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500 Rummy: Beautiful Rummy

© Copyright 1993-2003 John James Davidson. All Rights Reserved.
.......These rules have been registered with the Library of Congress.

500 Rummy: Beautiful Rummy

500 Rummy: Beautiful Rummy
.......Two to eight people may play. This game is for children on up. This is a basic version of 500 Rummy. Versions which give you 3 options when drawing instead of only 2 like this one are much more fun instead of rather boring.

Preliminaries
The Card Deck.  If 2 to 4 people are playing, you play with a card deck of 52 cards of 13 ranks and 4 suits. If 5 or more are playing, you play with a card deck of 104 cards of 13 ranks and 4 suits. An ace may rank high or low for a sequence.\ The other cards rank from a king, queen, jack (or princess), and 10 down to a 2.\
.......A joker (or Mother Nature) can be used as a replacement card if any other card gets damaged or lost. Bridge-size cards (around 3 1/2 by 2 1/4") may be better to use than poker-size cards (around 3 1/2 by 2 1/2") because of melding space and that they're easier to hold if holding a lot.
The Deal.  The cards are shuffled and cut. The cards are then spread out face down. Then, each person draws 1 card, but not any of the 4 cards at either end of the deck. The person who draws the highest card deals the first hand. An ace ranks highest in choosing the first dealer. If there's a tie among the highest cards disregarding suits, the persons who drew these cards draw another card.
.......You should write a miniature d on the paper the score is being kept, underneath the person's name of who's the first dealer. This helps keep track of who'll be dealing each hand.
.......Everyone who wants may shuffle or help shuffle the cards, although the dealer has the privilege of shuffling last. The dealer then presents the cards to the person at his/her right to be cut. This person must cut by picking up and placing the top part of the pack toward the dealer who completes the cut. Both packets must contain at least 5 cards. (Before the first hand is dealt, the cards are shuffled 1 time thoroughly and 1 time adequately and cut 2 times.)
.......This is part of a good shuffle, in which you can use a card deck to see how it goes. Deal the cards that were just used into a number of piles (clockwise in 2 rows); the "number" is to be the length of what was the longest meld plus 3 or more (the longest meld could've been an addition of 4 or more cards). Then of what was the stock pile is split up onto these piles.
.......The dealer deals the cards clockwise 1 at a time to each player, starting with the player to his/her left. When 2 play, each receives 13 cards. When 3 or more play, each receives 7 cards. Until all the cards are dealt, no one may pick up any of his/her cards.
.......After the deal, the undealt cards are set face down between the players and are called the stock pile. The top card is turned face up and placed beside it as the upcard, the first card of the discard pile.
.......The turn to deal passes clockwise.

The Play
The Main Object.  The main object is usually to make points by matching cards to make melds. A meld is a group or sequence of 3 or more cards, or a 1- or more card group or sequence addition. A group is made up of cards which are of the same rank, or have the same index value, like a 3-card group of 5's. A sequence is a consecutive order of cards in the same suit, like a 5, 6, and 7 of hearts.
.......Realize that when a hand ends points are subtracted from your score for any cards left in your hand.
The Play.  The person at the dealer's left plays first; the play continues clockwise. To begin your turn, you do 1 of 3 things:
.......1. You may draw a card from the stock pile.
.......2. You may draw a card below the top card of the discard pile if you meld it, and take in or meld all the cards above it.
.......3. You may draw the top card of the discard pile without having to meld it. (You may meld it, though, if you want. You could discard this same card if you want. There being a stock pile and everyone 3 rounds in a row drew the top card of the discard pile without melding, the hand would end with points reckoned after the last person discarded; with the wording of these rules, you always draw only 1 card from the discard pile; however other cards further up within it may help meld the card you're drawing.)
.......You may then meld or meld some more from your hand, if you want. You then discard a card, which ends your turn.
Melding.  To meld, you lay down a card or cards in front of you face up when it's your turn; you may keep melds in your hand, though, if you want. Once a card is melded, it's supposed to stay melded.
.......You may add to your own and other persons' melds with 1 or more cards when it's your turn. When you add to another person's meld, you keep your card or cards in front of you to score for yourself, not with the meld you're adding to, and must tell the others to which meld you're adding.
The Discard Pile.  The discard pile is made up of discarded cards except for the very first card of it, which is turned face up from the stock pile. Discarding is placing a card from your hand face up at the top of the discard pile, which ends your turn. The discard pile is kept spread out, so you can see all the cards in it.
.......To meld a card you draw from the discard pile, you could use a card or cards from your hand and/or a card or cards above the card you draw and/or a meld (or 2 sequences).\ Below the top card, you should always "show" you can meld the card you're drawing before you draw it. You may then meld some more, if you want, from any cards that were in your hand and any cards you took in.
.......With an 8 of hearts in your hand or in the discard pile and a 9 of hearts in the discard pile, you could draw the 9 or lowermost card in the discard pile and add both cards to another person's 5, 6, and 7 of hearts sequence.
.......To properly draw a card below the top card of the discard pile, first you "show" how you'll meld the card you're drawing, second you "detach" cards from the discard pile from (including) the card you're drawing, third you simply "meld" the card, fourth you "take in" any detached cards.
Sequences.  An ace may rank above a king or below a 2 for a sequence.\ The sequence, 2, ace, king isn't allowed.\ You may add to sequence additions of course.
Sequences with a 104-card Deck.  Every sequence must be and stay in a "simple" consecutive order.\ If anyone's 8 of hearts were added to anyone's 5, 6, and 7 of hearts, then the next card added by anyone to that end of the sequence must be a 9 of hearts, not the other 8 of hearts.
.......You may connect, perhaps not physically, sequences and sequence additions while you're adding a card or cards. You could add a 4, 5, and 6 of hearts from your hand and/or from the discard pile to both a melded ace, 2, and 3 of hearts sequence and a melded 7 and 8 of hearts addition. (There's no disconnecting at all.) (With a 52-card deck so no one will get confused, always connect a sequence or sequence addition of yours that's continuous with another sequence or sequence addition of yours in the same suit.)
.......A sequence (including entirely all the additions) may have up to 13 (not 14) cards.

The End of a Hand
Going Out.  A person may go out by discarding (his/her last card) or by melding (his/her last card). When someone goes out, the hand ends, and the points are reckoned.
.......If the stock pile becomes exhausted, the hand ends with points reckoned if someone goes out of course, or when someone doesn't (or wishes not to) draw from the discard pile (after the person drawing the last card of the stock pile finishes his/her turn of course), or when everyone in a row doesn't meld.
.......You may ask any other player(s) how many cards are in their hand(s) at any time. You may also check how many cards remain in the stock pile at any time.
Scoring.  When a hand ends, you score points for the cards you laid down. You score 10 points for each face card and 10, the numerical value (of the card) for each 9 to 2, and 15 points for each ace, or 1 point for each ace used in a low sequence.\
.......For any cards left in your hand, you subtract the same amount of points, 15 points for each ace.
.......The game is played to 500 points when 2 people play; 300 points with 3 people; 250 points with 4 or 5 people; and 200 points with 6, 7, or 8 people. A running total of each person's score is kept on paper. At the end of a hand, someone at or above the finishing point and with the highest score wins the game. The winner wins from each other person the difference between their final scores. A game would end in a tie if the top scores at the end of a hand were at or above the finishing point and happened to be identical. If there's a tie, each non-winner would lose only a single amount.


Supplementary Notes (for 500 Rummy: Beautiful Rummy)

.......To fairly quickly make a 52-card deck from a 104-card deck, or to fairly quickly find out which card or cards are missing from either a 104-card deck or 52-card deck, first sort the cards face up in a top row of kings, queens, jacks (or princesses); in a middle row of 10's, 9's, 8's, 7's, 6's; and in a bottom row of 5's, 4's, 3's, 2's, aces. The rest is easy.

.......Your melds should be melded neatly and usually in a standard way. Your groups and group additions should usually be kept in a row, like AAA, 999, 7, 222 (from A to 2, from your left to right). Your sequences should usually be kept in a row above your groups and group additions, or to the left of them without much melding space, like AKQ, 987, 7654. And you should usually really try to keep your sequence additions in very logical places.

Symbol.  \ Any sequence referred to in the preceding sentence can pertain to a sequence addition.


Variations

1. Playing to Win.  The winner of a game wins 1 game point. The winner doesn't win from each other person the difference between their final scores. If there happened to be a tie, each winner would split the game point. If only 2 people play, each is dealt only 7 cards to possibly help a player who ends up behind.

2. Must Go Out to Win.  The winner of a game wins 1 game point. The winner doesn't win from each other person the difference between their final scores.
.......You must go out with a score at or above the finishing point to win. You can win even if any other players end up with higher scores. Going out and not reaching the finishing point doesn't count towards a win. (Unlike with Playing to Win if only 2 people play, each is dealt the usual 13 cards to maybe really help a player who ends up behind.)
.......(This variation was found from John McLeod with many thanks from his "500 Rum" page which is on the Card Games web site at http://www.pagat.com/ which is extremely vast.)

3. "Going Rummy with the Top Card."  This is a traditional variation and is mediocre compared with the next variation. If a player discards a card that could've been easily melded (and isn't going out), another player can call "Rummy" and meld the card like so. Then this second person discards a card. The game continues with the "in-turn player," as if no one had gone rummy, unless the player who went rummy went out or another rummy is called and so on.
.......When a card being discarded touches the discard pile, you may call rummy. You must call rummy before the next player is drawing. If 2 or more players call rummy simultaneously, figure the priority by going clockwise from the player whose turn it's about to be. And the only thing a player who goes rummy may do, besides melding the rummy card, is connect 2 sequences using the rummy card.\

4. "Going Rummy with Any Cards."  This is like the preceding variation except for the following. Like the preceding variation, you may only call "Rummy" between turns (or after anyone has discarded from a rummy) and not with a rummy you yourself just created. You may call "Rummy" though with any card or cards in the discard pile that can be melded without the help of any cards from your hand, like even a 5, 6, and 7 of hearts all within the discard pile.
.......If more than 1 rummy is called at a time any calls other than the first are disregarded but may be called again after the first rummy is completed by discarding a card. You would take cards from the discard pile from (including) the bottom-most rummy card. And after you meld the rummy card or cards, you continue your rummy as if it were a turn of yours, then discarding a card unless you went out by melding.
.......If you create any rummys when melding any cards or when discarding a card, you yourself may not call any of these rummies until the end of someone else's turn (unless at least 1 of at least 2 cards in the discard pile of a sequence rummy was to get modified by another person doing a rummy, like with an 8 and 9 for a 5, 6, 7, not like with a 7 and 8 for a 5, 6, wild card).\
.......(This variation was found from John McLeod with many thanks from his "500 Rum" page which is on the Card Games web site at http://www.pagat.com/ which is extremely vast.)

5. Going Rummy.  A player scores double if he/she has not melded previously and then all at once goes out.

6. Discarding an Unmeldable Card to Go Out.  To go out you must discard a card and it must be unmeldable. If you discarded the only card in you hand and it was at that moment meldable (or tradable, a natural card for a wild card) or if you meld the rest of your cards, you're considered floating (but not out). (Disregard the discard pile except a card you may have just discarded.) If you're floating, you may not draw only the top card of the discard pile if it's unmeldable.

7. Melding All (Your Cards) to Go Out.   If you have 1 card in your hand and you discard it, you're considered floating (but not out).

8. One or More Wild Cards.  A joker (or Mother Nature) may be used as a wild card. Add 1 or 2 with 52 cards, or 2 to 4 with 104 cards. A wild card may represent 1 of the 13 regular ranks for a group (or group addition) or a regular rank and suit for a sequence (or sequence addition). You must make it clear what a wild card is being melded as, and it must remain melded as such. You're allowed to have more than a 4-card group with 52-plus cards, and more than an 8-card group with 104-plus cards. A wild card is 20 points plus or minus.

9. Trading for Wild Cards.  This is like the preceding variation except for the following. A wild card must remain melded as is unless traded for.
.......You may trade natural cards from your hand for wild cards in your own and other persons' melds clearly after drawing (during your turn), not while drawing. If anyone had a sequence of a 5 and 6 of hearts, wild card, you could trade a natural 7 of hearts from your hand for the wild card. When you've traded for a wild card, you may use it anyway you want, even keep it in your hand.
.......Trading for a wild card at the very end of a sequence would be considered adding a card for connecting sequences.\
.......With "Going Rummy with the Top Card": If a natural card is discarded that could be traded for a wild card, that would be a "rummy." If another person calls the rummy and trades, he/she would keep the wild card in their hand for the time being and discard 1 card. However if you call rummy with a discarded wild card, you must simply meld it not trade it; then you discard 1 card.
.......With "Going Rummy with Any Cards": You may trade any natural cards from the discard pile for any melded wild cards to do a rummy and trade during a rummy.

10. Going Out Bonus.  If you go out on your first turn, you score twice as much for your melds. You may go out on your first turn without drawing anything, and you wouldn't discard either; you would meld your last card (you could still "go rummy" before your turn, and trade for any wild cards); you score 3 times as much for your melds. For going out after your first turn, you score 20 extra points.

11. Michigan Rummy.  When a player goes out, he/she scores the total points remaining in the other players' hands, including of course what he/she has melded. For the cards left in the other players' hands, points aren't subtracted from their scores. If a player for any reason says he/she can go out and doesn't, each other player has 20 points immediately added to their score. Every deal is played out as usual.
.......If this variation was played with the Going Rummy variation, then the total points remaining in the other players' hands wouldn't be doubled.

12. Polish Rummy.  For your draw, you may take the entire discard pile without having to meld the bottom card.

13. Wildcat Rummy.  This is a wild variation. You can find this variation in Scarne's Encyclopedia of Games by John Scarne.

14. Partnerships.  Two players play against two players, and the partners sit across from one another. At the end of each hand, each partnership's points are scored together. A game is played to 500 points.

15. Persian Rummy.  This is an elaboration of the preceding variation. If you really like playing in partnerships, you can find different versions of this variation in various card-playing sources. The United States Playing Card Company has a good version of Persian Rummy on their web page entitled Rummy Games.

16. Extra Card Dealt.  Instead of an upcard being turned up after the cards are dealt, the dealer deals the player to his/her left an extra card. This player then just discards for his/her turn. This mimimizes his/her advantage of going first.

17. Exchanging Upcard.  The player at the dealer's left may draw the upcard and begin the hand as usual. If he/she doesn't want the upcard then the next player may exchange the upcard with another card. If this person doesn't want it either then the next player may exchange and so on. If the player at the dealer's left didn't want to exchange and whether or not anyone else exchanged, the player at the dealer's left would begin the hand by drawing from the stock pile.

18. Money Cards.  If you meld both a natural queen and 7 of hearts, you get 50 extra points. If you also meld both another natural queen and 7 of hearts, you get another 50 extra points. When someone goes out, each queen of hearts caught in your hand is worth minus 30 points.

19. Doubling.  This variation is for 2 players only. Only play this just for fun! The amount lost is often astronomical, and if you're good you would really be cheating someone! (A Backgammon's doubling cube may be used.) Each played-out hand is initially for 1 point. You play 2 hands and again just for fun.
.......When choosing the first dealer if the 2 cards drawn are the same rank, there's what's called an automatic double which is automatically accepted by both players. Only 1 automatic double is permitted.
.......A player may double the stakes just before the other player draws. A player may not double 2 times in a row; he/she must wait until maybe the other player redoubles. When a player is doubled, he/she can except to play for the higher stakes or fold and lose what's already been played for.
.......However if a player is doubled, he/she may redouble immediately, called a beaver, and at the same time being the player allowed to double next.
.......If a hand is played out completely and if a player loses by 50 to 99 points, he/she is gammoned and loses twice as much. If a player loses by 100 points or more, he/she is backgammoned and loses 3 times as much. (A player may say "Wait" before the other player draws to give themselves time to decide whether to double or not.)

20. Limit-Poker 500.  This variation is for 2 players only. Only play this just for fun! There are no irregularities for one thing! A game is 2 hands and again just for fun. Each player antes 1 chip (of the smallest unit) before the cards are dealt. After the deal and after the upcard is turned face up, there's a betting round, the only betting round of the hand.
.......The betting may begin with the player opposite of the dealer. He/she may pass or bet. If someone bets folding, "equalizing," and raising begins (without being able to just pass if you're already equalized). Of course you can equalize and raise at the same time.
.......You may bet or raise from 1 chip to the limit 10 chips. You may raise only twice per hand. Technically there's only 1 bet and the rest are raises. However if you were the one to bet, you may still raise twice. If neither bets anything at all during the first two turns to do something, the betting ends there.
.......When the betting is over, the players begin to play out the hand. If you don't think you have a chance of winning the hand at any time, you may give up and lose the pot.
.......When the hand ends, the points are reckoned to see who won the pot. If there's a tie, the pot is split and returned to the players.

Traditional Perhaps Mediocre Variations
21. Simplified Scoring.  Each face card and 10 to 8 counts 10 points. Each 7 to 2 counts 5 points. And each ace counts 15 points unless used in a low sequence where it counts 5 points.\ This is perhaps mediocre since with the normal scoring there's at many times more, what would you know, thinking involved per play.

22. Having to Meld the Top Card.  When you draw only the top card of the discard pile, you must meld it. (Actually with the wording of these rules, you always draw only 1 card from the discard pile; however other cards further up within it may help meld the card you're drawing.)



I'm giving this wording and these rules away free for the time being.

After I get a very good response through email about this version of 500 Rummy of mine, I should then be able to find a way to sell the booklet. So everyone please send me as much email as you can by clicking here. Or you could send an email to Bonnie Blue, the illustrator of the rummy cards. Or you could contact about the booklet any toy and game brokers, the largest of these is Rehtmeyer Design & Licensing.

Notice how the rules above are not ambiguous and are complete. This means no more squabbles among players during play. Notice too how the wording is totally unique and how some of the rules are modified for normalcy.

500 Rummy is great for various amounts of players, from 2 to 8 to be exact. Gin is basically for only 2 people. And Canasta is basically for only 4 people. So if you learn how to play 500 Rummy then you can play with various amounts of people any time.

And if you know of any more good 500 Rummy variations, please email me by clicking here. If you live in a place like Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, you may really know something or could find out something.

Thanks.


Site's Initial Page  ·  Site's Secondary Page  ·  Overview of a Hand  ·  Previously Order Page  ·  Links  ·
Bonnie Blue's Rummy Cards  ·  500 Rummy: Beautiful Rummy (to top)  ·  5000 Rummy: Pleasant Rummy  ·
10,000 Rummy: Sublime Rummy--Please Print  ·  The Never to Be Forgotten Playing-Card Game  ·
More of Bonnie's Rummy Cards  ·  Bonnie Blue's Dolphin Jewelry in an Array of Styles to Buy and More  ·
Bonnie's 8 Special Rummy Cards  ·  Toy and Game Brokers


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© Copyright 1993-2003 John James Davidson. All Rights Reserved.