ARCO Gas - Fill SmartARCO Gas - Fill Smart.


Check below for answers to some of our most frequently asked questions.

Are there ARCO stations throughout the United States?
Why doesn't ARCO stations accept credit cards?
Why is there a $0.35 charge for the use of PayQuick®?
Why is ARCO gasoline usually less expensive than other brands?
Is ARCO gas the same quality as other gasolines?
Will ARCO gas enhance the performance of my car?
What do different octanes mean?
How do I know what octane is right for my car?
Do premium grades of gasoline really keep your car performing better?
Are over-the-counter fuel-additive treatments beneficial to my car's performance?
What is oxygenated fuel?
What is MTBE and how does it affect me?
What is being done at ARCO facilities to help minimize diesel-fuel emissions?
What is BP doing to reduce emissions and save energy at ARCO stations?
Will ethanol in ARCO-branded gasoline change my car's performance?
How will ARCO gasoline with ethanol perform in my car?
What about using ethanol-blended gasoline in smaller engines, motorcycles, snowmobiles and boats?
Can I use ARCO's ethanol-blended gasoline in my small aircraft?
Can I use ARCO gasoline blended with ethanol in my antique car?
Does use of ARCO gasoline with ethanol improve air quality by reducing emissions?
I have more questions about ARCO gasoline. Where can I get more information?
How is ARCO affiliated with BP?
How can I find out about career opportunities with BP, the company that owns the ARCO brand?
What is "Flex Your Power at the Pump?"

Are there ARCO stations throughout the United States?
Currently, ARCO gasoline stations are only located in six western states-Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington and Utah. If you are planning to visit any of these states or want to find the closest ARCO station in your area, check the Station Locator section of our site or click on the underlined link.

Why don't ARCO stations accept credit cards?
We do not accept credit cards because in doing so, we would incur additional fees of as much as three cents per gallon on a typical credit-card purchase. As most of our customers pay with cash, we decided to no longer accept credit cards as part of our strategy to sell high-quality gasoline at the lowest possible price.

Why is there a $0.35 charge for the use of PayQuick®?
In an effort to balance the customer's need for convenience and value, PayQuick terminals are available on our islands. PayQuick is an easy way for customers to pay for their gas using cash, debit cards, PumpPass or GasPRO Plus Cards. There is a $0.35 processing fee for debit cards only, in addition to any fees your bank may charge for this service. For all other transactions there are no additional fees. This allows our customers the flexibility of using a debit card.

Why is ARCO gasoline usually less expensive than other brands?
For many years, Atlantic Richfield and now BP West Coast Products, the company that owns the ARCO brand, have had a unique business approach. Among major gasoline brands we're known as a "high-volume, low-cost producer." More simply stated, the more efficient the company is, the more our customers save. And since we sell nearly twice as much gas at the average ARCO station, our customers often save as much as six to seven cents per gallon on average compared to other major brands.

Is ARCO gas the same quality as other gasolines?
Yes. ARCO gasoline stations, we sell only high-quality gas. To guarantee that, we regularly test our gasolines and conduct quality surveys in all our regions. In addition, we also subscribe to several independent gas surveys, which are taken in each district. Not surprisingly, in every test, ARCO gasoline rates just as high, if not higher, than all the other major brands on key performance specifications.

Will ARCO gas enhance the performance of my car?
Yes. Our detergent additive, known as CleanTech, works to eliminate engine deposits that clog the flow of gas. CleanTech also helps make your vehicle run smoother, which results in less "pinging." In fact, CleanTech works so well it exceeds the requirements of the BMW unlimited-mileage warranty test, which is the performance standard adopted by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM).

What do different octanes mean?
Different gasolines are rated on their ability to resist knocking. The actual octane number is a measurement that gauges the gasoline's ability to resist knocking. Higher octane levels indicate anti-knock potential. In most cases, light pinging or knocking will not cause power loss or severe harm to vehicles. However, heavy or prolonged knocking may cause engine damage and should be checked by an automobile mechanic.

How do I know what octane is right for my car?
Check your vehicle owner's manual for the manufacturer's recommended octane rating. Unfortunately, the manufacturer's recommended fuel octane level does not always guarantee that a vehicle will perform absolutely knock-free. Due to normal production variations, there can be noticeable differences among engines, even of the same make and model. If your vehicle experiences heavy knocking while using fuel at, or above, the recommend octane level, we suggest you have your vehicle serviced.

Do premium grades of gasoline really keep your car performing better?
Your vehicle should perform at its best when the appropriate level of octane is being used for the engine in which it is being combusted. There is no benefit to using gasoline of a higher octane than the engine requires to perform knock-free.

Are over-the-counter fuel-additive treatments beneficial to my car's performance?
If you use high-quality gasoline, such as ARCO, there's generally no need to use additional additives in your vehicle. All ARCO gas products contain CleanTech, a detergent and deposit-control additive that works to keep your car clean and running smoothly. Under normal driving conditions, there should be no need to use additional fuel-additive treatments. If you do choose to use performance additives, we recommend that you first check your vehicle owner's manual for manufacturer recommendations.

What is oxygenated fuel?
Oxygenated fuel is gasoline blended with oxygenates like ethanol and MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether). What that means is that the gas contains more oxygen so it burns cleaner, significantly reducing auto-exhaust emissions, particularly carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons in older-model vehicles. Newer-model vehicles have sophisticated engine-control systems that minimize the benefit of having more oxygen in gasoline. In addition, refiners can make other changes to the composition of gasoline that achieve similar emission reductions without the use of oxygenates. Currently, federal regulations require oil companies to produce and sell oxygenated fuel year-round in many major cities in the U.S. State regulations also require oxygenated fuel in the winter for cities that have carbon-monoxide problems.

What is MTBE and how does it affect me?
MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) is an additive that has been used in production of all grades of California gasoline. Oil refiners have used MTBE as a cleaner-burning additive to meet the emissions standards of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It has been in use for over 20 years but is scheduled for phase-out in California by December 31, 2003 due to public concerns about MTBE's potential impacts on groundwater, including taste and odor. Although there is scattered debate about the impact of MTBE, BPWCP, as refiners and marketers of gasoline under the ARCO brand name, started the phase-out of MTBE in early January 2003. By March 2003, all California ARCO branded stations will be MTBE-free — nearly a year ahead of the MTBE phase-out deadline.

What is being done at ARCO facilities to help minimize diesel-fuel emissions?
BPWCP is helping curb diesel-vehicle emissions with the introduction of an environmentally superior low-sulfur diesel fuel called ARCO ECD-1. This fuel is now available at most California ARCO-branded stations that sell diesel fuel. Use of ECD-1 alone helps reduce sulfur-dioxide emissions by ~90% and total particulate-matter emissions by approximately 10% to 15% compared to conventional diesel fuel. ECD-1 enables the use of advanced exhaust after-treatment devices on diesel vehicles, much like unleaded gasoline did for automobiles. Both CARB and EPA have verified catalyzed-particulate traps for use with ultra-low-sulfur diesel fuels, like ECD-1, that reduce particulate matter, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions by more than 90%. Tests also demonstrate that the use of ECD-1 and catalyzed-particulate traps significantly reduces the toxic risk from diesel exhaust by dramatically lowering levels of known toxics such as Benzene. This places diesel-vehicle levels of these pollutants at or below the same low levels as compressed-natural-gas (CNG) vehicles.

For more information on BPWCP's ECD-1 diesel technology, click here.

What is BP doing to reduce emissions and save energy at ARCO stations?
Most recently, BP has introduced two new grades of fuel that effectively lower emissions. Our new Lower Sulfur ARCO Premium Gasoline is currently offered in the Pacific Northwest and with a sulfur content of less than 30 parts per million, it helps to reduce dangerous nitrous-oxide emissions. Extending our ongoing efforts, BP plans to introduce ECD-1, Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel to California retail sites that currently offer diesel. Conserving energy can only help our communities and our environment. In addition to low-sulfur fuels, some ARCO stations in California are solar-powered. The solar modules will generate more than 10% of the electricity required during peak sun hours, thus reducing emissions and lessening the power drain during peak-usage times. We're doing everything we can to have a positive impact on the world we all live in.

Will ethanol in ARCO-branded gasoline change my car's performance?
BP's oxygenate choices in ARCO-branded gasoline reflect our commitment to gasoline quality. Tests by BP and others show that use of ethanol should not harm the engines and fuel systems of modern vehicles.

How will ARCO gasoline with ethanol perform in my car?
Ethanol-blended ARCO gasoline should perform in engines similar to the way our previous gasolines did. With any oxygenated gasoline, there will likely be a slight reduction in performed fuel economy by approximately one to three percent.

What about using ethanol-blended gasoline in smaller engines, motorcycles, snowmobiles and boats?
You should consult your Owner's Manual and/or the engine manufacturer. If the Owner's Manual prohibits the use of ethanol blends, consult with the manufacturer for the latest information.

Can I use ARCO's ethanol-blended gasoline in my small aircraft?
No automotive gasoline can be used for refueling aircraft. However, some pilots and aircraft owners have obtained FAA certificates to use motor gasoline for their aircraft. Currently, the FAA prohibits the use of ethanol blends for this application.

Can I use ARCO gasoline blended with ethanol in my antique car?
Most cars' fuel systems with either fuel injectors or carburetors manufactured since the early 1980s were made with materials designed to tolerate oxygenates including ethanol. Therefore, most modern cars should run just fine on ethanol-blended gasoline.

For antique cars, owners should consult with the manufacturers for compatibility of ethanol blends with antique engine parts. If ethanol blends are used, regular inspection of the fuel-delivery system by trained mechanics should be undertaken.

Does use of ARCO gasoline with ethanol improve air quality by reducing emissions?
EPA's Blue Ribbon Panel for oxygenates determined in 1999 that the use of oxygenates including ethanol has little benefit on exhaust emissions from modern cars. The reason for the lack of benefit is that modern cars already have very low emissions and modern engines control the combustion process so that the oxygenate benefit to the fuel is nil.

Ethanol has been shown to reduce carbon monoxide (CO) pollution in older (non-computer-controlled) engines. With this reduction in CO, there may be a tradeoff from using ethanol blends because of their higher emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) that contribute to ground-level ozone pollution. In addition, ethanol blends may produce higher levels of aldehydes in exhaust that also contribute to air-quality problems.

Of course, ethanol, unlike crude oil, is a domestic, renewable resource. That benefit has not been diminished.

I have more questions about ARCO gasoline. Where can I get more information?
Technical information on ARCO gasoline is available from ARCO customer relations at 1-800-322-ARCO (2726) or the ARCO Web site, www.ARCOGAS.com.

How is ARCO affiliated with BP?
Both the ARCO and ampm brands are owned by BP West Coast Products. In recent years, BP has merged with companies such as Atlantic Richfield Company, Amoco and Burmah Castrol, making it the largest U.S. gasoline retailer. As an oil and gas producer, BP has also become one of the largest in the world.

How can I find out about career opportunities with BP, the company that owns the ARCO brand?
Career opportunities at BP in the United States are posted at http://bpcareercenter.com/us/hire.htm. Instructions on how to search for jobs and submit applications are detailed on this site.

What is "Flex Your Power at the Pump?"
Launched by the State of California, "Flex Your Power at the Pump" is a statewide effort to educate and encourage people and organizations to use gasoline more efficiently—saving money and contributing to a healthy economy and environment.

This effort brings together California's residents, businesses, community organizations, institutions and local governments to take voluntary actions that help save fuel.

As part of our commitment to the community, we are taking several measures to ensure fuel-efficient operations by educating our employees on saving energy and by helping the state to educate the public. We are proud to join hundreds of participating organizations in this important campaign.

Here's what you can do:

  1. Keep your tires inflated to the recommended pressure.
  2. Use your air conditioning selectively.
  3. Observe the posted speed limits. It's safer and saves gas.
The three simple steps above can save up to 15% in fuel costs.
  1. Accelerate smoothly and brake gradually. It's safer and uses less gas.
  2. Properly maintain your vehicle and replace your air and oil filters as recommended.
  3. Minimize the amount of time your vehicle idles.
For more ways to save fuel and energy, visit www.FYPower.org.



© 2005 BP West Coast Products LLC