28 Feb 2005


The Wrath Of God

There’s a good piece by Iain S Bruce in Scotland’s Sunday Herald on Christian Voice and some of the other fringe groups.

The Christian voice is becoming more strident, more vocal and more in-your-face. Next month the evangelical MediaMarch organisation will descend upon Downing Street to hand over a 120,000-signature petition dem anding tougher media obscenity laws, and as the year rolls on, theologically inspired acti vism is set to become a familiar rumble rolling through the corridors of power.
[…]
Britain is waking up to a new breed of faith that seems a million miles from the traditional forms of religious expression in this country. No longer content to remain in society’s shadows, they are stepping out into the light, armed with a reinvigorated brand of militant faith and a fundamentalist agenda on which they insist there will be no compromise. Radical, committed and apparently no longer prepared to turn the other cheek, they have presented the nation’s policy makers with an unexpected new challenge, and from Holyrood to the House of Commons apparatchiks have been sent scurrying to identify who these people are and exactly what it is that they want.

I hadn’t heard of MediaMarch before, but they look like they occupy the part on the Venn diagram where Mediawatch and Christian Voice intersect. In their own words: “Strong and clearly defined obscenity laws are urgently needed for the sake of the emotional, physical and social health of our nation.” Interestingly, they do seem to be reaching out to Muslims, but in a rather bizarre way - they have one phone number for ‘Christians and others’ and a separate one for Muslims. They also seem -similar to CV - to have recently reached a boiling point that’s made them more active in their campaigning:

Now in 2004, OFCOM (the new ‘umbrella’ media regulatory body) has made it clear that, whatever the regulations finally decided on for its own Content Standards code, the ‘good taste and decency’ principle has been abandoned by them already. Verbal and written representations at all levels will continue to be made by mediamarch. However, this situation is now so grave that we all have no alternative but to heighten the level of public protest at every possible opportunity.

Back to the Bruce article and he raises an interesting fact that’d it be interesting to know the source of:

What is clear, however, is that these groups represent a political foe to be reckoned with. Attracting members from both the established mainstream church and congregations from the far fringes of the Christian faith, these self-funding organisations are believed to have total backing worth in excess of £20 million a year and are rapidly turning themselves into highly organised and zealously committed campaigning machines.

(Emphasis added) Where is all this money coming from? OK, Bruce might be misinformed, or it might be a typo, but these groups are getting money from somewhere, and looking at the pictures we’ve seen of CV protests and MediaMarch’s own publicity shots, none of these groups seem to have a large enough membership to raise the money they seem to have.

See Bruce’s other article on this for some interesting quotes as well, notably Miranda Suit (a name that, in other circumstance, would sound as though Chris Morris had created her) of MediaMarch:

“There is righteous anger out there. The good people in this country have been completely ignored for too many years, and that is going to change by hook or by crook,” said MediaMarch founder Miranda Suit.

“We want to see the birth of a British Bible Belt to provide this country with the firm moral guidance it so clearly needs.”


Nick got away with this at 12:52 am

4 Comments »

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  1. It would be cynical of me to suggest that money was coming from the US, but that’s precisely what I think. Take a look at the blossoming of US God Channels on satellite, plus radio stations that wouldn’t have a hope with UK-only funding. I remember working for a radio station 10 years ago, and being approached by a US Media Group wanting to “buy” 15 minutes of airtime at 5.45am on Sunday mornings. Their offer for this airtime? $250,000 per year. They subsequently solved the problem of not being allowed to buy this airtime by buying another UK radio station. Unfortunately for them, they didn’t read the small print too carefully as there was only 2 years to run on the franchise, and they lost the licence to an Asian radio group.

    My point is there are a lot of very rich US-based media groups with plenty of money to “invest” in converting heathens.

    Comment by Dan — 28 Feb 2005 @ 12:11 pm

  2. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4303965.stm

    Comment by Will — 28 Feb 2005 @ 1:44 pm

  3. The upping of activity among mediamarch and christianvoice is partly the direct result of ofcom abandoning a concern for taste and decency. This is the inevitable equal and opposite reaction to that action.

    Comment by Christopher Shell — 02 Mar 2005 @ 5:53 pm

  4. We live in a country which has lost all sense of morality and thus the backlash from groups such as Christian Voice and mediamarch is inevitable, crucial and neccessary if our society is to find its way out of this moral cesspit.

    Comment by Denise Pfeiffer — 03 Apr 2005 @ 10:31 pm

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