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Outreach: K-12 and Community

Holidays and Celebrations

Books
The Latino Holiday Book: From Cinco de Mayo to Día de los Muertos ­ the Celebrations and Traditions of Hispanic-Americans
Valerie Menard. Marlowe & Company, NY, 2000. 174 pp.
The essential resource for learning about the special traditions and celebrations of Hispanic-Americans. Author Valerie Menard takes us through the full year, covering new year’s traditions, Día de los Reyes, Calle Ocho, Easter, Cinco de Mayo, the feast of San Juan Bautista, the Cuban and Mexican celebrations of independence, National Puerto Rican Day, the feast of Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre and Our Lady of the Divine Inspiration, Día de la Raza, Día de los Muertos, the feast day of the Virgin of Guadalupe and Christmas. Weddings, birthdays, and quinceañearas are also explored.
Recommendation: For background on teaching Latin celebrations at all levels.
Children's Literature
Carlos, Light the Farolito
Jean Ciavonne, illustrated by Donna Clair. Clarion Books, New York, 1995. 28 pp.
The story of a young Mexican boy and his family's celebration of Las Posadas, a community dramatization of the birth of Christ. A lovely Mexican Christmas story. Written by a former Texas teacher.
Recommendation: : Ideal reading for elementary school children (grades 2 and up), good example of foreign customs for older grades.

Festivals of the World: Chile
Gareth Stevens Publishing, Milwaukee,WI, 1998. 32 pp.
A bright and delightful book introducing Chile, its festival calendar, and its specific festival rituals. Lots of color photography. Craft projects to make traditional Andean musical instruments and an arpillera, a type of cloth picture. Also includes a recipe for milk with bananas.
Recommendation: Grades 1-4.

Festivals of the World: Mexico
Gareth Stevens Publishing, Milwaukee,WI, 1997. 32 pp.
A bright and delightful book introducing Mexico, its festival calendar, and its specific festival rituals. Lots of color photography. Craft project to make an Aztec shield. Also includes a recipe for guacamole.
Recommendation: Grades 1-4.

Festivals of the World: Peru
Gareth Stevens Publishing, Milwaukee,WI, 1998. 32 pp.
A bright and delightful book introducing Peru, its festival calendar, and its specific festival rituals. Lots of color photography. Craft project to make a sun god mask. Also includes a recipe for natilla, or caramel sauce.
Recommendation: Grades 1-4.

Fiesta!; Mexico1s Great Celebrations
Elizabeth Silverthorne. The Millbrook Press, Brookfield, CT, 1992. 64 pp.
A book introducing religious, patriotic and other kinds of fiestas in Mexico. Includes colorful drawings, as well as recipes and craft projects for kids.
Recommendation: Grades 3-6.

The Piñata Maker / El Piñatero
George Ancona. Harcourt Brace, New York, 1994. English and Spanish. 36 pp.
Tells the story of a craftsman in Oaxaca who makes piñatas. Photographs show the process of making these lovely and unusual piñatas.
Recommendation: Ideal reading for elementary school children, good example of local customs for older grades.

Tonight Is Carnaval
Arthur Dorros. Puffin Unicorn Books, Penguin Books, USA Inc., New York, 1991. 24 pp.
Story illustrated with photographs of lovely arpilleras (wall hangings of fabric that tell a story) created by the Club de Madres Virgen del Carmen of Lima, Peru.
Recommendation: Grades 1-4.
Curriculum Guides/Lesson Plans/Classroom Activities
Making Magic Windows
Carmen Lomas Garza, Children's Book Press, San Francisco, CA, 1999. 61 pp.
This workbook introduces children to the traditional Mexican craft of papel picado. This book shows, step by step, how to create beautiful designs and banners by simply folding and cutting tissue paper. Several designs are included, as well as a section for more advanced students.
Recommendation: Elementary school.
Videos
Cinco de Mayo
Schlessinger Video Productions, Bala Cynwyd, PA, 1994. 30 minutes.
This video investigates Cinco de Mayo's history and observes preparations being made to make the occasion festive., highlighted by the spirited sounds of a traditional Mexican mariachi band. Children will also hear Mexican folk songs, learn about the Maya myth of creation, and make their own maracas from small cans.
Recommendation: Grades K-4.

The Day of the Dead
Carlex Company, Rochester, MI, 1992. 32 minutes.
This acclaimed video takes viewers through the preparations for and observance of the holiday with a Mexican family.
Recommendation: Elementary school through middle school.

El Dia de los Muertos en Tlaxcala
Mirada, Inc, Valley City, ND, 1996. 43 minutes each.
2 volumes, each with teacher packets:
  • Volume I has a brief introduction to the Day of the Dead and then the story runs once with the voice-over in English and a second time in present tense Spanish.
  • Volume II has a brief introduction to the Day of the Dead and the voice-over is in past tense Spanish. The first time, the story is told with the text on the screen. Preterit and imperfect verbs are highlighted. The second time, the story is told without the text.
Recommendation: Intermediate Spanish classes.

Food for the Ancestors; The Mexican Celebration of the Days of the Dead
PBS Home Video, 1999. 60 minutes.
The program focuses on the special foods that are made for this time of the year: Sugar Skull candies, pulque, Bread of the Dead, and Mole Poblano, and more. The program also chronicles the various rituals involved in Day of the Dead celebrations. A lovely video with a focus on fascinating foods and recipes.
Recommendation: Grades 5-12.


To reserve items, please fill out and return the Lending Agreement. You may return it by mail or fax. Note: If you are unable to download Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files, please contact Outreach for a Lending Agreement.

Once you have a Lending Agreement on file, please contact the LLILAS Outreach Office with your request (including dates needed):

Natalie Arsenault
Outreach Coordinator
Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
University of Texas at Austin
1 University Station D0800
Austin, Texas 78712-0331
Phone (512) 232-2404 or 471-5551
Fax (512) 471-3090
e-mail: n.arsenault@mail.utexas.edu



8 July 04
The Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies
in The College of Liberal Arts at UT Austin
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