March 21, 2005



Edge 156
3.15.04
(5,200 words)

Arman Leroi
THE NATURE OF NORMAL HUMAN VARIETY


Search:

2005


Robert Trivers
ERNST MAYR: A REMEMBRANCE

[2.8.04]



The World Question Center - 2005
[1.4.05]

WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE IS TRUE EVEN THOUGH YOU CANNOT PROVE IT?



Katinka Matson
NEW IMAGE FOR THE NEW YEAR
[1.4.05]

2004


Benoit Mandelbrot
A THEORY OF ROUGHNESS

[12.20.04]


Gregory Bateson: The Centennial
AFTER BATESON
by John Brockman with an Afterword by Gregory Bateson
[11.20.04]


Robert Trivers: An Edge Special Event
A FULL-FORCE STORM WITH GALE WINDS BLOWING
[10.18.04]


V.S. Ramachandran:
THE ASTONISHING FRANCIS CRICK
[10.18.04]


SUMMER POSTCARDS - 2004
[10.4.04]


Smolin vs. Susskind:
THE ANTHROPIC PRINCIPLE
[8.17.04]


Richard Dawkins
TOPS PROSPECT'S LIST OF BRITAIN'S 100 TOP PUBLIC INTELLECTUALS

[7.21.04]


Nicholas Humphrey
A SELF WORTH HAVING
[6.30.04]


Scott Sampson
AN ECO-EVOLUTIONARY DANCE THROUGH DEEP TIME
[6.19.04]


Paul Bloom
NATURAL-BORN DUALISTS
[5.13.04]


W. Daniel Hillis
ARISTOTLE" (THE KNOWLEDGE WEB)?
[5.6.04]


Richard Dawkins
JOHN MAYNARD SMITH
[1920-2004]

[4.26.04]


Richard Dawkins
THE NEXT STEP, A NOBEL PRIZE FOR LITERATURE?
[4.26.04]


Nassim Nicholas
Taleb

LEARNING TO EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED
[4.19.04]


THE BILLIONAIRES' DINNER — 2004
[3.23.04]


Martin Seligman EUDAEMONIA, THE GOOD LIFE
[3.23.04]


Daniel Gilbert EFFECTIVE FORECASTING
...OR...THE BIG WOMBASSA

[2.13.04]


Gary Marcus
LANGUAGE, BIOLOGY, AND THE MIND
[1.28.04]


Stewart Brand
THE MOUNTAIN AND THE CLOCK
[1.18.04]


Edge 7th Anniversary:
A Photo Album

[1.12.04]


The World Question Center - 2004 [1.12.04]

WHAT'S YOUR LAW


Katinka Matson
PRINT EDITIONS

[1.12.04]




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THE NATURE OF NORMAL HUMAN VARIETY
A Talk with Armand Leroi


Armand Leroi Edge Video Broadband | Modem

Of course, there will be people who object. There will be people who will say that this is a revival of racial science. Perhaps so. I would argue, however, that even if this is a revival of racial science, we should engage in it for it does not follow that it is a revival of racist science. Indeed, I would argue, that it is just the opposite.

THE REALITY CLUB: James J. ODonnell, Andrew Brown, Tim D. White, Alun Andeson respond to Armand Leroi


AN EDGE SPECIAL EVENT

THE PANCAKE PEOPLE, OR, "THE GODS ARE POUNDING MY HEAD"
Richard Foreman

But today, I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self-evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the "instantly available". A new self that needs to contain less and less of an inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance—as we all become "pancake people"—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.

RICHARD FOREMAN, Founder Director, Ontological-Hysteric Theater, has written, directedand designed over fifty of his own plays both in New York City and abroad.  Five of his plays have received "OBIE" awards as best play of the year—and he has received five other "OBIE'S" for directing and for 'sustained achievement'.

vs.

THE GÖDEL-TO-GOOGLE NET
George Dyson



As Richard Foreman so beautifully describes it, we've been pounded into instantly-available pancakes, becoming the unpredictable but statistically critical synapses in the whole Gödel-to-Google net. Does the resulting mind (as Richardson would have it) belong to us? Or does it belong to something else?

GEORGE DYSON, science historian, is the author of Darwin Among the Machines.

___

Introduction

In early 2001, avant-garde playwright and director Richard Foreman, called to enquire about Edge's activities. He had noticed the optimism of the Edge crowd and the range of intellectual interests and endeavors and felt that he needed to to begin a process to explore these areas. Then 9/11 happened. We never had our planned meeting.

Several years have gone by and recently Foreman opened his most recent play for his Ontological-Hysteric Theater at St. Marks Church in the Bowery in New York City. He also announced that the play—The Gods Are Pounding My Head—would be his last.

Foreman presents Edge with a statement and a question. The statement appears in his program and frames the sadness of The Gods Are Pounding My Head. The question is an opening to the future. With both, Foreman belatedly hopes to engage Edge contributors in a discussion, and in this regard George Dyson has written the initial response, posted along with others, entitled "The Gödel-to-Google Net".

THE REALITY CLUB: Kevin Kelly, Jaron Lanier, Steven Johnson, Marvin Minsky, Douglas Rushkoff, Roger Schank, James O'Donnell, Rebecca Goldstein, respond to Richard Foreman and George Dyson


EDGE AT TED 2005


Craig Venter; Sergey Brin & Larry Page, Google; JB

On February 22nd, Edge presented a Reality Club Meeting at TED 2005, the annual conference in Monterey, CA for the movers and shakers in Technology, Entertainment, Design. The topic was "Science at the Edge: Rebooting Biology" and dealt with the intersection of biology and computation. The panelists were Rodney Brooks, Ray Kurzweil and Craig Venter.


MacKenzie & Jeff Bezos

In recent years, science has also become a central part of TED. In fact, nowhere else will you find such an intense concentration of major third culture intellectuals. And it's not just about their talks. Most of the speakers stick around for 3-4 days and are accessible to the other attendees. This year the list of scientists included: Rod Brooks, Robert Full, Brian Greene, Danny Hillis, Olivia Judson, Irene Pepperberg, Paul Sereno, Craig Venter, James Watson. Add to that mix science-minded thinkers such as Stewart Brand, Kevin Kelly, Howard Rheingold, Jeff Bezos, plus computer science pioneers such as Sergey Brin and Larry Page, inventors Ray Kurzweil and Dean Kamen, and finally top editors from Fortune, Time, Discover, Wired, Wall Street Journal.....it's was quite a week.

d4
Rodney Brooks, Brian Greene

 
d7 Peter Petre, Fortune
d6
Stewart Brand; Lori Park, Google
 
d3 Philip Elmer-DeWitt, Time
Steve Petranek, Discover

[The text of the Edge Reality Club Meeting featuring Rod Brooks, Ray Kiurzweil, and Craig Venter will appear in due course. The event was well-attended; the TEDsters were clearly into it.]



Society
LO QUE CREEN LOS CIENTIFICOS
Domingo 20 of February of 2005

JAVIER SAMPEDRO, Madrid

John Brockman, writer, publisher and events manager for the science elite, has asked a hundred researchers the question, What do you believe is true even though you cannot prove it? The answers are posted at his e-magazine Edge (www.edge.org), and they exert an unquestionable morbid fascination—those are the very ideas that scientists cannot confess in their technical papers.

Since the Big Bang, matter has been busy organizing itself on particles, atoms, stars, planets, organic compounds and (on Earth at least) bacteria, animals and conscious brains. That is what scientists think proved. But their unproven beliefs tell another story, or thousand others.

“I doubt that the Big Bang is the beginning of time, I strongly suspect that our history extends backwards before that”, writes in Edge Lee Smolin, theoretical physicist. He cannot prove it, but he believes it. As his colleague Lawrence Krauss believes, without proofs too, that “there are likely to be a large, and possibly infinite number of other universes out there, some of which may be experiencing Big Bangs at the current moment”.

God does not play dices, said Einstein, but Alexander Vilenkin thinks he played dices too much…

Spanish original...



ERNST MAYR (1904-2005)

Ernst Mayr: A Remembrance
By Robert Trivers

Ernst Mayr is dead at a hundred years of age, as lordly a cedar as ever stood in evolutionary biology and life more generally. He was full of vigor right up to the end. A stronger phenotype I never saw, personal quality matched to intellectual power. Everyone needs a moral compass in life and for a time in my life Ernst was exactly that, integrity, honesty, and a life based on sound moral principles — a standard to which one could turn for self-criticism and inspiration.

Continued...


An Edge Reality Club Meeting at TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design)

SCIENCE AT THE EDGE: REBOOTING BIOLOGY
Three of the World's Leading Scientists Ask Each Other the Questions They are Asking Themselves

Panelists: Rodney Brooks , Ray Kurzweil, J. Craig Venter
Moderator: John Brockman


 
 
Rodney Brooks
Ray Kurzweil
Craig Venter

"Everything is up for grabs. Everything will change. There is a magnificent sweep of intellectual landscape right in front of us."

~~~

Last year's Edge-TED event was a great success. In "What's New In The Universe", physicists Alan Guth, Paul Steinhardt, and Leonard Susskind, electrified the audience and energized each other with their well-argued arguments setting forth their theories.

This year we explore the intersection of computation and biology. One aspect of our culture that is no longer open to question is that the most significant developments in the sciences today (i.e. those that affect the lives of everybody on the planet) are about, informed by, or implemented through advances in software and computation. In no other field is this as evident as in the biology. In this Edge event, three of the world's leading scientists ask each other the questions they are asking themselves.


YOU CAN'T BE A SWEET CUCUMBER IN A VINEGAR BARREL
A Talk with Philip Zimbardo


Philip Zimbardo Edge Video Broadband | Modem

When you put that set of horrendous work conditions and external factors together, it creates an evil barrel. You could put virtually anybody in it and you're going to get this kind of evil behavior. The Pentagon and the military say that the Abu Ghraib scandal is the result of a few bad apples in an otherwise good barrel. That's the dispositional analysis. The social psychologist in me, and the consensus among many of my colleagues in experimental social psychology, says that's the wrong analysis. It's not the bad apples, it's the bad barrels that corrupt good people. Understanding the abuses at this Iraqi prison starts with an analysis of both the situational and systematic forces operating on those soldiers working the night shift in that 'little shop of horrors.'



January 16 Domenica
EDGE QUESTION FORUM
Curated by Armando Massarenti

In a front-page article, Il Sole 24 Ore, Italy's largest financial daily, announced the "Edge Question Forum" in "Domenica", the weekend Arts & Culture section. The Forum, an ongoing project designed to bring third culture thinking to Italy, features excerpts from the Edge responses in addition to articles solicited rom Italian humanist intellectuals and scientists. [click here]


" Big, deep and ambitious questions....breathtaking in scope. Keep watching The World Question Center." — New Scientist

"Fantastically stimulating...Once you start, you can't stop thinking about that question." — BBC Radio 4

The 2005 Edge Annual Question...

"WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE IS TRUE EVEN THOUGH YOU CANNOT PROVE IT?"


Great minds can sometimes guess the truth before they have either the evidence or arguments for it (Diderot called it having the "esprit de divination"). What do you believe is true even though you cannot prove it?

(120 contributors; 60,000 words:) Howard Gardner • Nicholas Humphrey • Marc D. Hauser • Daniel Gilbert • George Dyson • Daniel C. Dennett • William Calvin • Lawrence Krauss • Neil Gershenfeld • Joseph LeDoux • Stephen Kosslyn • Philip W. Anderson • Kevin Kelly • Paul Davies • Haim Harari • Janna Levin • Steven Pinker • Alison Gopnik • Martin E. P. Seligman • John McWhorter • Freeman Dyson • Robert Sapolsky • Leonard Susskind • Keith Devlin • Susan Blackmore • Clifford Pickover • Piet Hut • Gino Segre • Roger Schank • Alan Kay • Bruce Sterling • Judith Rich Harris • Arnold Trehub • Gregory Benford • Lynn Margulis • Sam Harris • Elizabeth Spelke • Kai Krause • Todd Feinberg • Nassim Nicholas Taleb • Irene Pepperberg • Jesse Bering • Scott Atran • Karl Sabbagh • Gary Marcus • Stuart A. Kauffman • Ray Kurzweil • John Barrow • Jaron Lanier • Alex Pentland • Richard Dawkins • Jean Paul Schmetz • Thomas Metzinger • John R. Skoyles • John Horgan • David Gelernter • Jordan Pollack • Lee Smolin • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi • Jeffrey Epstein • Michael Shermer • Leon Lederman • Tom Standage • Simon Baron-Cohen • Stephen Petranek • J. Craig Venter • Maria Spiropulu • David Buss • Esther Dyson • David Myers • Denis Dutton • Donald Hoffman • Kenneth Ford • Margaret Wertheim • Alun Anderson • Philip Zimbardo • Paul Bloom • Robert Provine • W. Daniel Hillis • Martin Nowak • Seth Lloyd • Donald I. Williamson • Jonathan Haidt • Rebecca Goldstein • Ned Block • Christine Finn • Rupert Sheldrake • Rudy Rucker • Douglas Rushkoff • Verena Huber-Dyson • Chris W. Anderson • Charles Simonyi • Carolyn Porco • Martin Rees • Pamela McCorduck • James O'Donnell • John McCarthy • Carlo Rovelli • Leo Chalupa • Howard Rheingold • Steve Giddings • Tor Nørretranders • Stanislas Deheane • Benoit Mandelbrot • Ellen Winner • Paul Steinhardt • Oliver Morton • Alexander Vilenkin • Terrence Sejnowski • Brian Goodwin • Stephen H. Schneider • Randolph Nesse • Timothy Taylor • Marti Hearst • Daniel Goleman • Jared Diamond • Anton Zeilinger • Ian Wilmut • Robert Trivers • Ian McEwan [click here for responses]

This year's Edge Question was suggested by Nicholas Humphrey.


Bangladesh
SATURDAY FEATURE
Where reasoning loses its power
by Syed Fattahul Alim
Saturday, January 15


Moralists merely wail, but science gives us answers

By Minnette Minette Marrin
Comment — Sunday, January 9


Broadcasting House

Sunday, January 9. 0900-1000

"Fantastically stimulating...Once you start, you can't stop thinking about that question." — Broadcasting House, BBC Radio 4


Scientists dream too - imagine that
Opinion —2005-01-08
by Julia Baird


January 6, 2003 SOCIETA ' E CULTURA; Pg. 23
Singolare inchiesta in usa di un sito internet. Ha chiesto ai signori della ricerca di svelare i loro "atti di fede". Sono arrivate le risposte piu' imprevedibili i fantasmi dello scienziato: non ho prove ma ci credo.
By Sindici Fabio


The Guardian Friday G2Inside Story
FAITH V FACT
07.01.05 — pp 6-7


SCIENCE'S SCOURGE OF BELIEVERS DECLARES HIS FAITH IN DARWIN
By Roger Highfield, Science Editor

(Filed: 05/01/2005)



ARTICLES OF NOTE

What do you believe to be true, even though you can’t prove it? John Brockman asked over a hundred scientists and intellectuals... more» ... Edge


SPACE WITHOUT TIME, TIME WITHOUT REST
John Brockman's Question for the Republic of Wisdom

(Woran glauben Sie, ohne es beweisen zu können?)
By Christian Schwägerl, January 4, 2005


GOD (OR NOT), PHYSICS AND, OF COURSE, LOVE: SCIENTISTS TAKE A LEAP
Fourteen scientists ponder everything from string theory to true love.

|
(dall'inserto culturale del Sole 24 Ore - domenica 2 gennaio 2005)
January 2, 2005

Fate largo alle «beautiful minds»
di Roberto Casati

La terza cultura di John Brockman
di Armando Massarenti


 




New Image for The New Year

KATINKA MATSON is cofounder and resident artist of Edge.


EDGE IN THE NEWS

"The greatest virtual research university in the world."
— Denis Dutton, Editor, Arts & Letters Daily


"A stellar cast of thinkers tackles the really big questions facing scientists."
— by Paul Nettleton,The Guardian




"It is like having a front-row seat at the ultimate scientific seminar series."
— Matin Durani (Deputy Editor, Physics World)


A THEORY OF ROUGHNESS
A Talk with Benoit Mandelbrot

A recent, important turn in my life occurred when I realized that something that I have long been stating in footnotes should be put on the marquee. I have engaged myself, without realizing it, in undertaking a theory of roughness. Think of color, pitch, loudness, heaviness, and hotness. Each is the topic of a branch of physics. Chemistry is filled with acids, sugars, and alcohols — all are concepts derived from sensory perceptions. Roughness is just as important as all those other raw sensations, but was not studied for its own sake.


INDIRECT RECIPROCITY, ASSESSMENT HARDWIRING, AND REPUTATION
A Talk with Karl Sigmund

Karl Sigmund in front of Albertina Platz, Vienna

These ideas fed into our work on indirect reciprocity, a concept that was first introduced by Robert Trivers in a famous paper in the 1970s. I recall that he mentioned this idea obliquely when he wrote about something he called "general altruism". Here you give something back not to the person to whom you owe something, but to somebody else in society. He pointed out that this also works with regard to cooperation at a high level. Trivers didn't go into details, because at the time it was not really at the center of his thinking. He was mostly interested in animal behavior, and so far indirect reciprocity has not been proven to exist in animal behavior. It might exist in some cases, but ethologists are still debating the pros and cons.

In human societies, however, indirect reciprocity has a very striking effect. There is a famous anecdote about the American baseball player Yogi Berra, who said something to the effect of, "I make a point of going to other people's funerals because otherwise they won't come to mine." This is not as nonsensical as it seems. If a colleague of the university, for instance, goes faithfully to every faculty member's funeral, then the faculty will turn out strongly at his. Others reciprocate. It works. We think instinctively in terms of direct reciprocation — when I do something for you, you do something for me — but the same principle can apply in situations of indirect reciprocity. I do something for you and somebody else helps me in return.


GREGORY BATESON: THE CENTENNIAL
1904 — 2004

ABOUT BATESON
by John Brockman with an Afterword by Gregory Bateson

Bateson contended that as a result of advances in cybernetics and fundamental mathematics, many other areas of thought have shifted. In The Evolutionary Idea, a proposed new book, he planned to gather together those new advances to present an alternative to then current orthodox theories of evolution. This alternative view was to stress the role of information, that is, of mind, in all levels of biology from genetics to ecology and from human culture to the pathology of schizophrenia. In place of natural selection of organisms, Bateson considered the survival of patterns, ideas, and forms of interaction.

"Any descriptive proposition," he said, "which remains true longer will out-survive other propositions which do not survive so long. This switch from the survival of the creatures to the survival of ideas which are immanent in the creatures (in their anatomical forms and in their interrelationships) gives a totally new slant to evolutionary ethics and philosophy. Adaptation, purpose, homology, somatic change, and mutation all take on new meaning with this shift in theory."


Katinka Matson, Edge's cofounder and resident artist, has just returned from a visit to the Genoa Science Festival, where her exhibition of "scanner photography" at Palazzo Rosso continues through November 28th. (I was along for the ride).

I am pleased to report that the Festival della Scienza — 2004 was vibrant, new, and exciting, making interesting use of the ancient city of Genoa as a backdrop to a moveable feast of lectures, panels, exhibitions, and performances. Based on numbers alone, the attendance was close to 150,000 visitors, a dramatic increase over the first year.

Part of the Festival's charm was the use of a mixture of the old city of Genoa and the reconstructed areas as venues for the programs. Katinka's exhibition is mounted in Palazzo Rosso, a 16th century palace now converted into a leading European museum which house works by many of Italy's most distinguished artists. The Palazzo is an exquisite building on via Garibaldi, a street of palazzos built on top of each other during a ten year period in the 16th century. It's an astonishing vista. There's nothing else like it in the world. Other events were held in ancient churches, in civil buildings, etc. Many of the events, convened at the modern Genoa waterfront, cold only be accessed by walking through the old town, one of the most ancient parts of Europe.

Every night the guests of the festival were invited to a dinner hosted by a local family who opened the doors of their palazzo for the visitors, and unlike other festivals, which convene for a short period with everyone in attendance together, the Genoa Science Festival takes place over a two week period with the participants coming in for 2 to 3 day stays. While we were there, the company could hardly have been better as our companions at lunches and dinners included such notables as Lynn Margulis, Niles Eldredge, Patrick Bateson, Carl Djerassi, John Barrow, and Luca Cvalli-Sforza, to name but a few. Ever present, and seemingly inexhaustible, was the Festival Director, Vittorio Bo, the former CEO of the distinguished Italian book publisher, Einaudi.

Bo did a great job. Everything was professionally organized, and executed. There was a national buzz and wide coverage in the Italian press (For intance, Katinka's exhibit has received coverage in many major dailies such as La Stampa as well as the largest Italian magazine, Panorama.)

While America has various conferences, academic and commercial, we have nothing like Festival della Scienza. Perhaps there should be. The question of venue is critical and hopefully it could be in a place that's more of a destination, where people will stay and hang out, rather than a metropolis such as New York (although if I were the Mayor, I would go for a Science Festival over the Olympics any day).

In the meantime, Vittorio Bo has asked, and Edge has agreed, to attempt some kind of collaboration at next year's Genoa Festival in which Edge plays a role in programming an "Edge" series of events. (Jared Diamond, who has been studying Italian for the past three years, has already signed on.) Any other takers? Ideas? Suggestions?

— JB


"FLOWERS": KATINKA MATSON EXHIBITION AT PALAZZO ROSSO, GENOA


Katinka Matson in front of Palazzo Rosso
, Via Garibaldi, Genoa

KATINKA MATSON co-founder and resident artist of Edge. Her art work is online at katinkamatson.com.


ROBERT TRIVERS: An Edge Special Event — Co-hosted by The Program for Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard University, Martin Nowak, Director

"For the last ten or fifteen years, I've been trying to understand situations in nature in which the genes within a single individual are in disagreement—or put differently, in which genes within an individual are selected in conflicting directions. It's an enormous topic, which 20 years ago looked like a shadow on the horizon, just as about a hundred years ago what later became relativity theory was just two little shadows on the horizon of physics, and blew up to become major developments. In genetics it's fair to say that about 20 years ago a cloud on the horizon was our knowledge that there were so-called selfish genetic elements in various species that propagated themselves at the expense of the larger organism. What was then just a cloud on the horizon is now a full-force storm with gale winds blowing."

A FULL-FORCE STORM WITH GALE WINDS BLOWING
A Talk with Robert Trivers


Robert Trivers Edge Video Broadband | Modem

For the past several years Edge has hosted an annual end-of-summer event. As a departure, this year's event was organized around the work of one person: the legendary Robert Trivers. It was held in Cambridge, on September 7-8 at The Program for Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard University.

The event began with a reception and dinner on September 7th. The following day featured five talks: Robert Trivers began the program with a talk on "New Work on Selfish Genetic Elements", and ended the proceedings with his long-standing ideas on "Deceit and Self-Deception". J. Craig Venter spoke about "Ocean Genomics"; Seth Lloyd on "The Computational Universe"; and Martin Nowak on "The Evolution of Cooperation."

Participants included: Daniel C. Dennett, Alan Dershowitz, Jeffrey Epstein, Nancy Etcoff, Peter Galison, Daniel Gilbert, Alan Guth Marc D. Hauser, Seth Lloyd, Marvin Minsky, Andrew Murray, Martin Nowak, Steven Pinker, Lisa Randall, Lee Smolin, Liz Spelke, Lawrence Summers, Robert Trivers, J. Craig Venter, Dan Wegner, E.O. Wilson.

This online presentation is a reprise of the live program in Cambridge with an added introduction, comments on the work of Trivers by Steven Pinker, and a talk with Trivers in July which inspired the program. Edge plans to publish the edited talks, video clips, and discussions over the next few months along with Reality Club discussions among speakers, participants, and the wider Edge community.


Original essays by Edge contributors...

"Good, narrative history, combined with much fine writing...quirky, absorbing and persuasive in just the way that good stories are."—Nature • "Some of the biggest brains in the world turn their lenses on their own lives...fascinating...an invigorating debate."—Washington Post • "Compelling."—Discover• " An engrossing treat of a book...crammed with hugely enjoyable anecdotes ...you'll have a wonderful time reading these reminiscences."—New Scientist •• "An intriguing collection of essays detailing the childhood experiences of prominent scientists and the life events that sparked their hunger for knowledge. Full of comical and thought-provoking stories."—Globe & Mail •• "An inspiring collection of 27 essays by leading scientists about the childhood moments that set them on their shining paths."—Psychology Today
Curious Minds:
How a Child Becomes a Scientist
(US)
 
When We Were Kids:
How a Child Becomes a Scientist (UK)


The best of Edge, now available in print...

"A stellar cast of thinkers tackles the really big questions facing scientists." — The Guardian • "A compact, if bumpy, tour through the minds of some of the world's preeminent players in science and technology." — Philadelphia Inquirer • "[Brockman] wisely exits the stage after a brief monologue and turns the rest of the show over to his guests. What a show they put on!"— San Jose Mercury News
The New Humanists:
Science at the Edge
(US)
 
Science at the Edge (UK)

 

John Brockman, Editor and Publisher
Russell Weinberger, Associate Publisher

contact: editor@edge.org
Copyright © 2005 by
Edge Foundation, Inc
All Rights Reserved.

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