An Explanation of the Superintendent of Documents Classification System

Depository Administration Branch
Library Division
Library Programs Service
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, DC 20401


Table of Contents

Table II

Table III

Table IV

[Cover and front matter]

[Note accompanying the HTML version]

[SuDoc Number]


The Superintendent of Documents Classification System

Introduction

The Superintendent of Documents classification system was developed in the Library of the Government Printing Office between 1895 and 1903. It was first described in October 1903 by William Leander Post, then in charge of the Library, in the preface to List of Publications of the Agriculture Department, 1862-1902, Department List No. 1, issued by the Superintendent of Documents in 1904.

Mr. Post gives credit for the foundation of the system (classification by governmental author) to Miss Adelaide R. Hasse, who used government organization authorship to assign classification numbers to a List of Publications of the U.S. Department of Agriculture from 1841 to June 30, 1895. Miss Hasse prepared the list while assistant librarian in the Los Angeles Public Library. It was published by the Department of Agriculture in 1896 as its Library Bulletin No. 9.

This system has expanded as the Federal Government has grown. Though still retaining the principles upon which it is based, it has changed in some details and methods of use.

Because the classification system is based on the current organizational status of the government author, it changes as the organizational structure of the federal government changes. Thus, publications of some issuing agencies may be located in as many as three different places in the system.

Despite this functional weakness, it has stood the test of time as a workable arrangement for uniquely identifying publications issued by the United States Government. The Superintendent of Documents classification system has been used for over 90 years to identify public documents which were distributed to depository libraries and described in the Monthly Catalog of U.S. Government Publications . The system is also used to arrange the documents collections in most depository libraries as well as in the documents collection of the National Archives.

Foreword

This brief explanation of the classification system used by staff of the Library Programs Service was originally prepared to answer frequent inquiries, and to provide an overview in training new personnel.

The original 1963 edition was prepared by the late Mr. Joseph A. King. The slightly revised 1979 edition was prepared by Mr. Norman N. Barbee, Administrative Librarian, witht the assistance of Mrs. Mae S. Collins, Chief of the Library Division. This current revision was reviewed and enlarged by the staff of the Library Programs Service, especially those within the Acquisitions and Classification Section, Depository Administration Branch.

It is hoped that this explanation will also provide a helpful guide for depository libraries which use the Superintendent of Documents (SuDocs) classification system, as well as for other libraries and persons interested in, or concerned with, classification numbers assigned to publications by the Library Programs Service.

For more detail, users should consult the GPO Classification Manual: A Practical Guide to the Superintendent of Documents Classification System (GP 3.29:P 88).[, and the Federal Depository Library Manual (GP 3.29:D 44/993).] Questions concerning this publication or the SuDocs system in general should be mailed to the following address:

Principles of the System

The Superintendent of Documents (SuDocs) classification system is designed to group together publications by the same government author. Within an agency or department, publications are grouped according to the subordinate organization. The purpose of this system is to uniquely identify, logically relate, and physically arrange each publication so that all publications of a single agency or department may be found together.

Author Symbols

Each executive department and agency, the judiciary, Congress, and other major independent establishments are assigned a unique alphabetical identifier, based on the name of the organization, e.g.,"A" for Agriculture Department,"JU" for Judiciary, and "NS" for National Science Foundation. However, the letters "X" and "Y" are reserved for Congress. The designation "Z" is not used.

Subordinate Offices

To distinguish the subordinate bureaus and offices, numbers are added to the alphabetic identifiers with "1" designating the parent organization, and the secretary's or administrator's office. Beginning with "2", the numbers are applied in numerical order to the subordinate bureaus and offices. These numbers were assigned to bureaus and offices arranged alphabetically when the system was established, and newer subordinate bureaus or offices have been given the next highest number. A period follows the combination of letters and numbers representing the bureau or office.

For example:

Series Designations

The SuDocs classification system also identifies the various series of publications issued by a particular bureau or office. A number is assigned to each series and this number is followed by a colon.

Initially, the following numbers were assigned for the types of publications common to most Government offices:

In establishing classes for new agencies or bureaus, these numbers were reserved for those types of publications. Later new types common to most offices evolved and the following additional numbers were set aside in the classes of new agencies for particular types of series:

Any additional series issued by an office are given the next highest number in order of issuance, i.e., as an office begins publication of a series the next highest number not already assigned to a series is assigned tot he new series of that particular office.

Related Series

New series which are closely related to already existing series are "attached" to the existing series so as to file side by side on the shelf. The relationship is provided by use of the slash mark (/) after the number assigned to the existing series, followed by a digit for each related series starting with "2". (The "1" is not generally used in this connection since the existing series is the first.) Separates are distinguished by use of a letter beginning with "A" rather than by numbers.

A theoretical example of these "attached" classes is as follows:

Class Stem

Combining the designations for authors and those for the series published by the authors results in the class stems for the various series of publications issued by the United States Government.

For example:

The List of Classes contains class stems only.

Book Numbers

The List of Classes does not include book numbers. The following explanation summarizes the construction of the complete number assigned to individual documents.

A unique alpha-numeric identifier follows the colon of the class stem. For numbered series, the original edition of a publication is classed with the series number of the book. For example, Department of Agriculture Home and Garden Bulletin number 86 would be classified as A 1.77:86. For revisions of numbered publications, the slash and date are added, as: A 1.77:86/993 , A 1.77:86/994 , etc.

In the case of annuals, the last three digits of the year are used for the book number, e.g.,Annual Report of Secretary of Agriculture , A 1.1:994 . For reports or publications covering more than one year, a combination of the dates is used, e.g.,Annual Register of the U.S. Naval Academy, 1993-1994 is D 208.107:993-94.

Unnumbered publications are assigned a number based on the principal subject word of the title, using C.A. Cutter's Two-Figure Author Table . An example is Radioactive Heating of Vehicles Entering the Earth's Atmosphere ,NAS 1.2:R 11 ,"Radioactive" being the key subject word and the Cutter designation being R 11.

Another publication,Measurements of Radiation from Flow Fields of Bodies Flying Speeds up to 13.4 Kilometers per Second issued by the same agency, falling in the same series class (NAS 1.2:), and having the same Cutter number for the principal subject word, is individualized by adding the slash and the superior number 2, as NAS 1.2:R 11/2. Subsequent different publications in the subject group which take the same Cutter designation would be identified as R 11/3, R 11/4, etc.

C.A. Cutter's Three-Figure Author Table is used for the purpose of providing for finer distinctions in class between publications whose principal subject words begin with the same syllable.

Revisions of numbered and unnumbered publications are identified by addition of the slash and the last three digits of the year of revision. For example, if the publication Radioactive Heating of Vehicles Entering the Earth's Atmosphere was revised in 1994, the complete classification would read: NAS 1.2:R 11/994. Subsequent revisions in the same year would be identified as 994-2, 994-3, etc.

Periodicals and other serials are identified by number, or volume and number as the case may be. Volume and number are separated by use of the slash. Some examples are:

Unnumbered periodicals and continuations are identified by the year of issuance and order of issuance throughout the year. The last three digits of the year are used, and a number corresponding to the order of issuance within the year is added, the two being separated by the slash. An example is:

Special Treatment of Publications of Certain Authors

While the foregoing principles and rules govern the classification of the publications and documents of most Government authors, special treatments are employed for those of certain Government agencies. These consist of classes assigned to:

  1. Boards, Commissions, and Committees established by Act of Congress or under authority of an Act of Congress, not specifically designated in the Executive Branch of the Government or as completely independent agencies;

  2. Congress and its workin g committees;

  3. Publications of the President and the Executive Office of the President including committees and commissions established by Executive Order and reporting directly to the President.

Boards, Commissions, and Committees

Those agencies established by Act of Congress or under authority of an Act of Congress, not specifically designated in the Executive Branch of the Government, nor as completely independent agencies, are grouped under Y 3 , which is reserved for all such agencies. The individual agency designation follows the period, instead of the series designation. This agency designation is the author number from C.A. Cutter's Two-Figure Author Table for the first main word of the agency name, followed by the colon. Thus the agency designation for Consumer Product Safety Commission is Y 3.C 76/3:and that of Selective Service System is Y 3.Se 4:. The slash and numbers are used to distinguish between author designations of agencies having the same or similar first principal word in their names as Y 3.F 31/8: for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and Y 3.F 31/15: for Federal names as Y 3.F 31/8: for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and Y 3.F 31/15: for Council on Aging.

Series designations for publications of these agencies then follow the colon instead of preceding it. These series designations are assigned in the regular way.

The unique identifiers are then added to the series designations with no separation if the individual book numbers begin with letters, and are separated by the slash if they begin with numbers. Thus the Annual Report of the Consumer Product Safety Commission for the year 1994 is Y 3.C 76/3:1/994 while the unnumbered general publication For Kid's Sake is classed as Y 3.C 76/3:2 K 54.

Congress and its Working Committees

The working committees of Congress such as Appropriations, Judiciary, etc., are grouped under Y 4. An author designation based on the name of the Committee follows the period and is followed by the colon. Thus the author designation based on the name of the Committee follows the period and is followed by the colon. Thus theHouse Committee on Judiciary is Y 4.J 89/1: and the Senate Committee on Judiciary is Y 4.J 89/2:, the slash and the numbers 1 and 2 being used to distinguish between the two committees.

Where series do occur within the publications of a Committee they have been treated in various ways. Some examples follow.

Congressional Directory. This has been given a series designation of "1" following the colon, as Y 4.P 93/1 :1 . Individual book numbers are then marked off by use of the slash following the series designation, as Y 4.P 93/1:1/ with the particular issue being designated by Congress, as Y 4.P 93/1:1/101.

Economic Indicators. This monthly periodical issued by the Joint Economic Committee has been assigned a place in the group of publications issued by this Committee by use of the Cutter designation following the colon (instead of the regular numerical series designation), based on the subject word "Economic" as Y 4.EC 7:EC 7 . The book numbers for individual issues are then designated by year of issue and number corresponding to the month of issue as 994-1 for January 1994, 994-2 for February 1994, etc. These are added to the series designation of "EC 7" following the colon and separated by the slash, as: June 1994 issue, Y 4.EC 7:EC 7/994-6 .

Serially Numbered Hearings and Committee Prints. Hearings and Committee prints of some Congressional Committees are numbered as serials within each Congress. These are designated by Congress and number (separated by the slash) immediately following the colon as: House Judiciary Committee Serial 13, 103rd Congress would be Y 4.J 89/1:103/13 , the number of the Congress taking the place of the usual numerical series designation. These are filed behind the hearings and committee prints bearing letter and number Cutter designation, i.e., to the right on the shelf.

Congressional Bills, Documents, and Reports. These numbered series of publications issued by Congress are not given a place in the system by use of lettered symbols but are simply filed at the end of all other classifications by Congress, session, and individual number with numbers representing the series titles.

Publications of the President and the Executive Office of the President including committees and commissions established by Executive Order and reporting directly to the President.

The agency symbol assigned to the President of the United States is PR followed by the number corresponding to the ordinal number of succession to the presidency as PR 42 , Bill Clinton,42nd president of the United States. The normal series and book numbers follow the class stem.

However, a different treatment has been necessary for the special committees and commissions established by the president to study particular problems and which report these findings directly to the president. These organizations usually cease to exist after making their report. As their publications are usually few in number, normal bureau treatment is not practical and special treatment is therefore indicated to prevent establishment of classes which will not be used, and to keep together the publications of all such organizations appointed by one president.

Therefore, beginning with those commissions appointed by President Eisenhower, one series class (PR -.8:) as been assigned to each based on the principal subject word of its name, as PR 34.8:H 81 , President's Advisory Committee on Government Housing Policies and Programs. Publications of the committee are distinguished by addition of the slash and Cutter numbers based on the principal subject word of the title as in normal classification.

Beginning with the administration of President Kennedy, the continuing offices assigned to the President, which make up the Executive Office of the President, have been given permanent classes under the symbol PREX . Previously, each change in administration required a change in classes for such offices as Office of Management and Budget, National Security Council, Central Intelligence Agency, etc. Subordinate offices of the Executive Office of the President are given their own numbers, the Office of Management and Budget for example, being assigned PREX 2. Series and book numbers are then assigned in the usual manner.


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Table I
Department and Agency Symbols Currently in Use

A Agriculture Department
AA ACTION
AC Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
AE National Archives and Records Administration
C Commerce Department
CC Federal Communications Commission
CR Civil Rights Commission
D Defense Department
EEnergy Department
E 2. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
E 3. Energy Information Administration
E 4. Economic Regulatory Administration
E 5. Bonneville Power Administration
E 6. Western Area Power Administration
E 7. Alaska Power Administration
ED Education Department
EP Environmental Protection Agency
FA Fine Arts Commission
FCA Farm Credit Administration
FEM Federal Emergency Management Agency
FHF Federal Housing Financing Board
FHL Federal Home Loan Bank Board
FM Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
FMC Federal Maritime Commission
FRFederal Reserve System Board of Governors
FTFederal Trade Commission
FTZ Foreign-Trade Zones Board
GA General Accounting Office
GPGovernment Printing Office
GSGeneral Services Administration
HEHealth and Human Services Department
HHHousing and Urban Development Department
IInterior Department
IA U.S. Information Agency
IC Interstate Commerce Commission
ITC International Trade Commission
JJustice Department
JU Judiciary
L Labor Department
LC Library of Congress
LR National Labor Relations Board
MS Merit Systems Protection Board
NAS National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NC National Capital Planning Commission
NCU National Credit Union Administration
NF National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities
NMB National Mediation Board
NS National Science Foundation
OP Overseas Private Investment Corporation
P United States Postal Service
PE Peace Corps
PM Personnel Management Office
PR President of the United States
PREX Executive Office of the President
PRVP Vice President of the United States
RR Railroad Retirement Board
S State Department
SBA Small Business Administration
SE Securities and Exchange Commission
SI Smithsonian Institution
T Treasury Department
TC International Trade Commission
TD Transportation Department
VA Veterans Affairs Department
X and Y Congress

Table II
Agency Symbols of Boards, Commissions, and Committees Established by Act of Congress or under Authority of an Act of Congress (not specifically designated in the Executive Branch of the Government nor as completeley independent agencies.)

Y 3.AC 7: National Commission on AIDS
Y 3.AD 6:Administrative Conference of United States
Y 3.AD 9/8: Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations
Y 3.AD 9/12: United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy
Y 3.AF 8:The African Development Foundation
Y 3.AM 3/2: National Commission on American Indian, Alaska Native & Native Hawaiian Housing
Y 3.AM 3: American Battle Monuments Commission
Y 3.AP 4/2: Appalachian Regional Commission
Y 3.B 27:Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board
Y 3.B 49:National Advisory and Coordinating Council on Bilingual Education
Y 3.B 78:Board for International Broadcasting
Y 3.C 43/5: National Commission on Children
Y 3.C 73/5: Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Y 3.C 73/6: Competitiveness Policy Council
Y 3.C 76/3: Consumer Product Safety Commission
Y 3.C 76/4: Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress
Y 3.D 36/2: Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission
Y 3.ED 8/11: National Commission on Responsibilities for Financing Postsecondary Education
Y 3.EL 2/3:Federal Election Commission
Y 3.EM 7/3: National Commission for Employment Policy
Y 3.EN 2:United States Enrichment Corporation
Y 3.EQ 2:Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Y 3.ET 3:Office of Government Ethics
Y 3.EX 7/3: Export-Import Bank of United States
Y 3.F 31/15: Federal Council on Aging
Y 3.F 31/16: Federal Council for Science and Technology
Y 3.F 31/18: Federal Working Group on Pest Management
Y 3.F 31/20: Federal Executive Board
Y 3.F 31/21-3: Federal Labor Relations Authority
Y 3.F 31/25:Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board
Y 3.F 31/8: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Y 3.F 32:National Commission on Financial Institution Reform, Recovery and Enforcement
Y 3.F 76/3: Foreign Claims Settlement Commission
Y 3.H 19:National Council on Disability
Y 3.H 62:Advisory Council of Historic Preservation
Y 3.H 62/4: White House Historical Association
Y 3.H 74:United States Holocaust Memorial Council
Y 3.H 75:Interagency Council on the Homeless
Y 3.IN 2/10: National Advisory Council on Indian Education
Y 3.IN 8/25: Inter-American Foundation
Y 3.IN 8/31: Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation
Y 3.J 27: Japan-United States Friendship Commission
Y 3.L 61: National Commission on Libraries and Information Science
Y 3.L 71: National Institute for Literacy
Y 3.M 33/3: Marine Mammal Commission
Y 3.M 46/2: Council on Graduate Medical Education
Y 3.M 53/2: Merchant Marine and Defense Commission
Y 3.M 58: Migratory Bird Conservation Commission
Y 3.M 66: Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission
Y 3.N 16: National Narcotics Intelligence Consumers Committee
Y 3.N 21/16: National Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial Policies
Y 3.N 21/29: The Corporation for National and Community Service
Y 3.N 88: Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Y 3.N 88/2: Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board
Y 3.N 95: National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council
Y 3.OC 1: Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission Center
Y 3.P 19/2: Panama Canal Commission
Y 3.P 29: Prospective Payment Assessment Commission
Y 3.P 31: United States Institute of Peace
Y 3.P 38: Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation
Y 3.P 38/2: Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation
Y 3.P 84/4: Postal Rate Commission
Y 3.P 94: National Center for Productivity and Quality of Working Life
Y 3.P 97: Committee for Purchase from the Blind and Other Severely Handicapped
Y 3.R 13/4: United States Railroad Association
Y 3.R 31/2:15 .Resolution Trust Corporation
Y 3.R 67: Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Y 3.SE 4: Selective Service System
Y 3.SE 5: United States Sentencing Commission
Y 3.SE 5/3: National Advisory Committee on Semiconductors
Y 3.T 22/2: Technology Assessment Office
Y 3.T 25: Tennessee Valley Authority

Table III
Agency Symbols of Current Congressional Committees

Y 4.AG 4: Special Committee on Aging (Senate)
Y 4.AG 4/2: Select Committee on Aging (House)
Y 4.AG 8/1: Committee on Agriculture (House)
Y 4.AG 8/3: Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry (Senate)
Y 4.AP 6/1: Committee on Appropriations (House)
Y 4.AP 6/2: Committee on Appropriations (Senate)
Y 4.AR 5/2: Committee on Armed Services (House)
Y 4.AR 5/3: Committee on Armed Services (Senate)
Y 4.AR 7: Art and Antiquities Commission (Senate)
Y 4.B 22/1: Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs (House)
Y 4.B 22/3: Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs (Senate)
Y 4.B 85/2: Committee on Budget (Senate)
Y 4.B 85/3: Committee on Budget (House)
Y 4.C 43/2: Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families (House)
Y 4.C 73/7: Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation (Senate)
Y 4.D 63/1: Committee on District of Columbia (House)
Y 4.E 7:Joint Economic Committee
Y 4.ED 8/1: Committee on Education & Labor (House)
Y 4.EN 2: Energy and Natural Resources Committee (Senate)
Y 4.EN 2/3: Committee on Energy and Commerce (House)
Y 4.ET 3/4: Select Committee on Ethics (Senate)
Y 4.F 49: Committee on Finance (Senate)
Y 4.F 76/1: Committee on Foreign Affairs (House)
Y 4.F 76/2: Committee on Foreign Relations (Senate)
Y 4.G 74/7: Committee on Government Operations (House)
Y 4.G 74/9: Committee on Governmental Affairs (Senate)
Y 4.H 81/3: Committee on House Administration (House)
Y 4.H 89: Select Committee on Hunger (House)
Y 4.IN 2/11: Select Committee on Indian Affairs (Senate)
Y 4.IN 8/14: Committee on Interior & Insular Affairs (House)
Y 4.IN 8/14: Committee on Natural Resources (House)
Y 4.IN 8/18: Select Committee on Intelligence (House)
Y 4.IN 8/19: Select Committee on Intelligence (Senate)
Y 4.J 89/1:Committee on Judiciary (House)
Y 4.J 89/2:Committee on Judiciary (Senate)
Y 4.L 11/4: Committee on Labor and Human Resources (Senate)
Y 4.L 61/2: Joint Committee on the Library
Y 4.M 53: Committee on Merchant Marine & Fisheries (House)
Y 4.N 16:Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control (House)
Y 4.P 84/10: Committee on Post Office & Civil Service (House)
Y 4.P 93/1:Joint Committee on Printing
Y 4.P 93/8:Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs
Y 4.P 96/10: Committee on Environment and Public Works (Senate)
Y 4.P 96/11: Committee on Public Works and Transportation (House)
Y 4.R 86/1:Committee on Rules (House)
Y 4.R 86/2:Committee on Rules & Administration (Senate)
Y 4.SCI 2:Committee on Science and Technology (House)
Y 4.SE 2:Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe
Y 4.SM 1: Committee on Small Business (House)
Y 4.SM 1/2: Committee on Small Business (Senate)
Y 4.ST 2/3: Committee on Standards of Official Conduct (House)
Y 4.T 19/4: Joint Committee on Taxation
Y 4.V 64/3: Committee on Veterans' Affairs (House)
Y 4.V 64/4: Committee on Veterans' Affairs (Senate)
Y 4.W 36: Committee on Ways and Means (House)

Table IV
Classification of Congressional Publications (other than bills, documents, and reports)

XCongressional Record (bound). Congress and session form the series designation with individual book numbers made up of volume and part. For Example: 100th Congress, 2d session, volume 134, part 2, classified X.100/2:134/pt.2
X/a.Congressional Record (daily). These are numbered throughout each session with volume number and issue number. For example: 101st Congress, 2nd session, issue number 89 is classified X/a.101/2:136/89.
XJH:Journal of the House of Representatives. These are designated by Congress and session as XJH:100-1
XJS:Journal of the Senate. Designated by Congress and session as XJS:101-1.
Y 1.2:House of Representatives miscellaneous publications. Individual book numbers are assigned using the Cutter table for unnumbered publications.
Y 1.2/2:Calendars of the United States House of Representatives and history of legislation. Book numbers are assigned by Congress, session, and individual number as Y 1.2/2:990/78.
Y 1.3:Senate miscellaneous publications. Individual book numbers are assigned using the Cutter table for unnumbered publications. The volumes of the Journal of executive proceedings are given the Cutter designation EX 3 with the volume numbers added as Y 1.1:EX 3/V.91,PT.2.
Y 1.3/3:Calendar of business. Book numbers are assigned by Congress and individual number as Y 1.3/3:990/85.
Y 3.Boards, Commissions, and Committees.
Y 4.Congressional Committees.
Y 7.1:Memorial Addresses on life and character of deceased members of Congress. Individual book numbers are assigned by use of the 3-figure Cutter table based ono the name of the deceased member.
Y 10.Congressional Budget Office, Congress.

[Cover and front matter] [cover]

GP 3.2:C 56/8/990

An Explanation of the Superintendent of Documents Classification System

GPO Publication 500.5

October 1990

[Title Page]

An Explanation of the Superintendent of Documents Classification System

Depository Administration Branch
Library Division
Library Programs Service
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, DC 20401

Revised 1990

[Note accompanying the HTML version]

This version of the 1990 edition of the An Explanation of the Superintendent of Documents Classification System was entered manually and coded by Tom Tyler, Associate Director/Technical Services, University of Denver Library using Kris Nosack's HTML Writer (v.09 beta 4a). Netscape Navigator versions 1.1n and 2.0 were used to test the coded files.

This and other basic documents of the Federal Depository Library Program are offered in this format from this site as a service to the library community.


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