5. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Director Stanley Kubrick's career was one that defied easy categorization, and he further proved it with this scathing and raucous anti-war comedy. Filmed in black and white and starring the genius Peter Sellers at the height of his powers, Dr. Strangelove is black humor at its finest, killing with laughs rather than bullets. The film openly criticizes the stupidity of war (in particular nuclear war), thanks in large part to the show-stopping performance of George C. Scott as Bud Turgidson. The fact that the film was made in 1964, right in the thick of the Cold War, is a tribute to its bravery… but it still holds up today. -CC


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4. This is Spinal Tap
A masterpiece of comedy, insight and musical lampoonery, This is Spinal Tap follows the exploits of the fictional UK rock band Spinal Tap as they tour the States in support of their latest (and perhaps last) album. Pitch-perfect in tone and song, this Rob Reiner mockumentary bears multiple viewings, if only because the raucous laughter it induces drowns out some of the subtler moments. Infinitely quotable, infectiously and outrageously true (which is the funniest part of all), it is one of the funniest films of the 80s and all-time. What's more, it crystallizes a vision of hair metal and features cameos by a young Dana Carvey, Letterman sidekick Paul Schaeffer and Billy Crystal.

What is extra-intiguing about the film is that the cast—Michael McKean, Harry Shearer (who now voices Simpsons characters and Christopher Guest (who went on to direct Best in Show and A Mighty Wind)—actually played their own instruments, and endured beyond the film, recording a follow-up album, Break Like the Wind. Standout hits from the film include "Big Bottom," "Sex Farm," "Rock n' Roll Creation" and "Stonhenge." Classic. -CC


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3. Caddyshack
Endlessly quotable, 1980's Caddyshack features Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight and Bill Murray at the top of their game. Chase plays brash new golf club member Ty Webb, who makes himself a pain to club member Judge Elihu Smails (Knight), along with equally annoying (but rich) Al Czervik (Dangerfield). Meanwhile, the course has a bit of a gopher problem, which is tackled by greenskeeper Carl Spackler (Murray). Dangerfield and Murray, both originally cast in small parts that got expanded during filming due to their constant hilarious ad-libbing, steal the show with such classic lines as "Oh, this is the worst-looking hat I ever saw. What, when you buy a hat like this I bet you get a free bowl of soup, huh? Oh, it looks good on you though."; "So, I tell them I'm a pro jock, and who do you think they give me? The Dalai Lama, himself."; "So I got that goin' for me, which is nice."; and "This crowd has gone deadly silent, a Cinderella story outta nowhere. Former greenskeeper and now about to become the masters champion." -BZ


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2. The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski has the rare distinction of going from box office flop to cult classic to a bonified comedy classic in under a decade. Although the film was initially too much for mainstream America during its 1998 release, it has forged its way into mainstream culture and become a comic favorite. It's a fave here at IGN, with a "toe by three o' clock… with nail polish!" quote here or a "we believe in nothing" quote there, The Big Lebowski is a layered, endlessly ingenious work from the endlessly ingenious Coen Brothers. Always a step ahead of the game, this may well be the Coen's greatest film and each subsequent viewing reveals another overlooked classic moment. -JO

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1. Ghostbusters
An enduring classic featuring a virtual who's-who of classic 80's comedy, from director Ivan Reitman (Meatballs, Stripes, Twins) to comic genius' Bill Murray, Dan Ackroyd and Harold Ramis (the latter two also co-wrote the script). Rick Moranis also makes a memorable leap from SCTV to the big screen and Sigourney Weaver mixes physical comedy (and terror) with outright devilish sexiness. "Are you the keymaster?" Ghostbusters is very much a product of its time yet still holds up with all the laughs and even the effects in tact. The high-concept script is ingenious, the direction and pacing are near perfection and the cast have a comedic chemistry that is nearly unmatched. I dragged my parents to the theater to see this four times in the summer of '84 and I'm still not tired of it. -JO


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