible. The roads will be good for pack animslas during the dry season, and the facilities for building good; that is, for small dry houses. The Indians are always informed that they are punished for committing depredations on the citizens and their property, and that they will be followed and severely chastised until they desist and give some reliable pledge of permitting them to remain and follow their avocations umolested. As I have no means of subsisting the women and children found in the different ranchers, of course they are not detained as prisoners, and lose no time in informing other hostile Indians of my acts. This gives many ranchers an opportunity of escaping for the time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. B. COLLINS,

First Lieutenant, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Detachment.

Captain CHARLES S. LOVELL,

Commanding Forth Humbold, Colonel

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Report of Lieutenant Joseph B. Collins, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

CAMP AT NEIL'S RANCH,

Van Dusen's Creek, April 15, 1861.

CAPTAIN: Private Casey, of your company, was badly wounded this morning in an engagement with the Indians near Mad River, about twenty miles from here. He was shot with an arrow about two inches below the right shoulder-blade and near the backbone. I pulled the arrow out, but the stone head was so deeply imbedded that it beroke short off, and of course yet remains in him. He was carried from the ranch, where the fight took place, to where he now is, on a litter, compalining of suffering much pain, and is really so bad that I could not move him here. Will you please send medical attendance for him. I had a fight with the Indians yesterday not far from where I again attacked them this morning, and killed between 15 and 20; to-day 5 were killed and 3 wounded. The Indians are very troublesome and almost constantly killing stock. I will report more fully the first opportusnity.

Very respectfully, and in haste, your obedient servant,

JOS. B. COLLINS,

First Lieutenant, Fourth Infty., Commanding Detach. Co. B, Sixth U. S. Infty.

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CAMP ON LARRABEE'S CREEK, CAL., June 18, 1861.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report, embracing my operations against hostile Indians since May 9, 1861, on Mad and Eel Rivers and their tributaries:

May 23, attaked an Indian rancheria between the head of Larrabee's Creek and Main Eel River, and killed 10 of their number. May 26, attacked rancheria about twelves miles from and farther up the river than the one attacked on the 23rd instant, and killed 4 Indians. May 30, attacked a very large rancheria near Keatuck Creek; killed 25 Indians and wounded 10. At this place the Indians fought with more determination than upon any former occasion. Packer John Steward  was shot through the middle finger with an arrow, which fortunately struck the stock of his rifle, preventing a serious if not fatal wound. Twelve bows and quivers with a large number of arrows were taken from this rancheria. June 2, attacked a rancheria about five miles from Larrabee's house; killed 20 Indians. June 8, attacked a rancheria about three miles south of Larrabee's house; killed 4 and wounded 1. June 16, attacked a rancheria near Kettenshaw Valley; killed 4 Indians. Corporal Larrabee, of the volunteers, wounded in the left arm by an arrow. This rancheria was occupied by Las-sic's band, probably the most desperate and troublesome Indians in the mountains. They have frequently been engaged in murdering whites, burning houses, and killing horses and cattle. I regret so few of them were killed, but they were constantly on the alert and could only be caught by following them day and night, the troops carrying their provisions and blankets on their backs. The attack was made near noon, and as the Indians were prepared for it, many of them escaped through the almost impassable bushes. June 17, attacked a rancheria on the trail leading from from Kettenshaw to Round Valley; killed 6 Indians, only 1 escaped. In this rancheria there was found over 200 pounds of pork; hogs recently killed by the Indians. The number of Indians reported killed and wounded in the several engagements were, of course, all males, competent to bear arms. Percussion caps, bullets, and parts of five-arms have been found in their possession. The Indians in the vicinity of every neighborhood between Mad and Eel Rivers, where depredations have been committed for the last four or five months, have been severely chastised, and nearly all of them driven from the settlements. In no instance have Indians been punished who were supposed to be innocent. The volunteers have rendered very efficient service in the manner in which they are associated with the regular troops, and their retention until the expiration of their term of service is important and judicious. No troops could have done better than the detachment from your company, and I take great pleasure in saying that both regulars and volunteers, cheerfully and without a murmur, bore the fatigues, night marches, and deprivations incident to pursuing, finding, and chastising hostile Indians. But little more remains to be done by the present command; probably it will be sufficient after the term of service of the volunteers expires, July 17, to remain where we now are and keep all Indians from the settlements. In my opinion the establishment of a military post is the only mode of affording reliable security to the citizens and their property.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. B. COLLINS,

First Lieutenant, Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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Numbers 1.

Report of Major W. Scott Ketchum, Fourth U. S. Infantry.


HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernanrdino, Cal., October 7, 1861.

SIR: The attention of the general commanding the department is respectfully called to such portions of the inclosed report as embrace the names of Morgan, Grooms, Greenwade, and Cline, secessionists, Cable, a Union man; also that portion relating to jack hays. Morgan, at Temecula, Knight of the Golden Circle, and secessionists, states that eight men were detailed from an organization of 300 men to seize the arms sent to Los Angeles for the Union men, or home guards, but some of the men backed out, consequently the arms were not siezed. Had the arms been seized my camp was to have been attacked. Ferguson, said to be a lieutenant in Kelly's band, gave Morgan this information. This confirms the report made to me by the Union men prior to the election. I understand that a law has been passed to prevent conspiracies and to punish conspirators, but I have received nothing of the kind, or, in fact, anything official from the War Department since General Orders, Numbers 43, of this year, or any general order from Army Headquarters since General Orders, Numbers 11, 1861. I judge from the map inclosed that Cable's, or its vicinity, would be a good station for troops tolook after and capture secessionists, if accompanied by a U. S. marshal and some authority for the capture. There should be a large command of foot and horsemen somehwere between the desert and this place with full powers to act. Supplies could be furnished from New San Diego, which should have a sufficient force to escort the trains, containing supplies, defend the depot, and operate toward Lower California. I have been told that there is a wagon road from Temecula, via San Luis Rey, to San Diego; distance about sixty-five or seventy miles. There is another wagon road from san Diego to Warner's ranch, distance about the same as above, but as it crosses the San Pasqual Mountain, it is difficult to travel in wet weather. The San Pasqual Mountain is very high, and the road on the west side very narrow, very steep, and much washed or full of gullies. From what I can learn, the road between Temecula and San Diego is much better than the other.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

 

ORDERS,
HEADQUARTERS, Numbers 5.
Fort Dalles, Oreg., February 9, 1861.

I. Captain Whitlesey, First Dragoons, with twenty- nine men of his company, mounted andequipped for the field, will cross the Columbia River at Dalles City and proceesd without delay to Big Island and adjacent cutnry, for th purpose of finding and chastising the Indians who have recently stolen horses, mules, and other proprty from the whites on the Umatilla River, wWillow and Butter Creeks. Should any proprty be recovered from the Indians, it will be restored to owners, as far as practicable, or brought to this post. Captain Whittlesey will take with himtwelve days' rations for his command, and not less than sixty rounds of ammunition per man.

II. The quartmasters' deaprtmane will furnish twelve mules, equipped for packing, and employone guide and five packers to accompany Captain Whittleseay.

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS,
San Bernandino, Cal., August 26, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Pacific Department, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Companies D and G reached this place yesterday. Companies A and F encamped at the Old Mission, about twenty-five miles from New San Pedro, on the 24the instantnt, and should reach this place on the 28th instant, if nothing happens to prevent. There are no vacant buildings to be rented for either or sodliers in this town. This command is very much in want of a physician, as well as company officer. Please furnish both as soon as practicable.

Respctfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT, KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernandino, Cal., August 30, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: From information this day received I have thought it advisable to order the two companies of dragoons from Los Angeles to this place. Although authorized to withdraz more, if necessary, I am in hopes that the mounted troops will suffice. I have been informed that the secessionists contemplated attacking my command while in route to this place, but as we were here much sooner than expected the secessionists were not prepared. I have also been notified that in secret meetings it has been determined to attack my camp on or before Wednesday next, but I hope nothing of the kind will happen. If General Sumner has any instructions to give me please send them by telegraph without delay.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETHCUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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FORT TER. WAW, CAL., August 31, 1861.

Major RICHARD C. DRUM,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal:

MAJOR: In accordance with the direction of the general commanding, I have the honor to report my arrival at this post on the 28th unltimo [instant], and its occupation by Company C, Fourth Infantry. I found upon my arrival at Crescent City that the stock of barley (11,000 pounds) left by Lieutenant Turner in charge of Mr. Snider had been sold and transported to Crescent city; also two wagons. I have re-purchased one of the wagons and contracted for a supply of grain to be delivered here (10,000 pounds). I found nothing worth taking up on my returns of the property left by Lieutenant Turner except two stoves and two pairs of andirouns and a whale-boat, with will serve our purposes for a time. apart from the item of transportation ($25 to $30 per ton from Crescent City), this post is not an expensive tone to keep up. Half the forage allowance will be sufficient, and fine beef-cattle can be purchased on the hoof from responsible parties for 5 cents or less. The Indian population are quiet and well disposed. Mr. Snider found no difficulty, I believe, in preserving and turning over to me in good order the buildings, garden, &c. There are no post records left behind.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

L. C. HUNT,

Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,
San Francisco, September 2, 1861.

Major WILLIAM S. KETCHUM,

Fourth Infantry, Commanding at San Bernardino, Cal.:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to inform you that necessity has compelled the withdrawal of two companies of infantry at Los Angeles for service at Fort Yuma. The squadron of dragoons still at that point will, the general hopes, enable you to sustain the authority of the Government and protect the public property.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 2, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Captain Davidson's command of dragoons reached this place this day. In my opinion circumstances require that I should detain him at this place until after the election, when, unless disappointed in my expectations, he can carry out such instructions as he may have received from department headquarters. I am much in want of a good physician, company officers, and recruits.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Fort Dalles, Oreg., February 9, 1861.

Captain JOSEPH H. WHITTLESEY,

First Dragoons:

SIR; In additin to the requirements oft the order herewith,* you will co- operate with any troops sent form Fort Walla Walla on the same service, and if necessary communicate with the commanding officer at Fort Walla Walla and these headquarters by means of expresses. You will take every precaution to guard against surprise ort h loss of the proprty in your charge, and endeavor to accomplish the object for which you are dispatched, thoroughly and as speedily as practicable. The accompanying letter from Mr. C. M. Grover will make known to you where the depredations were committed and the prbable location of the Indian depredators. + After completing your search for the hostile Indians on the north side of the Columbia River, it will be well to cross the river anscout in the vicinity of the settlements on Willow and Butter Creeks before returning to this post. I understand that the Indian agent has applied to the commanding officer at Fort Walla Walla to send troops to the Umatilla country. The deparedators are said to be renegades from the Snake, Yakima, Cayuise, Columbia River, and Wallaa Walla Indians, who acknowledge no chief and claim the entire country as their own.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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FORT GASTON, CAL., April 28, 1861.

Major W. W. MACKALL, U. S. Army,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that in compliance with instructions received from your office, dated March 25, 1861, I have this day ordered a detachment, consisting of two non-commissioned officers and twenty-seven privates of Company B, Fourth Infantry, and eight volunteer guides, to proceed from this post to Pardee's old ranch via the South Fork of the Trinity River. From that place the sergeant commanding the detachment has instructions to marvh in any direction (keeping the general's letter of instructions in view) his guides may suggest I have also given him instructions that in case depredations are committed in the section of country through which he marches with his command to take prompt measures to pursue and capture the depredators; and if the fact of their guilt can be clearly ascertained to punish the whole  tribe, without the guilty ones are surrendered. The volunteer guides, one corporal and seven privates, did not reach this post until the 26th instant. Many of them were destitute of clothing, and in order to equip them for duty in the field I have been compelled to issue to them a small quantity of clothing. In consideration of the great excitement amongst Indians which has existed consequent upon the surrender of their arms (the fact was fully reported to department headquarters in my letter dated April 20, 1861), I did not consider myself justified in sending a larger force form this post at present, and I have now but thirty-four enlisted men left at this post. Considering the numerical strength of the Indians in this valley, to press any desirable result in case of an outbreak I would require my whole command.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. UNDERWOOD,

Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

P. S. - One the same day that the detachment left this post I forwarded a report of the same to Captain Lovell, Sixth Infantry, commanding Fort Humboldt, informing him that they had left. I also furnished the captain a copy of my letter of instructions to the sergeant in command of the detachment.

E. U.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH INFANTRY,
Fort Dalles, Oreg., May 29, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The present would seem to be not an inappropriate time to invite the attention of the commanding general of the department to the very scattered positions of the Fourth Infantry and to respectfully request him, if not incompatible with the general interests of the service, to make such changes therein as will bring them more immediately under the supervision of the regimental commander. The regiment now occupies almost the entire length and no inconsiderable portion of the breadth of the Department of the Pacific, the companies being garrisoned at ten different posts and the commander with his headquarters at a post without even one of those companies with him. This post is the proper station of Major R. S. Garnett, Ninth Infantry, who is reported on the monthly return as "absent without leave," and who was assigned to it in August, 1859, and is supposed to be on his return to it at this time. Could the companies of the Fourth Infantry now serving in Oregon and at the Cascades be transferred to Puget Sound and those of the Ninth on the Sound be transferred to Oregon, I think it would be beneficial to the interests of the service and would give each regiment a more direct interest in the section in which it would be serving. Should it not be deemed advisable, however, to make this arrangement, it would gratify me to have my headquarters changed to a more central position with regard to the stations of the regiment, or to have one of the detached companies ordered to this post.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN,

Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel and Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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FORT DALLES, OREG., May 30, 1861.

ACTG. ASST. ADJT. General, DISTRICT OF OREGON,

Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Special Orders, Numbers 6, of the District of Oregon, and to report that in the present condition of this command I shall feel compelled to detain Captain Black's company until after the arrival of the other from Fort Walla Walla, which will be about the middle of next week, I presume, unless Colonel Wright should forbid my doing so by the Monday's mail. The dragoon company having a detachment of twenty men at Warm Springs is too weak to furnish the necessary guard for the protection of the public property and post and attend also to the care of its horses.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN,

Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,
San Francisco, May 30, 1861.

Bvt. Major G. O. HALLER,

Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding San Diego, Cal.:

SIR: Orders have been given for sending to you two 24-pounder guns, and the department commander directs that you place them judiciously in battery so as to control as much as possible the harbor at San Diego and at the same time strengthen your position. They will reach you probably on the 3rd proximo.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Numbers 9.
Fort Vencouver, Wash. Ter., June 11, 1861.

I. Fort Cascades will be adandoned forthwith, and the public property of every description turned over to the proper departments at Fort Vancouver. Major Babbitt and Lieutenant Mason will send their agents to the Cascedes by the steamer to-morrow to received the quatermaster's and commissary property from Captain Wallen. Captain Wallen after turning over his pulic property will proceed with the greatest dispatch and embark his company on the steamer Cortez, now at Portland, and comply with his previous orders.

II. Company I, Ninth Infantry, under orders for Fort Walla Walla, will continue its march to Fort Dalles, descending the Columbia River by water. Company E, Ninth Infantry, under orders for Fort Dalles, will continue its march without delay to Fort Vancouver, where its commander will receive further orders.

III. Captain Dent, Ninth Infantry, with his company (B), under orders for Fort Cascades, will continue his march to Fort Hiskins and relieve Captain Agur, Fourth Infantry, in command of that post. Captain Augur will then proceed without delay with his company to Potland and embark on the first steamer for San Francisco, where he will report to the department commander.

IV. Fort Yamhill will be adandoned. Th chiefs of the staff departments at these headquarters will take immediate measures to receive and secure the public property. Captain Russell, Foruth Infantry, with his company (K) will move promptly to Portland, and embark on the first steamer for San Francisco, where he will report to the department commander.

V. Camp Pickett, on San Juan Island, and Fort Townsend will be abandoned and the publict property sent to Fort Steilacoom. Captain Pickett, with Company D, Ninth Infantry, and Captain Hunt, with Company C, Fourth Infantry, will embrak on the firsyt steamer for San Fransicso. Major Ketchum, Foruth Infantry, will proceed with this command, and on his arrival at San Francisco report to the department commander.

VI. Camp Chehalis will be abandoned. The public property that cannot be removed, together with the buildings, will be placed in charge of a responsible agent. The company at Camp Chehalis (A, Fourth Infantry), will then move promptly to the mouth of the Columbia River and embrak on theor San Francisco, where the commander will report to the department commander.

VII. The assistant quartermaster at Fort Steilcaoom will employ the Massachusetts in removing the pulic property from the posts abandoned on the sound, and place the buildings in charge of responsible agents.

VIII. The officers of the medical department at Fort Yamhill, Cascades, and Townsedn, and Camps Pickett and Chehalis, will accompnay their respective commands.

IX. The officers of the quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation to insure a prompt execution of the movements herein ordered.

By order of Colonel Wriht:

JNO S. MASON,
First Lieutenant, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

 

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FORT CASCADES, WASH, TER., June 14, 1861.

Major D. C. BUELL,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have this day abandoned this post, by instructions received from th headquarters District of Oregon, dated Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 11, 1861. The public property was all duty turned over to the proper departments at Fort Vancouver. Inclosed is the post return to date.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. D. WALLEN,

Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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CAMP SUMNER, July 4, 1861.

Captain R. C. DRUM,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Department of the Pacific:

CAPTAIN: There are many rumors in circulation about the movement of troops. If Camp Sumner is to be continued, and it is compatible with the public service, I shall be glad to be retained in command of the camp. This application is only made under the supposition that the major commanding may be sent upon other duty.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. D. WALLEN,

Captain, Fourth Infantry.

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By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.


HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,

San Francisco, August 14, 1861

Major WILLIAM S. KETCHUM,

Fourth Regiment of Infantry, Camp Samner, Cal.:

MAJOR: It is reported from authentic sources that there is much disaffection toward the Government in the southern part of this State, and the object of placing you with your command at San Bernardino is to repress with a strong hand any organization to resist or impede the measures of the Government. You will consider yourself charged with all the supervision of Los Angeles, San Bernadino, San Diego, and Santa Barbara Counties, and you will endeaveo to keep yourself well informed of all scheming against the Governement, and interpose at once if any overt act of treason is committed. You will have authority to concentrate the troops from Los Angeles, San Bernandino, and San Diego, if any emergency should make it necessary. Communicate with Colonel Andrews, at Fort Yuma, and if that post should be threatened by any histile movement from Texas or Arizona, march instantly to its supporst with your whole available force.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 8, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Captain Davidson returned to this place yesterday with his entire command, and leaving Company F, Fourth Infantry, here, proceeded to Los Angeles, without visiting Bear and Holcomb Valleys. As I was not advised by department headquarters of the nature of the instructions under which Captain Davidson acted, I cannot of course say whether he carried them out or not. Captain Davidson left my camp with his dragoons and Company F, Fourth Infantry, on the 5th instant with six days' provisions, and, much to my surprise, returned on the 7th instant, on which latter-mentioned date, I have been informed, some disguised persons fired upon a party en route to the mines in Santa Ana Canon, killing one man named Stemper, and wounding another named Bogan. A man by the name of Green, a clerk for Sylvester, at Holcomb Valley, and another man named John Fuller, an expressman, are reported as missing. I have been told that Stemper had $1,300 or more in gold dust about his person. The horse of the expressman, Mr. Mogo, of Holcomb Valley, says, has been seen, but Fuller and Green have not yet been heard of. Mr. Mogo is also of the opinion that had Captain Davidson proceeded on to Holcomb Valley he would not have been far from the place where the party was attacked. The depredation is represented to have been committed between 9 and 10 a. m. on the 7th instant between Deer Creek and Trip's Station, about five miles this side of Deer Creek and seven miles the other side of Trip's. As Captain Davidson started for Bear and Holcomb Valleys, I regret that he did not visit them, as his party was 125 strong. The mere show of such a force in such places would, in my opinion, have had a beneficial effect.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC,
San Francisco, September 9, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army,

Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: The Governor of California has given the following appointments to officers of the Army, and as their services will be of the utmost importance in the volunteers, I would respectfully ask the sanction of the General-in-Chief: Major A. J. Smith, First U. S. Cavalry, to be colonel of the Second Regiment of Cavalry; H. M. Judah, Fourth Infantry, to be colonel Second Regiment of Infantry; First Lieutenant Benjamin F. Davis, First U. S. Cavalry, to be lieutenant-colonel (Battalion) First Regiment Cavalry; First Lieutenant John Kellogg, Third Artillery, to be lieutenant-colonel --- Regiment of Infantry; Second Lieutenant E. V. Sumner, Jr., First U. S. Cavalry, to be major Second Regiment of Cavalry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

P. S. -Bvt. Major J. H. Carleton, First Cavalry, was appointed colonel at the request of the Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 10, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: On the 8th instant I informed you what reports had been made to me respecting a party which was attacked while en route to the mines in Holcomb Valley. Mr. Stemper, who was reported killed, was wounded; jumped off his horse and fired four times at his assailants, two in number, who ran off and left him. Mr. Stemper was shot in the thigh through the flesh, and the ball lodged in his wallet in his trousers' pocket, which saved his life undoubtedly. Mr. Bogan was shot in the shoulder. He is now in San Bernardino and will no doubt recover, as his is a flesh wound only. Mr. Fuller, the expressman, is safe. He jumped off his horse and ran. He thinks those who attacked him secure his horse. Of this however, he has no acknowledge. Fuller, who returned to San Bernardino, says he saw nine persons in the attacking party, and he thinks there were more from the noises heard by him. Mr. Green, the clerk, is also safe, and is now in Holcomb Valley. He reports that he fought his way through to Deer Creek Station; hence nobody was killed and only two wounded. Constable Saint John took a posse and went in search of the depredators, so I have been informed, but he has not made any arrests yet, although he suspects who were concerned.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 16, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Company E, Ninth Infantry, also Company K, Fourth Infantry, and a portion of Company H, Fourth Infantry, joined my command this day from Camp Sumner, Cal., in obedience to instructions from department headquarters. Aggregate, 120. Having received no blanks, I cannot furnish a field return. For the present my command at this place will be kept entire for the purpose of instructions and discipline. My command is sadly in want of company officers.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

 

SPECIAL ORDERS,
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, No. 180.
San Francisco, September 25, 1861.

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2. The counties of San Luis Obispo, Buena Vista, Tulare, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and San Diego, in the southern part of the State of California, will constitute a command within this department to be known as the District of Southern California, headquarters at Los Angeles. Colonel George Wright, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, is assigned to the command of the district.

3. The headquarters of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry will be stationed at San Bernardino, to which point Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan, major Fourth Infantry, with the regimental staff and band will proceed.

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By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,
HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Numbers 5.
Los Angeles, October 14, 1861.

I. Colonel Carleton will order three companies of volunteer cavalry to march immediately to San Bernardino to relieve the regular troops at that place. As soon as relieved the regular troops under Major Ketchum will march to San Pedro.

II. The headquarters of the Fourth Infantry are transferred to San Pedro. Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan will proceed immediately with the staff, band, and Company H, Fourth Infantry, to San Pedro, where he will establish a camp and await the arrival of the troops from San Bernardo in numbers.  The command at San Pedro will be independent of that of the District of Southern California.

G. WRIGHT,

Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS,
Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 10, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army,

Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: On the 8th instant I informed you what reports had been made to me respecting a party which was attacked while en route to the mines in Holcomb Valley. Mr. Stemper, who was reported killed, was wounded; jumped off his horse and fired four times at his assailants, two in number, who ran off and left him. Mr. Stemper was shot in the thigh through the flesh, and the ball lodged in his wallet in his trousers' pocket, which saved his life undoubtedly. Mr. Bogan was shot in the shoulder. He is now in San Bernardino and will no doubt recover, as his is a flesh wound only. Mr. Fuller, the expressman, is safe. He jumped off his horse and ran. He thinks those who attacked him secure his horse. Of this however, he has no acknowledge. Fuller, who returned to San Bernardino, says he saw nine persons in the attacking party, and he thinks there were more from the noises heard by him. Mr. Green, the clerk, is also safe, and is now in Holcomb Valley. He reports that he fought his way through to Deer Creek Station; hence nobody was killed and only two wounded. Constable Saint John took a posse and went in search of the depredators, so I have been informed, but he has not made any arrests yet, although he suspects who were concerned.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM,

Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, No. 180.
San Francisco, September 25, 1861.

2. The counties of San Luis Obispo, Buena Vista, Tulare, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and San Diego, in the southern part of the State of California, will constitute a command within this department to be known as the District of Southern California, headquarters at Los Angeles. Colonel George Wright, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, is assigned to the command of the district.

3. The headquarters of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry will be stationed at San Bernardino, to which point Bvt. Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan, major Fourth Infantry, with the regimental staff and band will proceed.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

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[Inclosure No. 2.] SPECIAL ORDERS,
HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, No. 2.
Los Angeles, October 7, 1861.

I. Colonel James H. Carleton, of the First Regiment California Volunteers, will march as soon as practicable with his entire regiment to Warner's ranch and establish a camp at that place of four companies, under the command of a field officer. Colonel Carleton will then move with the residue of his regiment to Fort Yuma and relieve the garrison of regular troops at that place.

III. Until further orders the headquarters of the Fourth Infantry, with Company H, of that regiment, will be established in this city. The acting quartermaster will furnish quarters for the officers and men.

G. WRIGHT,

Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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