Gen-X on Ice The Weekly�s MARGARET WERTHEIM was the National Science Foundation�s visiting journalist to Antarctica for the 2004�05 season. In the first of two articles on her recent trip, she reports on the daily life and work of a group of young women scientists.

Who�ll Stop the Reign? The Aryan Brotherhood is the most murderous prison gang in the country. Mild-mannered assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Jessner is about to face off against gang leaders with the largest death-penalty indictment in the history of the American justice system. BY MATTHEW DUERSTEN


Image Control "Hawk and Dove," by MR. FISH. Plus, The Long and Winding Road... to an Exit Strategy and Looking Out for You, Vast Left-Wing Conspiracy in FILTERED.

Unwelcome Advances: It may be clinical when it comes to the governor and messy budgets. BY BILL BRADLEY

Dancing in the Rain: U.S. Iraqis visit the polls twice to vote. BY STEVEN MIKULAN

Post Cards of Intolerance: The Bush administration once again bows to the Christian-inspired attack on gays. BY DOUG IRELAND

Secret Summits: Laura Chick summons Hahn�s challengers to her home for scandal talk. BY JEFFREY ANDERSON

Home With the Homeless: Spending a night with two who helped with the L.A. count. BY CHRISTINE PELISEK

Plus, JEFFREY ANDERSON on the end of Empire, the lucrative DWP contract under fire.


Dissonance Iraq�s triumph: Lessons from a shaky democracy.
BY MARC COOPER

Powerlines Creating California: Pat Brown knew how to build a great state; Arnold knows how to dismantle it. BY HAROLD MEYERSON

Deadline Hollywood Hollywood reporters and Gatsby envy: Why do journalists lust after the trappings of Tinseltown? BY NIKKI FINKE

A Considerable Town At Sundance, RON STRINGER encounters a self-promoting, filmmaking priest . . . during mass; DAVE SHULMAN watches Dennis Miller and Bill Maher play nice; and PAUL KRASSNER says, "Grammys, Shrammies."

Plus, MARK "THE COBRASNAKE" HUNTER�s Snake Bites.

Letters
We write, you write...

ROCKIE HOROSCOPE

FILM
Vanishing acts: ELLA TAYLOR finds that fragmented identities abound at Sundance 2005. Plus, SCOTT FOUNDAS on why Sundance is for independents � authentic and otherwise.

BOOKS
Where fish fall from the sky: The magic of Murakami.
BY SARAH CHUNG

Plus, GREG GOLDIN on The Next Los Angeles.

THEATER
Shackles and Flight: Charlayne Woodard�s play about getting through the dark. BY STEVEN LEIGH MORRIS

ART
Good "Thing": Emerging L.A. sculptors at the Hammer. BY DOUG HARVEY

TV
Requiem for a heavyweight: ELLA TAYLOR weighs in on Shola Lynch�s Chisholm �72 � Unbought and Unbossed.

MUSIC
California love: The Game and Daz bring gangsta back where it belongs. BY BEN QUIÑONES

John Zorn is where you find him. BY GREG BURK.

Live in L.A. Psychedelic Furs; Richard Divine, Edit, Bus Driver; François K�s Deep Space; Thalia Zedek, Visqueen; Dianne Reeves, Misa Justa.

A Lot of Night Music: Roméo et Juliette; recent chamber music. BY ALAN RICH

COMICS
"BEK," BY BRUCE ERIC KAPLAN

J.T. STEINY�s Larchmont Country Safari

RESTAURANTS
Counter Intelligence Grace under fire: Indo Kitchen. BY JONATHAN GOLD

Ask Mr. Gold The Turkish lover. BY JONATHAN GOLD

WHERE TO EAT NOW
WhereTo Eat Now: West L.A. and Culver City

Database of restaurant listings compiled by JONATHAN GOLD and MICHELLE HUNEVEN.

CALENDAR
Tsunami disaster relief: For a list of aid agencies accepting contributions to help those affected by the earthquake and tsunami in South Asia, please see the "Do Good" column in Calendar.

Good Times

>Picks of the Week

>Music Picks of the Week

>Neighborhood Movie Guide


> Crossword

VLAD
For those who never caught Coppola�s revisionist Dracula, Vlad the Impaler, a 15th-century Carpathian king who skewered and mutilated his victims, is thought to be the real-world model for Bela Lugosi�s bloodthirsty alter ego. Vlad � involving four good-looking, underdressed grad students pursued across darkest Romania by the restless ghost of the Impaler � marks the cheerfully absurd debut of writer-director Michael D. Sellers, whose previous credits include 10 years in clandestine operations in the CIA. Billy Zane and Brad Dourif start off the proceedings as loyal Romanians trying to lay Vlad�s ghost to rest by returning an amulet . . . Oh, never mind. Time travel, lifts from Rosemary�s Baby and Tolkien�s Rings cycle, hot babes speaking Chaucerian Middle English, Brad Dourif rolling his eyes like Elisha Cook Jr. � it all adds up to pleasantly nonsensical mayhem. The loopy screenplay is surprisingly historical, in the same wonky style as the recent King Arthur, only with a few Sesame Street jokes thrown in. Round that out with a couple of sons of famous people � Francesco Quinn, son of Anthony, all piercing eyes in the title role, and Nicholas Irons, son of Jeremy, as a dissolute Cambridge man � and it�s a debut to make Langley proud. (Jon Strickland)
 


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