Skip Navigation Links
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z
National Center For Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Tobacco Information and Prevention Source (TIPS)
TIPS Home | What's New | About Us | Fact Sheets | Site Map | Contact Us
Contents
• About Us
• Publications Catalog
• Surgeon General's Reports
• Research, Data, and Reports
• How To Quit
• Educational Materials
• New Citations
• Tobacco Control Program Guidelines & Data
• Celebrities Against Smoking
• Sports Initiatives
• Campaigns & Events
• Smoking and Health Database
• Related Links

 Read this page in Spanish - Esta pagina en espanol
Tobacco-Related Mortality

Fact sheet

February 2004


Overall Mortality

  • Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.1 Cigarette smoking causes an estimated 440,000 deaths, or about 1 of every 5 deaths, each year.2,3 This estimate includes 35,000 deaths from secondhand smoke exposure.2
     
  • Cigarette smoking kills an estimated 264,000 men and 178,000 women in the United States each year.2
     
  • More deaths are caused each year by tobacco use than by all deaths from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, suicides, and murders combined.2,4
     
  • On average, adults who smoke cigarettes die 13–14 years earlier than nonsmokers.2
     
  • Based on current cigarette smoking patterns, an estimated 25 million Americans who are alive today will die prematurely from smoking-related illnesses, including 5 million people younger than 18.5

     

Mortality from Specific Diseases

  • Lung cancer (124,000), heart disease (111,000), and the chronic lung diseases of emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airways obstruction (82,000) are responsible for the largest number of smoking-related deaths.2
     
  • The risk of dying from lung cancer is more than 22 times higher among men who smoke cigarettes and about 12 times higher among women who smoke cigarettes compared with never smokers.6
     
  • Since 1950, lung cancer deaths among women have increased by more than 600%.1 Since 1987, lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women.1
     
  • Cigarette smoking results in a two- to three-fold increased risk of dying from coronary heart disease.6
     
  • Cigarette smoking is associated with a ten-fold increased risk of dying from chronic obstructive lung disease.6 About 90% of all deaths from chronic obstructive lung diseases are attributable to cigarette smoking.1,6
     
  • Pipe smoking and cigar smoking increase the risk of dying from cancers of the lung, esophagus, larynx, and oral cavity.7 Smokeless tobacco use increases the risk for developing oral cancer.8

     

References

1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Women and Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2001. Accessed: February 2004.
 
2 CDC. Annual smoking-attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and economic costs—United States, 1995–1999. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2002;51(14):300–303. (PDF Image PDF - 225k) Accessed: February 2004.
 
3 CDC. Health United States, 2003 With Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans. (PDF Image PDF - 119k)  Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Center for Health Statistics; 2003. Accessed: February 2004.
 
4 McGinnis J, Foege WH. Actual causes of death in United States. Journal of American Medical Association 1993;270:2207–2212.
 
5 CDC. Perspectives in disease prevention and health promotion, smoking-attributable mortality and years of potential life lost—United States, 1984. (PDF Image PDF - 309k) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1997;46:444–451. Accessed: February 2004.
 
6 Novotny TE, Giovino GA. Tobacco use. In: Brownson RC, Remington PL, Davis JR (eds). Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Control. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association; 1998;117–148.
 
7 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking — 25 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 1989. DHHS Pub. No. (CDC) 89-8411. Accessed: February 2004.
 
8 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Using Smokeless Tobacco: A Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General, 1986. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. NIH Pub. No. 86-2874. Accessed: February 2004.
 

Note: More recent information may be available at the CDC'S Office on Smoking and Health Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco.

 

For Further Information

Office on Smoking and Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Mailstop K-50
4770 Buford Hwy., N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30341-3717
770-488-5705
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco

Media Inquiries: Contact the CDC's Office on Smoking and Health press line at 770-488-5493.


One or more documents on this Web page is available in Portable Document Format (PDF). You will need Acrobat Reader (a free application) to view and print these documents.



Privacy Policy | Accessibility

TIPS Home | What's New | About Us | Fact sheets | Site Map | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed August 08, 2005

United States Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Office on Smoking and Health