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Crop of the new twenty dollar bill.  The New Color of Money. Safer. Smarter. More Secure.
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The New Currency
The New Currency: About the New Notes
The New Currency: About the New $10 Notes
The New Currency: About the New $20 Notes
The New Currency: About the New $50 Notes
The New Currency: Interactive Notes
The New Currency: History of U.S. Currency
The New Currency: Current Notes in Circulation
The New Currency: Frequently Asked Questions
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The New Currency
   
 

About the New Notes

Image of the new notes click for more information on the new $50 note click for more information on the new $20 note click for more information on the new $10 note
Click on the $10, $20, or $50 image above for more information about that note.
The United States government continues issuing currency with enhanced designs and security features. New $20 and $50 notes were introduced in 2003 and 2004, respectively. A new $10 note will enter circulation beginning on March 2, 2006, followed later by a new $100 note. At this time, the government has no plans to redesign the $5 note. The $1 and $2 notes will not be redesigned.

This redesigned currency is safer, smarter and more secure:
Safer because it is harder to fake and easier to check;
Smarter to stay ahead of tech-savvy counterfeiters; and,
More Secure to protect the integrity of U.S. currency.

The most noticeable difference in the new designs is the introduction of subtle background colors, which makes it more burdensome for potential counterfeiters because it adds complexity to the note. The addition of color also makes it easier to distinguish between denominations because different background colors are used for each denomination.

Despite the addition of color, the redesigned notes preserve the distinct size, look and feel of traditional American currency – the world’s most familiar and circulated currency.

To protect your hard-earned money, the U.S. government expects to redesign its currency every seven to 10 years. Counterfeiting of U.S. currency has been kept at low levels through a combination of improvements in security features, aggressive law enforcement and education efforts to inform the public about how to check their currency.

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