U.S. Egg Industry Fact Sheet

Revised 9/04

•    Per capita consumption is a measure of total egg production divided by the total population. It does not represent demand. (USDA has recently adjusted data to reflect 2000 Census figures.)

     1993 – 234.6     1995 – 233.5*     1997 – 235.6      1999 – 249.8      2001 – 252.8   2003 – 254.1     

     1994 – 236.4     1996 – 234.6       1998 – 239.7      2000 – 251.7      2002 – 253.5         

   * there was a reduction due to the decrease in bird numbers as a result of extreme heat and weather conditions.

•    The high point for per capita egg consumption was 402 eggs in 1945. Per capita consumption had been steadily declining due to life style changes with more women working and to health concerns. Per capita consumption reached its lowest in 1991 (233.9), but has steadily increased as the good news about eggs reached consumers.

 

•    Currently, the top ten egg producing states (ranked by number of layers represented in thousands) are: 

     1. Iowa – 44,271, 2. Ohio -27,278, 3. Indiana -23,474, 4. Pennsylvania -22,340, 5. California -20,073

     6. Texas - 13,679, 7. Nebraska -11,496, 8. Florida -11,000, 9. Georgia -10,965,  10. Minnesota -10,103

 

•    The five largest egg producing states represent approximately 50% of all U.S. layers.

 

•    U.S. egg production during July 2004 was 6.45 billion table eggs. Total U.S egg production during 2003 was 73.93 billion table eggs.

 

•    Presently, there are 64 egg producing companies with 1 million plus layers and 11 companies with greater than 5 million layers.**

 

•    To date, there are approximately 260 egg producing companies with flocks of 75,000 hens or more. These 260 companies represent about 95% of all the layers in the U.S.** Seventeen years ago (1987), there were around 2,500 operations.** (Number of operations in 1987 include some contract farms and divisions.) 

 

•    In 2003, the average number of egg-type laying hens in the U.S. was 278.3 million. Flock size for August 1, 2004 was 283 million layers; 3.18% larger than a year ago, up 9 million hens. Rate of lay per day on August 1, 2004 averaged 71.0 eggs per 100 layers, down one percent from a year ago.

 

•   Of the 206.9 million cases of shell eggs produced in 2003:

         60.9 million cases were further processed (for foodservice, manufacturing, retail & export);

125.8 million cases (60.87%) went to retail;

18.6 million cases (9.4%) went for foodservice use; and

1.6 million cases ( 0.8%) were exported.

 

•    During the first five months 2004, the U.S. exported 12.3 million dozen table eggs, a decrease of 37 percent from the same period in 2003. Table egg export value for January-May was $10.2 million, down 3 percent. Top markets included Canada and Hong Kong. In the first five months of this year, Canada imported 8.4 million dozen table eggs – a 211 percent increase over 2003 –valued at $6.7 million, up 204 percent. Egg exports to Hong Kong totaled 2.8 million dozen, a decrease of 63 percent. Value decreased by 33 percent to $2.4 million. Unlike last year, when the EU imported significant quantities of U.S. eggs to counter a severe domestic shortfall because of disease problems in several egg-producing EU member states, the U.S. exported no eggs to the EU in the first five months of the year.

 

Egg product exports during January through May of 2004 decreased in value by 9 percent to $33.7 million compared to the same period in 2003. Canada remained the largest market for U.S. egg products, importing about $11.9 million, an increase of 11 percent. The EU followed with imports of $8 million, up 10 percent. Exports to Japan, which had traditionally been the largest and most consistent market for U.S. egg products, fell by 58 percent, to $5 million, as the U.S. and Japanese government continue to negotiate terms of a cooking time and temperature protocol for pasteurized egg products. ***

 

Source:  U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, **American Egg Board, ***USAPEEC