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Nebraska - Notre Dame Rivalry
story image 1 Myers Scores The Huskers' Lone Touchdown
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1924: Notre Dame Regains Control

Irish Dominate 34-6

by Mark Fricke
September 03, 2000


The 1924 matchup between the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Notre Dame Irish started off showing all the signs of repeated the results from the prior two years of meetings between the squads.

Notre Dame entered the game undefeated and looking forward to a possible National Championship. Nebraska featured a heavyweight squad that struggled at times during the year, but still retained some measure of respect among Western teams.

The Huskers were lead by All-American candidate Ed Weir. Weir was a 180 pound tackle who completely dominated the field every time he stepped onto it.

Notre Dame Knute Rockne continued what had become his standard practice. He started the game with his substitutes. As a result, several names that would become legends in college football actually watched the early part of the game from the sidelines. Don Miller, Elmer Layden, Harry Stuhldreher and Jim Crowley were into their senior years and had already captured the nation's attention as the "Four Horsemen." But on that November afternoon they were relegated to technical subs.

Husker coach Fred Dawson figured the best time to strike at the Irish wall was early, while the backups occupied the field. His strategy seemed like a solid one as the Irish found themselves plagued by early fumbles and miscues. Things blew up for Rockne when the Irish found themselves backup up near their own twenty yard line early in the first period. Eddie Sharer lined up to punt the Irish out of trouble, but he fumbled the snap. Elbert Bloodgood scooped up the loose ball and rumbled ten yards before being tackled at the Irish three yard line. Rockne had seen enough. He sent in his first line players in hopes of stopping the inevitable. Three plays later Douglas Myers went over from one yard out for the score. The kick was missed but Nebraska felt good about their 6-0 lead.

In the second period things started going the way Rockne had envisioned. Aided by a 23-yard Crowley run and a 33-yard pass from Stuhldreher to Crowley the Irish finally threatened to score. Stuhldreher provided the points with a short run, Crowley's kick gave Notre Dame their first lead of the game.

The Notre Dame front line defenders quickly shut sown Nebraska's next drive and Notre Dame took over near mid-field. The Irish pounded into the Husker line for short gains and a lengthy drive. They capped things off with a 10-yard Miller touchdown run. By half time the Irish had regained control with a 14-6 lead.

After the half time break, the Irish picked right back up where they started. The Huskers' opening punt was blocked setting up the next Irish score with good position on its own 47-yard line. A couple of brisk runs through the line finished with an 18-yard zig-zag run for touchdown by Don Miller. The two teams traded punts before Notre Dame scored once again before the end of the third period. Layden tossed a forward pass to Crowley for a 65-yard score. Going into the final stanza Notre Dame held an impressive 28-6 lead.

The Notre Dame attack continued to push through the fourth quarter and added one more touchdown before the end of the game.

The loss was tough for the Huskers, especially for Ed Weir. His efforts on the afternoon seemed to do little to stop the Irish attack. Rockne's boys had keyed on Weir all afternoon in an effort to neutralize him.

While it was in a losing effort, Weir's play that afternoon had caught the attention of many in the stands and on the field, including Irish head coach Knute Rockne. Following the game Rockne stormed into the Husker lockerroom with his usual bravado.

"Weir, I want Weir" Rockne shouted. The locker room parted and Rockne spotted Weir sitting with his head in his hands in front of his locker. The coach stormed over to the tackle, threw his arm around Weir and proclaimed "That was the greatest exhibition of play I have ever seen. There was never anything like it."

The accolades Rockne showered upon members of the Nebraska contingent was not reflected in the outside world. Notre Dame officials began complaining that the Lincoln locals were shouting epithets, insults and other disparaging remarks at the Irish players and fans. The tensions would quickly rise in the coming year and eventually lead to a parting of the ways between the two powerhouses.

 end of article dingbat


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