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Spc. Allana Crawford, a military police with 411th Military Police Company, 42nd Military Police Brigade, teaches a class on first aid to Iraq Police cadets March 24, at the Baghdad Police Academy. Spc. Allana Crawford, a military police with 411th Military Police Company, 42nd Military Police Brigade, teaches a class on first aid to Iraq Police cadets March 24, at the Baghdad Police Academy.
Spc. Mary Rose
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MPs help train Baghdad police cadets

By Spc. Mary Rose

April 5, 2005

FORWARD OPERATING BASE VOLUNTEER, Iraq (Army News Service, April 5, 2005) – Iraqi police are using the partnering program with the 42nd Military Police Brigade, Fort Lewis, Wash., to train cadets at the Baghdad Police Academy.

“We work hand-in-hand with Iraqi police instructors. They’re learning how to instruct their own people,” said Staff Sgt. Gary R. Rigsby, instructor, 411th MP Company, Fort Hood, Texas.

The Course is eight weeks long and the cadets go through many areas of training.

“Some of the classes the Iraqi cadets go through is a law week; a human rights class on how to treat personnel; a use-of-force class; a weapons training class where they learn how to use a Glock-19 as well as a an AK-47; and an (anti-terrorism) class,” Rigsby said.

The academy, with the help of MPs, is graduating about 3,000 cadets per quarter. The attrition rate is at around 10 percent, said Capt. Jeffery Withers, commander, 411th MP Co.

The Iraqi and Coalition instructors train the cadets in smaller classes to get better results, said Withers.

“We’re providing quality police officers to go out on the streets and insure that they can self-sufficiently and securely police their own country,” he said.

“We teach them the basic police skills that they need to go out and survive and secure Baghdad itself, or wherever they are stationed throughout Iraq,” Rigsby said.

“Iraqi cadets are disciplined and excited. They take and see this opportunity seriously as a great step forward. This is the first time in a long time that they will freely be able to be Iraqi Police and have a say in the democratic process,” Withers said. “They really care.”

The cadets study hard, they don’t cheat and they’re very excited to be a part of the police force so they can go out and make their country safer, Withers said.

(Editor’s note: Spc. Mary Rose serves with MNC-I PAO.)

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