The page below has been taken from: http://lacounty.info/seal.htm
It is reproduced here, because it will soon disappear from the LA County web site.

According to a June 2, 2004 AP story:

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Los Angeles County supervisors say they will remove a tiny cross from the county's official seal.

The decision comes after the American Civil Liberties Union threatened to file a lawsuit if the county didn't remove the cross.

The ACLU claimed the seal was unconstitutional because it reflects an endorsement of Christianity by the county government.

The Board of Supervisors held an emotional debate yesterday before deciding to replace the cross with another image -- possibly a representation of a Spanish mission or California's indigenous tribes. The cross has been on the county seal since 1957.


COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES OFFICIAL SEAL

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The Goddess Pomona – the goddess of gardens and fruit trees – is holding in her arms a sheaf of grain, an orange, a lemon, an avocado and a few grapes to represent Los Angeles County’s agriculture.

She stands on the shore of the Pacific Ocean with the San Gabriel Mountains in the background.

The engineering instruments – the triangle and the caliper – relate to the industrial construction complex of the County and Los Angeles’ vital contribution to the conquest of space.

The Spanish galleon is the San Salvador, which Cabrillo sailed into San Pedro Harbor on October 8, 1542.

The tuna represents the fishing industry of Los Angeles County, and the championship cow, Pearlette, represents the dairy industry.

The Hollywood Bowl indicates the cultural activities, while the two stars represent the County’s motion picture and television industries.

The cross represents the influence of the church and the missions of California.

Oil derricks are symbolic of the oil fields that were discovered on Signal Hill.

The words “County of Los Angeles California” surround the seal.

(The County seal was designed by former Supervisor Kenneth Hahn, drawn by Millard Sheets and adopted by the Board of Supervisors March 1, 1957.)

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