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Kenneth G. Wilson (1923–).  The Columbia Guide to Standard American English.  1993.
 
burlesque, caricature, farce, lampoon, parody, travesty (nn.)
 
 
A burlesque is a play or other literary piece that elevates the mundane or reduces and ridicules the noble for purposes of making people laugh. The American burlesque show presented bawdy comedy, skits, and striptease acts, making gross fun of human behavior. Caricature is the humorous exaggeration in pictures or words of people, places, or events, as in political cartoons. A farce is a comedy filled with wit, lively and unlikely social situations, and exaggerated language. A lampoon is a harsh satire, designed to ridicule someone or something. A parody is a piece of music or literature in which another work is imitated for humorous purpose or ridiculed through exaggeration or distorted imitation. A travesty is a gross distortion of an original work, exaggerated for comic purposes or with intent to ridicule.  1
 
 
The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. Copyright © 1993 Columbia University Press.

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